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About these videos

"Hello All,

Here is a new "Homesteading for Beginners" video series I started a few weeks ago on YouTube. The Permies community really helped me find my target audience and refine my process so I hope you will appreciate all the hard work that has gone in to it so far. At first, I was just taking shots in the dark on this channel. Now, I feel like I'm on a journey to something great and this is only the beginning! There are soooo many people to draw inspiration from in the permaculture community that I know I will never run out of ideas.

As always, your feedback is invaluable to the success of this series and to the channel as a whole. You Homesteading PROS out there are who I REALLY want to hear from! Please feel free to share all your thoughts and constructive criticisms! I have a thick skin too so don't be afraid to offend me either. Tell me what you like, what you don't like, what I should keep doing, what I should stop doing, what works, what doesn't and what you want to see more or less of on my channel. With your help, suggestions and support, I'm confident that we can build something great here that will appeal to a very wide audience!

My primary goal is to help other homesteading newbies, like myself, to actualize their Homestead Dream! So if you are just getting started and you have no idea what you're doing, or you need some ideas, this is the place for you!

For more on me and my story, please read the biography on my forum profile and check out my blog at http://maplegrove.productions

Thank you for taking the time to read my posts and watch my videos. I truly appreciate your support! And don't forget to Dream BIG and Dream Often, my friends! :)

P.S. My first few "Homesteading for Beginners" videos will focus on preparing and planting bare root fruit/nut trees. I will then start branching out to other topics. Being that it's winter for me now, the focus will probably shift towards thrifty things like canning tips & tricks, for example. To be perfectly honest, I'm not exactly sure what I'm going to do for the next couple months but you can bet it will be interesting and unique! Before long it will be maple syrup season again so I plan to do a few videos around that, or maybe even dedicate a whole series to it since I have a good 30 years of experience to back it up. So stay tuned!"

---

Preparing Bare Root FRUIT TREES for Planting

Our homesteading journey begins with some pro tips and best practices around preparing bare root fruit trees for planting.



Planting Bare Roots

In this video, I will share with you some best practices around planting your bare root fruit trees and winterizing them, or in other words, getting them ready to battle the harsh elements of winter.



Bare Root NUT TREE Planting & Winterizing

In this video, I will share with you some best practices around planting your bare root nut trees and winterizing them, or in other words, getting them ready to battle the harsh elements of winter.



Learn how to plant and winterize Korean Pine trees. (PINUS KORAIENSIS)



Tips and Tricks for Plating Fruit and Nut Trees



YouTube Channel
Maple Grove Productions

Related Websites
Maple Grove Productions
COMMENTS:
 
gardener
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Location: Missoula, MT US Hardy:5a Annual Precipitation: 15" Wind:4.2mph Temperature:18-87F
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I give this video series 10 out of 10 acorns!

Matt Leger does a fantastic job of introducing the basics of gardening to beginners. i love the straightforward demonstrations and explanations that he gives in his videos
 
pioneer
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Dave Burton wrote:I give this video series 10 out of 10 acorns!

Matt Leger does a fantastic job of introducing the basics of gardening to beginners. i love the straightforward demonstrations and explanations that he gives in his videos



Thanks so much for your support, Dave!
 
Matt Leger
pioneer
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Stay tuned for a couple of new "Homesteading for Beginners" videos on simple machines and DIY tools, starting with:

The Trundle Wheel 🔵 - a simple, DIY tool that makes measuring long distances a breeze. The best part is anyone can make one. They're super easy to build and operate!

 
Matt Leger
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Another quick and easy simple machine. Today's I'm showing you how to build a sawbuck from old or broken pallets. New pallets would work fine too but there are so many other uses for them, it's best to use old, beat-up pallets if you can instead.

All it takes to build one is 1 or 2 pallets, a hand saw or chains saw and 3 minutes of your time. Thanks to this guy for the idea: https://youtu.be/waxfOrAjWvE

 
Matt Leger
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In this "Homesteading for Beginners" video, I walk you through the process of identifying and collecting fiddleheads, as well as timing your harvest and other useful tips and tricks. This delicacy can only be enjoyed for a short window every season so don't miss your chance to harvest one of nature's most delicious and nutritious bounties!

VERY IMPORTANT: Fiddleheads from Ostrich ferns and other fern varieties can be toxic if not prepared properly. Be sure to do plenty of research to make sure you are well versed in fiddlehead collection and preparation before you attempt to ingest them. Don't risk a trip to the ER!

Health Canada advises to cook fiddleheads in a rolling boil of water for a minimum of 15 min. You can also steam them for a minimum of 10-12 min, or until tender. To preserve them long-term, you can blanch them in salted, boiling water for 2 min, plunge them in an ice bath until cool. Once properly packed and stored, fiddleheads will keep for up to 1 year in the freezer, that way you can enjoy a few more times throughout the year and/or share with family and friends.

 
Matt Leger
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In this "Homsteading for Beginners" video, I walk you through the process of cooking and preserving fiddleheads, as well as other useful tips and tricks. This delicacy can only be enjoyed for a short window every season so don't miss your chance to harvest one of nature's most delicious and nutritious bounties!

 
Matt Leger
pioneer
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In this "Homsteading for Beginners" video, we collect a common and plentiful wild edible that often gets a bad rap and accused of being a mere weed. But of course, if you're watching this, you know better than that! ;) Yes, I'm talking about Dandelions - an opportunity to rake in a great yield with little effort. The idea is to make wine from the flowers, use the leaves as salad greens and dry the roots to make tea. It's all a big learning experience and we are sure enjoying the ride this year despite the crappy weather! It's all thanks to hardy native species (like the dandelion) that we can forage and count on every year, regardless of what mother nature throws our way.

