Jen Schellings

+ Follow
since Jan 15, 2012
PA
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
2
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
1
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Jen Schellings

Without knowing what specifically you need meds for, only general acknowledgment that herbs can work for many things can be safely given. You may have something serious that you heard an herb 'was good for' and go try it without doing research and do more harm. There are contrindications with meds or with some conditions, if say, you had your thyroid removed.
With my own non serious needs, I turn to herbs first and they do indeed work. But there's more tol consider than simply replacing pills with an herb, it is holistic, as LaLena described.
(My best friend's name was Lalena, what a nice surprise it is to see that name again!)
6 years ago
Have to agree with elderberry use. The syrup is my weapon against any flu virus. Taken everyday as a preventative, or at the onset of symptoms it shortens the duration by dulling the spikes on the virus so they can't take over the healthy cells and replicate. It supports the immune system function very well. The option of not getting it all through healthier diet is of course the ideal option. I can't agree with the cut onion option as I have never tried it and prefer to eat my onions, and have them help keep me fed and healthy
6 years ago
Steve - it is a fairly easy plant to grow, like most mints. You could start it indoors in the spring or wait until about April or May to plant it directly into the soil. It's not a fussy plant so doesn't have special needs. It's a prarie plant and is happiest in full sun but likes to have some shade from the full summer afgternoon sun. It also seems to like a chance to have dry feet now and then so make sure not to over water. Mine seemed happiest next to the mountain mint I have growing which is a bit of a straggly sprawler against the the tall straight agastache, they like each other in my garden. Pinching the new sets leafs makes a fuller plant. Oh I am so ready for next spring!
6 years ago
Paul, I first heard of Hugelkultur last night through a blog I read every few days. It linked to a thread where others were discussing their success, tips and ideas on hugelkultur. I spent 2 hours reading and skimming through 17 pages and made up my mind to try it in my own small garden, on a much smaller scale. I only grow herbs and veg, I do not have much room and want to try to do more with the space I have. I love the name, it's intriguing and old world and speaks to me of my European farming ancestors. I came back this afternoon and read more and signed up to join this forum because of the wealth of people and information and ideas - and the general good attitude of folks in here. I will be sharing this with sustainability, urban homesteading, organic gardening bloggers I check in with both on their sites and on Facebook. I will share this will all my gardening friends, my local AG Extension office and local conservation organizations - there's one in my town. Our state just held our Farm Show week in the capital and I wish I had known about this yesterday when I was there, I could have brought it up with the farmers. The folks at The Farm in Tennessee must know about this already and Plenty should also know. I have some emails to write.

If one person could be turned in less than 24 to try it and share the information, then you will get your 50 million...it only take a while.

Ah, and I agree with you about the effing lightbulbs and the greenwashing of Joe and Jane Public.

Jen
I have two that I rely on for a variety of reasons, but mostly for growing & prep -

Richo Cech "Making Plant Medicine" he also has "The Medicinal Herb Grower" as the growing companion to the medicine makers book.

James Green "The Herbal Medicine Maker's Handbook: A home Manual". Full of all sorts of good information on making medicine's of all sorts focusing on a couple dozen chosen herbs.

7 years ago
I have tried twice to grow stevia, but it only survives until winter & never grows very large. I'm experienced in growing all sorts of things, but this is not working, I believe, because it is from a very different region with different climate. I'm not fussed about it because I'm one of the few who find it so overly sweet, even using less then recommended, I can't drink or eat anything made with it - especially Truvia. To me it tastes like the artificial sweeteners. I instead use agave syrup, maple sugar or syrup or just unrefined evaporated cane sugar.
7 years ago
I've been growing anise hyssop, agastache foeniculum, for several years from the same plant. It has survived mild drought and wet seasons. It doesn't mind the cold - I'm in Zone 7 but in the winter we get down to the teens in January & early February - and grown back the next spring. I cut it back in early summer for dried leaves and some fresh use and to make the plant fuller, then wait for the flower spikes & harvest them, and then follows a 3rd growth which I let be as a 3rd harvest tends to be bitter. I typically use it to flavor my honey or to make infusions from. One season, I let it grow as big as it wanted and did not harvest it. It was well over 5 feet high by early August & crawling with bees & other insects of many varieties!
7 years ago
Zinc is needed to balance the TH1 and TH2 cell function in the immune system which will prevent the cytokine storm. It's also very helpful to those with autoimmune disorders as it reduces inflammation, supporting the immune function which has been overly stimulated. I feel I need to mention this as well: those with autoimmune disorders should be avoiding things that stimulate the system and instead look for modulators or adaptogens. Echinacea is a stimulator (and doesn't work for everyone), astragalus is a modulator and an adaptogen, oregon grape is a modulator. Modulators balance and support the system, allowing it to work as it should. I use ionic zinc drops but lozenges can work as well. The liquid ionic form of zinc sulfate is, I think, more easily usable by the body, better absorbed into the system.


http://www.advance-health.com/zinc.html


http://www.ajcn.org/content/68/2/447S.full.pdf
7 years ago

Lacia Lynne Bailey wrote:thanks Leah! 
I did consider fruit leather, but I really do not like the elderberry taste, even when I tried mixing it with other fruits.  I could experiment more with a "cover" taste, but its definitely "medicine" for me and the dried ones go down so easy, lol.

Any other ideas out there for the stems or a cover taste?

If you're in Seattle, email me privately and come finish them off tomorrow or maybe Sat, they are drying on the tree, what's left from the birds.  Someone from Vashon was excited about coming to harvest them with me, but it never worked out and its down to the last possible day or two now.



I'm new to this forum, hello. I use red raspberries or black raspberries to cover the flavor of elderberries & to add vitamins. I do not have access to my own elderberries so I have to buy them already dried & just pick the stems out before soaking & cooking the berries. I add the raspberries about halfway through the simmer time. If you're using frozen, they should be thawed first so that the cold berries don't bring down the temp of the simmering berries. A raspberry syrup will sweeten & flavor the cooked elderberries as well. I depend on my elderberry syrup to keep me healthy while those around me are coughing & sniffling. My son loves it too & has prevented quite a few bouts of colds & other viruses spread through schools.
7 years ago