benjamim fontes

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since Apr 07, 2012
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Recent posts by benjamim fontes

" (quote) Bamboo is a great idea for planting instead of fences.


You just have to know how to limit the growth of its root system. Unlike most plants, the root system of bamboo is the horizontal position and not vertical. It is this feature and contributes to the formation of bamboo forests. To limit the growth of the root system of bamboo is a simple solution. Digging a trench 0.5-0.7 m deep, filled with sand at 20 to 30cm., shrouded geotextile the entire gutter with a sunset on the side. Planted seedlings to a depth of 0.3 m, so that soil covers the root system. On the bottom of the planting pit is to put some sea pebbles or crushed stone. If you are planning on planting several plants, the distance between them should be about 0.5 m. the Geotextile will not allow the roots exit the borders of the ditch beyond.

Yes, bamboo is a good option.
Simple solution (i am citing): Digging a trench 0.5-0.7 m deep.
1 year ago

Michael Newby wrote:The fish survived the winter!


Nice gold fish!!!
3 years ago

Michael Newby wrote:Here's a couple of pictures updating the pond's progress filling. The first one the pond had just covered the little mini swale I made a little lower in the pond and the second one shows that the pond had just made it to the little shade lean-to and I had to take it down. Now that it's cooled down a little it seems to be filling quite a bit faster probably due to less evaporation.


Great job, Michael Newby!!!
We have a little pond in a porous soil but we have a lot of water. Now it is full of water. This photo is from the time the little pond was "having" the "first" water...
3 years ago

Stewart Lundy wrote:
This principle is identical to what Viktor Schauberger called "implosion": as water approaches the anomaly point (+4C) from either direction (cooling or heating to +4C), it contracts, drawing elements into itself.


We use various methods to remove the seeds dormancy: place the seeds in the freezer for one day or two before sowing. Or putting the seeds in warm water for the same purpose.
Benjamim Fontes North Portugal mediterranian area.
3 years ago

William Anderson wrote:Hi there,
We're in the process of buying land and have come across what we think could be perfect, in terms of place, orientation, etc however it is currently been planted (around 150 acres or so) with blue eucalyptus as part of a government initiative here in Australia. It has been clear cut once, and the stumps are now all re-growing (apparently you can coppice blue gums in this way about 6 times). The land comes much more cheaply (than normal pasture), because it has been damaged by the plantation. We like the idea of regenerating poor farm land, however this is a lot of plantation to re-convert. Almost a scary amount.

Ultimately we'd want to turn a chunk back into native forest, a chunk into pasture land for sheep and possible cattle and a chunk into a food forrest / orchard of some description.

Does anyone know what the best way to possibly tackle this might be? The farmer started bulldosing about 20 acres, which has created a horrible scar. I'd love to avoid doing that, but I'm not sure how to approach it. Any tips, advice or pointers where I can research this more would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks
Will


Hi William Anderson
I advise You to see this video from two brasilian farmers using eucaliptus and bananas tree as mulching for crops and fooforest. They call it agroecology. The video is in portugiese but you can see the "legendas" in english. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7h-JbaJjn4 see you later Benjamim Fontes Norht Portugal
3 years ago

benjamim fontes wrote:

Jerry McIntire wrote:We have a series of natural springs on our land which feed a year-round stream. I don't know the flow rate yet, want to test it (we've been here just one month). We will also test the water quality. Hoping to put in a spring house to use it for drinking water instead of digging another well. We are also hoping to put in a pond and some swales to a. give us a swimming hole and b. capture and spread the stream flow during large rain events. Right now that water runs through the land and leaves, post haste, via our unimaginative and relatively straight stream.
I'll have to come back to this thread when we have more information...
Jerry


Jerry and others,
I have too two springs in our garden (1 hectar) here in north Portugal, I will see what I can do. if I have information, I will post it.
I will apreciate your thoughts.
I coud not add a attachment of our land in Portugal because it was not in jpg. Sorry
Regards
North Portugal
Benjamim Fontes



I will try to add my attachment on jpg.
Regards.
Benjamim Fontes
4 years ago

Jerry McIntire wrote:We have a series of natural springs on our land which feed a year-round stream. I don't know the flow rate yet, want to test it (we've been here just one month). We will also test the water quality. Hoping to put in a spring house to use it for drinking water instead of digging another well. We are also hoping to put in a pond and some swales to a. give us a swimming hole and b. capture and spread the stream flow during large rain events. Right now that water runs through the land and leaves, post haste, via our unimaginative and relatively straight stream.
I'll have to come back to this thread when we have more information...
Jerry


Jerry and others,
I have too two springs in our garden (1 hectar) here in north Portugal, I will see what I can do. if I have information, I will post it.
I will apreciate your thoughts.
I coud not add a attachment of our land in Portugal because it was not in jpg. Sorry
Regards
North Portugal
Benjamim Fontes
4 years ago
Amazing course "Geoff Lawton PDC".
North Portugal
Benjamim Fontes

Zach Weiss wrote:



I'm a big fan of Spelt, Buckwheat,

I'm sure other details of Sepp's work has been lost in translation, but nothing comes right to mind. This is why it is most important to let nature be your ultimate teacher. What works in one place may not work in another, thing may be translated wrong, and people make mistakes. Observing the nature and letting those observations be your guide, that is a strategy that is full proof.

I would love to send it to as many as I can that will successfully propagate it. The seed exchange is more to avoid sending some of this precious seed to someone who will not be able to successfully propagate it. Favorite plant is fine, I just want the person to be a confident and competent saver of seed.

I believe Sepp Einkorn is a soft hulled variety, so the grain is hulless after threshing. As far as I know hot or dry, water logged, or heavy clay soil, this grain does pretty spectacular in every condition it has been tested in so far. My intention is to get as much of this grain out there moving forward, as people grow it around the world we will learn lots more about it.



[color=black] Zack Weiss,
I am too a big fan of spelt (Dinkel). We (me too) make each week a spelt bread at home. I lived six years in west germany and I learned to love a good bread. I will try it here in North Portugal, in our garden (some thousands quadrat meter). Thanks for saying spelt can produce well in poor soil. You gave me the will to try it. Thanks.
About tanslation, i found in a Sepp book the word in german urkorn (not einkorn) for siberian rye. Urkorn means ancient grain. "Ein" in german is one and "ur" in german is ancient i think. I am not a german. But as You say let the nature be our teacher.
In 2015 I want to have some seeds of the siberian einkorn or urkorn from Sepp from you if it would be possible. I want to be in the list of your seeds guardians. I am already a guardian of Paulo Bessa (Iceland /Portugal) Trim Peters perennial rye, and many others plants and cereals.
North Portugal
Benjamim Fontes
]

5 years ago