Eivind Bjoerkavaag

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since Sep 17, 2012
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Recent posts by Eivind Bjoerkavaag

Here's Richard Perkins answering himself, from minute 18:38:



Basically;

- very broad, and very deep
- over 80 hours of video with content that is not posted on youtube
- the download-option includes the spreadsheets
- you could stay subscribed as long or as short as you'd like
- regular Q&A's
1 month ago
It seems like an option could be to pay for 1 month of the version that includes downloads. Then one could download everything that is made available and go through it in a pace more comfortable. And then if at some point the continuos updates seems tempting to watch, it could probably be done again. Please share if I misunderstood something now.
1 month ago
Hans Muster: The short and honest response from my friend is that if you don't have the money for the training you get a long way with the book and their youtube-channel. Since that sentence is translated into english from norwegian by me, I feel the need to point out that the meaning is not that it isn't worth it for the extra content. The book is one of a kind and the amount of valuable information shared on their youtube-channel is immense.

If you choose to take the online training, please share your experience!
1 month ago
I'm not taking it, as I've already done the internship program there, but I have a friend that are taking it, so I've forwarded your question to him. I'll get back to you with his answer. He also read the book before signing up.
1 month ago
Finally! http://www.ridgedalepermaculture.com/online-training.html

The online course "Making small farms work" is based on, and expanded upon, the brilliant book with the same name. There are probably no better place in the entire world to get this quality of teaching in this range of subjects, which perhaps sounds like a bold statement until you take a closer look at Ridgedal Permaculture Farm and see what Richard Perkins have achieved there. It is surely a world class permaculture farm we should be proud of and use as reference along the lines of the greatest permaculture artisans out there.




CHAPTER​ 1 CONTEXT & INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER​ 2 CREATING A HOLISTIC CONTEXT
CHAPTER​ 3 MAPS AND LANDFORM
CHAPTER​ 4 KEYLINE DESIGN
​CHAPTER​ 5 WATER SYSTEMS
CHAPTER​ 6 TREES & WOODY CROPS
CHAPTER​ 7 BUILDING UP INFRASTRUCTURE/ FENCING
CHAPTER 8 PASTURED BROILERS
CHAPTER 9 PASTURED HENS AND EGG-MOBILES
CHAPTER​ 10 GRASS & GRAZING
​CHAPTER​ 11 BIOINTENSIVE NO-DIG MARKET GARDENING
CHAPTER​ 12  NURTURING THE SOIL FOOD WEB
CHAPTER​ 13 FARM ECONOMY, MARKETING AND PHASE PLANNING

This online course is particularly suited for farmers wanting to transition to permaculture and regenerative farming, but obviously also for those that are not yet succesful farmers but want to become one. After those I'd say it's useful for everyone else as long as they want to learn about pragmatical permaculture where ecologic idealism is balanced with the economic reality. They make a proper income from farming!

Richard Perkins have been hinting on his youtube-channel about making this course available for everyone to take, and now they have landed on a subscription model at a fee of 59EUR/month. So if you are an effective learner and go trough the material quickly it turns out to be really cheap. Even if you're not it will still be a really good price, compared to other online trainings and the intrinsic value.

Personally I haven't taken this particular training, but I've been an intern there and have read the book. Here are a few videos from Richard Perkins' visit to farmers that show what they have achieved after doing this exact course in person at Ridgedale:

A trip to norwegian farmer Tore Jardar Virgenes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJ1lsV7kuDs
An amazing young danish couple that started from scratch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3DiWjvn5Bs
A danish girl doing the impossible in the cold mountains of Norway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylvnyls0pdQ
Going no-dig in England: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nINo1tKQ67I

And here is the original design overview of Ridgedale, as a reference to those of you that didn't bother reading the table of content:

1 month ago
I'm sorry if I come across as a total retard now with this question, but the big red sign in the beginning of the videos threw me a bit off balance: If I can watch them here, does that mean I have paid for access?

edit: Excellent content, by the way. Thanks so much for all you are doing.
1 month ago
I'm also concerned about the moisture, but also be sure to check how the stormwater goes in the area. It would be nicer if it didn't pool on the area where the house is builded. In these places bamboo or concrete often make most sense, so in lack of better knowledge I'd say go for wattle and daub as a test because it will be easier to to fix when necessary. At the very least make sure the roof has a large overhang.
2 months ago
It's not too common to see earth integrated houses for sale, it seems people prefer to keep them, but recently there was one for sale in Oslo, Norway. For those interested I post some pictures here, and add the pdf of the propertysale with more info (in norwegian), floor plan and interior pictures down in the bottom:

2 months ago
Yeah, thanks, and they have a whopping amount of info out... here's their youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/mrintegralpermanence/playlists

Here's the link to their fantasticly practical book "Making Small Farms Work": http://www.makingsmallfarmswork.info/

And they have an online training program for farmers wanting to transition into permaculture. And the youtube channel features some of the farmers that have taken the training and done the transition.

edit (again):

Here's the links to the visits to a few of the farmers that have made the transition after the training program:

A trip to norwegian farmer Tore Jardar Virgenes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wJ1lsV7kuDs
An amazing young danish couple that started from scratch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y3DiWjvn5Bs
A danish girl doing the impossible in the cold mountains of Norway: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylvnyls0pdQ
Going no-dig in England: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nINo1tKQ67I

And there are several videos more of the people doing after their intern program... but I'll leave those for you to find yourself
2 months ago
Ridgedale Permaculture Farm in Sweden! The opening post in this thread asks for examples, and this farm is one of the best. They ackowledge that people need to see the numbers if they are going to jump on the band wagon, so they put in a huge effort in documenting everything they do. And they do great! It is a world class permaculture example, of farm scale permaculture. They balance economy and ecology in an impressive way, and use permaculture design and regenerative agriculture. And pay off their farm in less than five years. That is an example of how to make a living of permaculture.

I was there as an intern an learnt that the hard work it takes is not for me, I'd rather like to go the permaculture homesteading route than the permaculture farming route. I'd rather spend time and resources in beautifying a natural chillout lounge than busting my back in the market garden or dragging lots of Salatin style broiler pens all day. What food I lack from my garden, I'd rather source from elsewhere. And I believe there are more people like me than like the hard working heroes of Ridgedale.
2 months ago