Jason Parrish

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since Jan 26, 2013
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Recent posts by Jason Parrish

Good day all, Quick question for the engineer or weekend tinkerer types. What is the ideal cubic foot size for a wood burning stove built on the Scandinavian design? Simple box type with a smoke shelf with primary and secondary air. my flue will be triple wall type going straight up from the first floor through a chase built into the upstairs closet and out the roof 3 feet above the ridge of the house. It will be 26 feet tall so there should be plenty of draft to extract the gasses. I will be building a larger stove to hold fire through the night bit o don't want to make it too big and have to deal with backpuffing or smoking the house up when I add firewood or stoke the fire.
2 years ago
mike, yes you can use zinc covered hvac pipe for your wood stove. however,you will have a huge ammount of creosote buildup inside the pipe if you run it outside.see, the steam off the wood burning will condense in the inside of the pipe because it will reach a piont where the outside temps will cool the pipe below 212 degrees therefore volitiles in the steam will condense,build up layer after layer,and flake off in big sheets inside the pipe.if you use it inside your house,yes,it will burn the zinc off the outside the pipe,but no,it wont hurt anything.also,my current setup at my 2 story rock house is a stick of 6 inch pipe inside a stick of 8 inch pipe and common fiberglass batt insulation packed between the two as an insulating barrier.it keeps the steam from condensing on the inside of the pipe and causing creosote.if you do use it on the inside going to your flue or side exit,put in a tee instead of an elbow,it makes cleanout easier.put a cap on the unused side and pop it off to clean it out.also,if you use it on the outside with no form of insulation and you burn the zinc off the pipe will rust,fast! good luck my friend.
4 years ago
Thanks for the replies, i own lanto evans book on rocket mass stoves, so i am familiar with the technology. However, it's not feesable in the house i am in now.if i am able to build a house i will pour an insulated slab and construct a masonry/russian heater and use pex tubing as radiant floor heating and a stainless steel heat exchanger built into the masonry heater. i agree that a masonry/cob/ thermal mass charged with a hot/clean burning fire is the way to go, it's just not doable where we live now. so that puts me back to using the chimney in the house. i have seen the twinfire heater by wittus and am thinking i would build my version of it. i was hoping for someones input on using or building a downdraft or gasifier type heater. thanks guys.
4 years ago
hello all. i am building a wood stove to replace the one that has succumed to age in my house.i have a two story house,barn style. my last stove i built was based on a scandinavian stove.it served well. however,on really cold spells it was not up to the task of heating the house. i am looking to build a stove that will hold a good ammount of wood for burning through the night,also, it must be able to run mildly and efficiently.i have been looking at downdraft designes,like the newer outdoor boilers,and stoves with rear baffles that force the smoke close to the coals at the bottom rear of the stove. i am a millwright/welder by trade and have heavy fabrication skills,so building the stove wont be a problem. other concerns i have are, what is the correct mix of secondary air to primary air in the firebox,or should it be adjustable to suit how the wood is burning? And it needs to be easy to operate so my wife wont have to be fighting with it while i am on the road working. i know this seems like a tall order, but i have faith in you guys. thanks,Jason
4 years ago