Here's the recipe I'm using to make the wine:
https://www.ricardocuisine.com%2Fen%2Frecipes%2F5449-dandelion-wine

How to Harvest Dandelion Root and Make Roasted Dandelion Tea
https://learningherbs.com/remedies-recipes/dandelion-root/

Thanks for watching! Don't forget to like, comment and subscribe to help us keep making these videos for everyone to enjoy! :)

 
Matt Leger
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Did you know hostas are edible? I didn't until recently. I was originally planning to use them as a chop and drop plant since they have such nice, big leaves. But after finding out I could eat the things, I've decide to switch my game plan to growing them out to harvest. Apparently they have a crisp, oniony flavor and the texture of asparagus. Even the flowers are edible! I can't wait to eat try them!

Here's the link to the article that a fellow permie shared with me on the forums:
https://practicalselfreliance.com/edible-hostas/

 
Matt Leger
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Keep your garden free of pests with this recipe that uses all natural products.

*** Please do your research before using any product on your plants, whether they are "natural" or chemical-based. There are no shortcuts or substitutes for solid R&D so take the time to do yours before you get started with your pest control strategy.

And remember that nature will always take her share. There's nothing you can do about that. However, there is plenty you can do to mitigate potential damage and protect your investments.

If anyone is interested, I will post the pest control recipe used in this video below. We continue to use the same recipe to this day but the potency was increased by double for better results. It's now working great! And even keeps the mosquitoes away! :)

MGP *ALL NATURAL* PEST CONTROL SOLUTION
(You can adjust this for your own preference and needs)

- 20-30 tsp of Neem Oil
- 7-9 tsp of Lemon Eucalyptus Oil
- 7-9 tsp of All Purpose Organic Lavender Oil Soap
- 15 L of warm water

DIRECTIONS

1. Add neem oil, lemon eucalyptus and soap to your sprayer's reservoir.
2. Add warm water. (You can use hot water to better mix the ingredients but be sure to let the liquid cool thoroughly before spraying it on your plants.)
3. Mix thoroughly.
4. Spray generously on the leaves of your fruit trees, nut trees, wild edibles, leafy greens and any other problem area in your garden. The best time to do this is at night when the sun has set and AFTER you water them. If you water after you spray, you'll run the risk of washing away your solution.
5. IMPORTANT: Any produce that comes in contact with your solution should be washed THOROUGHLY when harvest time comes, especially leafy greens, fruits and any other plant which has an exterior that you plan to eat (skins, leaves, etc.).

Good luck with your pest control! Remember that it doesn't have to be a battle. You can work with nature to get the results you're looking for, most of the time with simple, chemical-free applications and strategies. If you have any questions, please let me know in the comments. I try my best to answer all questions and respond to all comments promptly when I can.

 
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Your first link to maple grove productions is not working
Otherwise you are doing well
 
Matt Leger
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John C Daley wrote:Your first link to maple grove productions is not working
Otherwise you are doing well



Hi John. Thanks so much for pointing that out! I'm not able to edit original post for some reason but I have reported to the forum staff. Hopefully they can assist. I appreciate the encouraging words also. :) Glad you're enjoying the series. The playlist has become my official series on YouTube at this point.

Take care and have a great Sunday!
 
Matt Leger
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Today's Wild Edible episode is on MINT. You can almost guarantee that you'll find some of this wild edible growing in your backyard or in a nearby wooded forest.

 
Matt Leger
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Part 6 of our Wild Edibles series. Today we're looking at Wood Sorrels. No, it's not clover, but it's often mistaken for it. This tangy, lemony delight grows everywhere and is super easy to identify. It's a great topper for any garden salad. It also makes a great ground cover crop that's easy to grow and requires no maintenance. ☘️

 
Matt Leger
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Call it what you want - wild garlic, wild leek, ramps, whatever. It's one of my favorite wild edibles but it's one that is also under threat from over-harvesting and poaching. That's why I approach this one cautiously. Please forage responsibly!

 
Matt Leger
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After it's all said and done, our first couple of trial runs with microgreens and sprouts were pretty successful! In today's Homesteading for Beginners video, I share some of the tips and tricks I've learned along the way. I still have a lot to learn but I now have a solid foundation of knowledge and first hand experience. I'm confident that the next time I try to do this, I will be even more successful by applying succession, properly light cycles and a higher focus on moisture/temperature levels.

That said, we brought in a few dozen cups of greens/sprouts on our second attempt and even sprouted some on one of our first year hugel mounds! So I'd call that a success. :) If anyone has their own best practices for growing microgreens/sprouts, please share! I'd love to hear them.

For those who have never tried or have limited outdoor space for growing, this is the crop for you! Not only are they easy to grow, require little maintenance and cheap but they are also super foods and highly nutritious. The only downside is not being to consume them all if you grow too many. Wouldn't it be nice if all our problems were based on over-abundance? ;)

 
Matt Leger
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How to make CRUNCHY Pickles 🥒🌶 - featuring Zoe and Dad. After a good growing season, preserving your harvest is half the work. Luckily, there are simple and delicious ways to accomplish this such as pickling, canning and fermentation. As Zoe demonstrates, it's so easy even a Dad can do it! 😉👨‍🌾

 
Matt Leger
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WATER - a topic of much debate and one that is clearly not fully understood, especially when you consider how much water we humans waste on a daily basis. It's a long'ish video but if you can sit through it, it will be worthwhile, I promise!

There are few topics I know better than water so if anyone has any followup questions or wants to continue the discussion here. To the community of Permies.com, I particularly value and appreciate your comments because they are ALWAYS filled with important feedback so please chime in on this one if you have something to add or to correct me on something you disagree with. Thank you in advance! :)

 
Think of how stupid the average person is. And how half of them are stupider than that. - Carlin But who reads this tiny ad?
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