steve pailet

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since Dec 01, 2012
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Recent posts by steve pailet

look under my email that I used when I purchased.. sorry about that.. dogbreath9@gmail.com       I use the other account for doing may day to day email so that is why you could not find it.  I purchased via pay pal  on jan 18  this year   Transaction ID      9UR78429RB734590F
1 year ago
help need to reset my download.. apparently the cookie got wiped out by my anti virus program. Where do I need to write to do this?
1 year ago
yes thanks.    never said I could spell  
am looking for recommendations on books about humature.
started looking at earth ships years ago.  Decided to do it more conventionally.    Not using tires as they will continue to outgas and I wanted to not deal with anything that would mess with my environment.  So with that in mind.. doing my walls with Rock.. Why rock?  I have access to massive amounts living here in the mountains.     As to your question.. you have the thickness of the tire wall then add 4 to 6 inches per side as needed.. interior walls are thicker as they get coated on both sides.. exterior only on the inside. Why 4 inches?   you generally will be making what turns into a cob wall with straw as a binder.  Think of this the way you would of a plaster wall.  This becomes the scratch coat.  Then you will need to add a finish coat on top to get your finished look.. top coat without the can and such that you would use as fillers in the low spots in the tires.  

As to thickness of interior walls. if you build with wood you will get a thin wall if you build with small tires you will get a smaller thickness if you build with what you use for the back and side walls. you will obviously end up with much thicker walls up to 2 - 3 thick.  This is a nice place to think about timber frame walls as the are thin and beautiful in their own right.

The wall for the green house is likely to end up being 6 inch wall as it is glass and operable glass walls. Consider tempered plate glass as it is more resistant to breaking.  A good choice is glass that is standard dimension.  eg sliding glass door inserts as they are easily available and will keep your cost from going ape doody crazy.  Any time you go with custom your price will double or more. Do not get anything special like low e or argon filled.  You really are looking for glass that will allow for transmission of IR rays to add heat to your back wall as this is what helps to temper your space for passive heating in the winter. .    I would also suggest not going with exterior glass wall that is sloped.  They tend to leak , They will over heat the space and kill your plants.  Note that the majority of green houses actually do have walls that are vertical and the plants grow.. Meanwhile during the summer they still are well vented to keep from over heating.  I would suggest an over hang.  Two things do happen in Taos where they build these experimental buildings.  Huge swing in day and night temperatures and of course There is little water.  

My last comment and another reason I chose to go a more conventional route.. eg cement and not tires.  I can pass code easily.  Do not under estimate this and do not under estimate the huge amount of work needed to pound tires.  Think chain gain hard work only without the chain other than the one that will be around your neck with pounding tires for many many months 9 hours a day
1 year ago
Find this post timely for myself.. I am 63 and have been considering taking the time to go to the community college and learning welding.  Something I have been thinking about for quite a while actually.  What got me thinking about it is I would like to do a stainless still and I see the beautiful hand work.  As a teen I asked my neighbor who was a darn good welder to teach me.  He was a good welder but not much of a teacher.  So 40 years later this is still floating around in my head.
1 year ago
sounds like you have a really knowledgeable designer.  As I was reading your initial comments this is exactly what I was thinking.. decent size heat storage.  single source pump and controllers per zone.  I have always thought that one pump actually draws much less power than several smaller pumps.  Zone actuators to control the flow.
2 years ago
I look at PV panels as not the real cost. It is a combination of things.  Conservation is the biggest life change for most of us.  Think the real cost outside of the ongoing working at conservation is the batteries.  Likely they will need to be changed several times over the life of the house. Granted there are some new solutions coming online.. Saline battery stacks. Inexpensive, can be drawn down to zero charge and not damage the batteries.  Non Toxic as they are salt solution with no lead sulfur or lithium compounds.  They do take up a bit more room physically But because they can be stacked that does help.  No real maintenance. So no need to be the rugged guy.  I anticipate the cost per watt for PV panels will continue to drop some over the next few years.  Currently seeing advertisement at 35 -39 cents per watt if bought in bulk
2 years ago
PV solar has dropped in price dramatically.. If you are rural or have a large open land space that you can install panels  the Technology has changed things a lot .. micro inverters that can drop the price of cabling to the house.  Installing PV on your roof is never a good idea .. Why?  they have to be cleaned regularly.. I for one have had enough time on roofs to know that ONE roofs only last a finite period which normally is less than the life of the PV panels, this means at some point you will need to remove the panels when it comes time to re roof your house. Second more people die around the house from falls off of roof or ladders than you might want to know about.

If you ground mount you can do tracking mounts which means 20% less panels so less area .  Pretty interesting I have been getting emails to buy off grid equipment 5000 watt without the batteries but with inverter and charge controller for around $5000 who knew..   Turns out the batteries are actually more than the cost of the panels.. I am seeing wholesale pv panels in the range of thirty nine to fifty five cents a watt on panels

Once again this does not include any installation work or an electrician
2 years ago
cost of solar water heating.. really depends upon if you are building your own.  If you are buying expect to pay $700 - $1200 per panel.  if you are planning to build first quality home built.  Expect to pay $100 -$200 per very similar output.  Question are you planning on home built heated water storage or are you buying $1000 tanks to hold the water?    Reality.. if you do it DIY  you can pretty well figure $1000 including pipe, insulation, panels, pump, and perhaps power hook up.    So it really depends upon how you wish to do this project.. Pay back time?  with out more information .. 18 months to 18 years.  
2 years ago