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Russian Comfrey - Bocking 14 - Canada Only (due to government regulations)

 
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Russian Comfrey is great for permaculture and has so many uses. Very effective ground cover to start with as it gets huge with time and the leaves are very large.


I'm 5'10" and this plant is about 3 years old. It really does get big.


The leaves closer to the ground get huge!

Useful medicinally and/or as a forage crop for your furry livestock.

The beauty of it is that Bocking 14 Russian Comfrey is sterile. It will not spread by seed. However, you can dig up a plant after a year, separate it into many individual roots, plant those roots and each will grow a new plant. (That will become huge over time.)
The point being it won't take over your pasture/farm/fields over time all on it's own as common comfrey will. It's not "invasive".

I sell ONLY the The "Bocking 14 strain" of Russian Comfrey.

I can and will ship these anywhere in Canada via Canada Post.

Apologies to those in the US or other countries but government regulations that protect your existing plants prevent shipping roots directly to the US. (It can be done but it's an expensive process requiring government inspections, certificates, etc.)


● SMALL ROOT CUTTINGS are 2.00 each
These are about 3 to 5 inches long and thinner than a pencil, these take the longest to sprout but are the best value. These are best planted in spring and summer.

● LARGE ROOT CUTTINGS are 5.00 each
These are 3-6 inches long and and thicker than a pencil. These will start faster than the small cuttings. These can be planted in spring summer and early fall.

● CONTACT INFO AND AVAILABILITY ● PHONE NUMBER: 416-745-2221 ● Email: magelord at zing-net.ca (change "at" to "@" and remove spaces. This stops bots harvesting my email address.)
NOTE: No text messages please. This is a landline.


Colleen and Rick A.
 
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Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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With the intention of cultivating one for use as a manure tea and the other for possible emergency rations I ordered both Bocking 14 and Bocking 4 and planted them in separate plots (I had harvested 100 leaves a week from a wild variety and dried them in the gas oven by means of the pilot light and used the tea on my indoor plants instead of store bought soluble fertilizer)

The next spring I dug up the Bocking 14 and divided it into 20 pieces which I started in pots before transplanting them. When I inspected the Bocking 4 which I had grown in raised beds for easier harvesting (If you like the texture of runner beans mixed with okra then they're great) I found extensive crown rot but went ahead and divided them anyway with some of the rotted crowns producing foliage.
 
Rick Armstrong
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Burl Smith wrote:With the intention of cultivating one for use as a manure tea and the other for possible emergency rations I ordered both Bocking 14 and Bocking 4 and planted them in separate plots (I had harvested 100 leaves a week from a wild variety and dried them in the gas oven by means of the pilot light and used the tea on my indoor plants instead of store bought soluble fertilizer)

The next spring I dug up the Bocking 14 and divided it into 20 pieces which I started in pots before transplanting them. When I inspected the Bocking 4 which I had grown in raised beds for easier harvesting (If you like the texture of runner beans mixed with okra then they're great) I found extensive crown rot but went ahead and divided them anyway with some of the rotted crowns producing foliage.




It's an amazing plant, isn't it, Burl?

We make a manure tea from it for the inside plants and it's terrific.

I haven't run into the root rot on mine but I know it can happen. We haven't had any issues with pests either so I think that's testimony to how robust the plant is.

One thing I didn't mention above is that although it won't "spread" on it's own, when you gig it up you're pretty much guaranteed that the original plant will re-grow from even the smallest bits of root left behind.
In that sense it's similar to rhubarb.

About 20 years ago I had a friend at work tell me he got rid of his rhubarb patch the previous weekend.
I asked him how and he said "I took the rototiller to it!"
I did a 'facepalm'.... long before it was popular..... And I told him that every little bit of cut up root will probably grow a new plant.

Six months later he told me he had rhubarb plants coming up by the hundreds. (I went to his place and dug up most of them and took them home!)
 
Burl Smith
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Location: Richwood, West Virginia
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you're pretty much guaranteed that the original plant will re-grow from even the smallest bits of root left behind.



Well I didn't know they are like Jerusalem Artichokes which sprout from teensiest pieces left behind. I have to practice 'chop and drop' with them popping up in the potatoes.
 
I got this tall by not having enough crisco in my diet as a kid. This ad looks like it had plenty of shortening:
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
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