Nick Dire

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since Nov 20, 2012
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Recent posts by Nick Dire

Well, we're finally moving there after having bought the property a few years back. I'll be boots down in N Idaho after 1 July (2016), so for anyone in the area, why don't we do coffee sometime after the 4th?
3 years ago
Morning all!

I've got just shy of 6 acres in North Kootenai County, about 25 miles S of Sand Point. Looking at a long term development, off grid, probably log house. Really interested in heritage breed livestock (poultry, sheep, waterfowl, and if I can get away with it, a yak!) and maximizing the space with a food forest and hugelculture mounds. If you need to get rid of excess hardwoods or brush, let me know. You can feel free to drop it on my property, just drop me a line. We live full time outside of Seattle right now, but can cross over whenever if others in the area want to get together for a meet and greet this spring or summer.

Nick
6 years ago
CdA - Couer D'Alene. You're 6 or 7 hours south of me..... not too feasable. Good luck!

Thanks

Nick
7 years ago
Sorry if this has been covered already, but the best thing that I've found for the price and general resilience to environmental issues are container houses. There is a company in Seattle - ShelterKraft Werks - www.http://shelterkraft.com/ that has stock plans that can be modified to fit your needs. I've spoken with them on the phone, and hope to get to their office/factory this spring to tour their demo units. These are single story, steel structures that are as weather proof as you can get. The only thing I've found close (and way pricier) are the concrete monolithic domes. If you sing steel anchor plates into a concrete foundation, then weld the structure to those plates, you should be fine. These things do cross the ocean in some of the worst conditions outside of Antarctica.

Good luck,

NickV
7 years ago
Eric - how close are you to CdA? If you are in the area +/- 25 miles, I'd be interested in as much as would fit into my truck (chevy colorado) for a h-mound starter.

Thanks

Nick
7 years ago
So, besides black walnut and mature black locust, are there any other tree types that just shouldn't be in a h-kulture bed?
7 years ago
Great recommendation on the test trees; hadn't thought about that. As far as sheep/goats to contribute, I'm not sure about that as we do have predator signs (as well as plenty of deer and elk lay-down areas). Even with a caretaker swinging by, I don't think that they'd last too long. It'd probably be more efficient to hit the local zoos when they do their stall muck-outs (Zoo Poo sales). A couple of bushels of elephant apples and blammo, plenty of material to work with!
7 years ago
We're about 300 feet above the aquifer, on almost completely level ground. I'd end up needing to figure out how to lay out the pond to best water that area, then dig it out. I'm already looking at a grey water pond once the house is in, so I'm not sure if two pools on the property would best maximize the output of the land. When it's all said and done, we want to support a small flock of Dorset Horned Sheep, heritage turkeys and ducks, a small flock of chickens, and a sizable rabbit population. Not to mention the H Mound gardens and orchard. Self sufficient and able to generate enough revenue to turn a profit, no matter how small.
7 years ago
Long time reader, first time poster!

We have 5.5 + acres in N Idaho, and limited time to work on it. The family plan is to eventually move there, but I need to establish a few things before we get there. In my mind, the initial "crop" I need to get in place are trees - Fruit and Nut - as they will take the most time to mature of anything we plant. Since I have essentially one weekend a month to devote to the property, I am trying to determine the best way to plant and maintain those trees in the dry Idaho summers.

The area is a triangle roughly 300 feet wide (W-E) along the long edge (bottom side that butts against the rest of the property), 90 feet deep at the max from the road to the "bottom" edge and tapers down to a point, with the road bordering on the north side.

We want to plant double rows (Nut trees on the north side, fruit trees on the south side) with complimentary plants in between - more of a edible hedge than food forest in concept, as this will also serve as a wind/snow/privacy structure. We might do triple rows on the fat side, where we have the most footage between the bottom edge and road.

Hugelkulture mounds don't seem to be the right way to go with this, as we are aligned almost perfectly N-S and I want the trees to run W-E. It would seem that a W-E H Mound would cast too much shadow on the N side to be of use (wasted space). I'm also unclear as to whether or not big nut trees should be planted in a H Mound as they are more susceptible to high winds that could knock them over and pull up the mound as well. Lastly, with the space needed between the nut trees, I wouldn't have the heat retention for the nifty micro-climates that occur when the H Mounds are closer together.

SO, here's the question - is there a method I can use to plant the trees while maximizing the retention and absorption of rainfall? There is a well, and in a worse case scenario I can run a solar pump that feeds a drip irrigation system, but would like to look at other concepts first. And the key here is the one weekend per month I can spend on it (outside of the initial set up time, of course).

Thanks in advance!
7 years ago