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Michael Alan wrote:Beautiful machine. Do you have any tips for grinding fresh wheat for pasta?



For pasta, I'd recommend grinding durum wheat. There's more info here about this type of wheat: https://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-durum-wheat-for-sale-bucket
 
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Mark William wrote:

Also, I noticed with interest in the description that the mill is rated to grind dent corn. Is there any reason to avoid milling flint corn as well?



I can't say about the KoMo specifically, but the stone burrs on my Wonder Junior have little divots chipped out of them from trying to grind flint corn!

I strongly recommend getting a dedicated corn mill if you plan to grind flint corn. Look for one that's solid steel.
 
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I have never been hugely into bread, but I get near-religious in my love for porridge. A coarse grind and long simmer sounds so much less arduous than the fine milling and intricate baking process - though I know that for many, that process is their art, which I admire. I guess I just prefer my carbs hot and mushy? Especially when butter gets involved! Perhaps I'm wrong to post this in the bread forum, but there's something to be said for boiling grains as well as baking them. Also, I'd love that mill!
 
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I would love one of these mills. I could store grains and grind on demand! Perfect for sourdough.
 
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Ellendra Nauriel wrote:

Mark William wrote:

Also, I noticed with interest in the description that the mill is rated to grind dent corn. Is there any reason to avoid milling flint corn as well?



I can't say about the KoMo specifically, but the stone burrs on my Wonder Junior have little divots chipped out of them from trying to grind flint corn!

I strongly recommend getting a dedicated corn mill if you plan to grind flint corn. Look for one that's solid steel.



I agree. For flint corn, it would be best to get a mill specifically designed to mill corn. The KoMo is better suited for dent corn as that is not as hard.
 
Ginny Clark
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Sara Townsend wrote:What a beautiful machine!

Is there a guide for how coarse/fine to grind a particular grain for a recipe? (I'm a grain mill neophyte, can you tell?)

Is there a maintenance schedule for the motor? Are replacement parts readily available? Is there a manually-operated version of this mill?

Many thanks!







Excellent questions, Sara! With this mill, I like to grind my grain pretty fine for bread. There is a spectrum of dots on the front of this mill and you simply turn the hopper from the "finest" dot to the "coarsest" dot or anywhere in between to get your desired texture. For breads and pancakes, I usually grind it on the finest setting or close to it. If I'm grinding oats to put on top of my loaf of bread to make it look pretty, I'll grind on a coarser setting.

There is no maintenance schedule for the motor. One thing I love about this mill is how easy it is to use and clean. Most of the time you just mill your flour and either brush off excess flour dust with a little brush or damp cloth. If you need to clean the grinding stones, you just run about a 1/2 cup of white rice through the machine and that cleans them! So simple!

There is a 12-year warranty on this mill. We do have replacement parts available here: https://pleasanthillgrain.com/replacement-parts/grain-mills/komo-grain-mills

KoMo also makes a beautiful hand grinder: https://pleasanthillgrain.com/komo-hand-grinder-grain-mill
 
Ginny Clark
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Jenner Aycock-Jandreau wrote:I’m in the search for a grain mill, and love everything I’ve heard and seen about the KoMo, but the price is daunting. I’m thinking of cleaning out the coffee grinder I don’t use, and using it for grain instead, until I can save up the money for something good.
I got the impression from what you wrote that the KoMo is worth the wait!?



Hi Jenner, it's definitely worth saving up for and getting! I stayed home with my kids when they were younger and after they all were in school, I started working part-time again. The KoMo Classic was the first thing I purchased after I started working again and am so happy I did!
 
I think she's lovely. It's this tiny ad that called her crazy:
THANK YOU & 30% OFF EVERYTHING IN THE NURSERY!
https://permies.com/t/181445/perennial-vegetables/NURSERY
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