Frolf Lundgren

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since Feb 20, 2012
Finland, MN
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Recent posts by Frolf Lundgren

I don't see descriptions for the Art Ludwig podcasts, what should we expect? What will be the deciding factors for which podcasts are free and which are for pay? I want $2.50 from you after listening to the Dell Artemis podcasts. Or, I'd be willing to pay you $2.50 to never talk to them again. Oh vay!
I wouldn't use any of the above to describe permaculture to those unfamiliar with the practice. Most sound nerdy and pretentious, like you're trying way too hard to impress. Simply use words like organic, sustainable, healthy. If you want to go further you could push the ideas of restoration, working with nature rather than against her. Edible garden also piques varying areas of interest.
5 years ago
Don't tell me its spelled chipmunk. My chipmonks display monk-ish qualities (they wear robes and shave the top of their heads).

Anyway, I have many holes in my bed. The mice like em. They're kind of cute, especially the ones that hop around (kangaroo mice?). Naturally, the snakes have come (garters). I've seen one slither into one of the holes. My second bed (no soil yet) has a chipmonk coming out from underneath it. Whenever I'm messing around in there he pops out and hangs with me. I often find him/her munching on the chop n droppables. Very amusing.

I'm thinking of not covering the chipmonk hiding spot and even making a mini gable roof so I have the hole and planting area nearby.

My goal is to grow too much food, so there's plenty to go around. I figure I destroyed some habitat, might as well create some.
5 years ago
I'm aware of cedar's alleopathic qualities.

I was listening to a Paul-cast with Geoff Lawton, I forget which number it was, but Geoff mentioned that it took more microbes to digest the wood. More microbes, the better is my understanding.

I do not put cedar in the middle, outside or top of my beds. Strictly in the trench I dug for sod, top soil. The cedar gets as much contact with the ground as possible, to be buried under birch trunks. The cedar is out of touch with any plants, roots (I build big beds). In the long run, i believe I'm adding more microbial diversity to my beds without adding harmful qualities. Plus I'm filling the trenches with water soaked wood, so I don't need to bury as much birch (higher beds, more surface area to grow).

Don't overlook cedar when raising big beds.
5 years ago
Wouldn't the entire bed need to be made of biochar? If it lasts that long, and wood deteriorates that quickly, you'd be left with nothing but char anyway. I imagine that would leave you with a small raised bed, which defeats the purpose of raising beds.
5 years ago