Brent Rogers

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since Jan 13, 2012
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Recent posts by Brent Rogers

How is Sepp currently dealing with humanure?
4 years ago
Andrew,

I heard in an interview you did that you helped with the development of Maynard's vineyard. Besides the terracing are there other Permaculture techniques in action? My family owns a vineyard in Oregon. I know that the climate zone is much different, but I was hoping to learn any useful techniques that are being applied successfully. Is he incorporating any Biodynamic techniques?
5 years ago
from my understanding the land is not owned

Zj Frank wrote:I'm thinking about buying a smallish urban lot (about an acre and a quarter or so)



...but yes, if the land is owned then always do site survey and analysis first. Then grow what is appropriate for the site.
5 years ago

I would recommend finishing your business plan before you begin observing land. If you design your business plan with Permaculture and holistic management principles in mind then you will know more of what you are looking for in land. I think it will also help you to figure out your implementation action plan...what comes first? With minimal capital the obvious choice would be that which can be implemented inexpensively, but have the greatest return of investment.
5 years ago
I like what Luke is suggesting..."graceful" civil disobedience. The RMH has a few features that allow it to be "under the radar".

The RMH requires little wood. If you have a large yard or acreage you can collect your fuel on your property. This will help you avoid hauling large amounts wood, which is a dead giveaway that you have a stove at all.

The emissions are low and much cleaner than conventional stoves. If your neighbors can't see or smell smoke...how will they know you have a RMH?

I would think that with some creativity, they could be camouflaged to be an ultra frugal couch and end table.

I would love to see the RMH get into many more homes, and I hope the code officials get on board soon!
5 years ago
How are you able to supply adequate water for so much livestock in such brittle areas? I have heard of lot of ideas in this space, such as: water catchment from solid surfaces, portable troughs on trailers, exclusion access to ponds. Are you using any of these? What is your water secret? Thank you.
5 years ago
Allen,

You're work is truly saving this planet and I hope people catch on soon! In your TED talk you said that some of the land you worked with originally had no vegetation. I recall one where nobody could find a blade of grass on a 100 mile drive. You spoke of the Sigmoid Curve, but without grass what are you applying that to? I can understand starting the livestock on low feed and rotating often, but I simply can't wrap my head around how it is possible to have this sort of impact on the land without feed. What you have accomplished is amazing!
5 years ago
Wyll,

I am a Douglas County Permie, but as of yet, I do not have much cob experience. However, you are in luck! Ianto Evans, author of "The Hand Sculpted House", lives in Coquille. Attending a workshop would probably be the best idea. You can go to his website www.cobcottage.com to view all of the workshops. If you don't have the time or money, you may be able to call and arrange a time to visit with Ianto. I have wanted to make it out to Cob Cottage for a few years now, but it hasn't happened. Maybe this is the year!
5 years ago
Kugel,

I can do you one better, because we have exact cost calculated. Altogether the project cost $620. That's for all the metal involved in the plow frame, coulter mounts, and 18" coulters with hub assemblies. I am familiar with the open source ecology one, and personally I think they missed a lot of key design elements. They were very brave in trying to create a shank, but there is a lot of engineering that has gone into them and I don't think they can be replicated easily and still be effective. That is why we bought our 26" shanks from Yeomans. As for the frame, it looks okay, but it is being pulled on the front of the tractor. Even with their tractor design, an implement like this is very hard on the hydraulics that are used to control the front end loader. That is why the plows are mounted on the rear, this is the ideal spot to tow an implement like this. Each shank has a shear pin that breaks away at 7000 lbs, so on our plow three teeth equals 21000 lbs of pull. That's enough to make some serious and costly mistakes, if you ask me. P.S. I am in Western Oregon if you are ever over this way. I am about an hour south of Eugene.
5 years ago
Eric,

I would not think that Hugelkultur would be the right tool for diversion or filtration. From my experience, a Hugelkultur bed is great at absorbing water and holding it for extended amounts of time. It may work for diversion, but it will most likely take up the toxins in the water and you will just be keeping pollutants around longer. My suggestion would be to check out "Mycelium Running" by Paul Stamets. This book has details on how to successfully utilize mycofiltration (the use of mycelium to filter microorganisms, pollutants, and silt) and mycoremediation (the use of fungi to degrade or remove toxins). You may be able to construct a Hugelkultur, with more wood than typically used, and inoculate it with mycelium! Paul Stamets has a process where he inoculates sawdust and wood chips inside of a burlap bag, then places them in the ground, on contour, as a filter. I hope this helps. Also, I think large Hugelkultur would make a nice berm for sound and air pollution.
5 years ago