Dee Ann Reed

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since Sep 25, 2012
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Recent posts by Dee Ann Reed

Want to grow these as an annual in zone 7. There are European sources, but reports are the seeds are confiscated. Really want to grow these for herbal use. Also interested in anyone else's experience.
4 years ago
I am planning on using trifolate orange as part of an edge of property hedge I am planning. It will be the outside of the hedge closest to the road. My intent it to create a 30' wide hedge of fruiting trees and shrubs outside of my goat pasture. My hope is that it will be a deterrent to human trespassers. I also, of course, plan to use the fruit.
6 years ago
I am building a home on 30 acres of established woodlands. I will be homesteading, and eating most of my diet from this property. My goal is to add to the ecosystem, and build it into productivity. I will be thinning certain areas for pastures, but leaving some tree structure in place even there.
The acreage is mostly oak and hickory forest. I plan to add fruit, and more nut production. I have also been experimenting with scatter gardening into unfilled soil covered with weed growth.
Last year, I experimentally planted a small heavily grassed paddock with vegetable seed of all kinds. I did harvest quite a lot of vegetables before the weeds took over. The beans, peas, and corn did not do well, but the weather was pretty cool, and we had very late frosts.
Once, I had some pintos in a bucket that a cat had gotten into and peeed in. I took them out and scattered them along the pasture fence. Nearly every one came up. Sadly that year we had bad drought, and they never produced a crop. However they did teach me that it is possible to grow beans without tillage.
So I guess my question is, does anyone have advice on forest production while maintaining existing forest? I did go out there recently and scattered seed all along forest edges, mostly cool weather, greens, and Cole crops.
6 years ago
How much rosemary did you use for your tea?
6 years ago
NEVER till Johnson Grass! I was baptized into Johnson Grass 12 years ago this coming December. I had never dealt with it when I lived in California. I moved to OK, and I was like a babe drawn to the slaughter. Previously, Burmuda, had been my most hated enemy in the garden, but Johnson Grass is Burmuda's big hairy ape of a brother, and now I fight them both! I just had the most disasterous garden ever, after growing an entire plot in turnips for two years, and the fallowing same plot for two more. Thought I had got rid of Mr. Johnson Grass, but No, he was trying to get rid of me. I planted an 80x80 Patch of everything from Tomatoes to goji berries, but it was hopeless. The only thing that did well against the Johnson Grass was its nicer, and infinitely more useful cousin milo! I broadcast the milo, and not a Johnson Grass Plant grew there. Seriously considering growing milo on the whole plot next year! Oh and did I mention I made the mistake of Tilling this year!

So lessons I've learned in my fight: 1) NO TILLING EVER 2) If you have clay soil like mine, forget digging it out! 3) Burning it off helps 4) Add calcium to soil. Johnson Grass tends to grow in low calcium soils. 5) Mega mulching works best! The best is sheet mulching like Back To Eden. Heavy cardboard down in Fall, try two inches thick at least. Massive amounts of wood mulch on top, top dressed with lots of manure, grass clippings, hay, straw, leaves and whatever else you can find! More added in Spring, particularly manure. 6)I got a decent squash crop by clipping Johnson Grass shoots with a hand clipper, everytime I saw one. Finally gave up when heat and squash bugs beat me back!!! 7) Early spring plantings are the mainstay! Cool weather crops beat Johnson Grass by being harvested before it gets a foothold. Crops like Fava beans, peas, and the brassicas are fantastically successful! Consider drip watered containers for tomatoes. They just don't fight the chemicals in Johnson Grass roots well!

Little Bit Farm
7 years ago
Thanks to all who posted on this thread! It is my belief that we need to get back to chickens that can reproduce themselves. There is little to know networking for this. Chickens should be just as "perma"culture as the rest of permaculture. Once again, Thank you!

Little Bit Farm
7 years ago
Having bought a lot of goats, and milked a lot of them here is my advice: 1) First of all, are you feeding her grain while you milk her? You need to. 2) I recommend laying a wire ore bristly brush across the top of the milk pail, and she'll try the laying down thing a few times, and then she'll stop that. As for kicking, sometimes I have had to milk holding a leg in one hand, and milking with the other for awhile. A better option is to nail some short boards to the stanchion, and tie her legs for a couple days. Within a few days, she'll just stop all that. I've never had a goat that didn't calm down after a couple of days.

Little Bit Farm
I haven't owned very many White Rocks. I have seen a few Australorps set, though they are specifically stated on most hatchery sites, not to be setters. I have a friend who has own New Hampshires for years, and never had one set a clutch of eggs. I haven't had luck with very many Barred Rocks. Buff Orpingtons, have been better, but even they, have not been especially reliable. I HAVE seen a few Easter Eggers set. right now I am working on crossing some bantams to some larger chickens. We'll see how it goes. Has anyone found a reliable mixed chicken. I guess I should say, I have been doing this a long time. I am looking for an all round bird, one that sets, lays, and puts on a decent amount of meat.

Little Bit Farm
8 years ago