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Mischa Mandel-Giegerich

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since Feb 14, 2013
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Recent posts by Mischa Mandel-Giegerich

Hello all! I live in Southern California and I have a company called UrbanFarms & Permaculture with the goal of converting private property into edible landscapes. The business is doing well and there seems to be considerable demand for the service but I'm looking to branch out a little. Being that I live in a place so hard hit by drought, I'd like to hone my skills in that area. Is there a drylands/native plants landscape design course or a general online landscaping course anyone could recommend/has vetted? I'd like to walk away with a degree or a certificate of some kind. Any help it much appreciated! Thanks!
4 years ago
Hey all! Can anyone tell me what type of lettuce this is?

Thanks!
4 years ago
Great! Thank you!
5 years ago
Hello all! I'm a farmer in the heart of Los Angeles. I have a company that converts private clients' properties into food forests/edible gardens. I have a client that lives on Topanga Canyon, between Malibu and the Pacific Palisades in California who is looking for a reliable and well-trained fruit tree pruner who can come to her house and clean things up. I'd really like to satisfy her so if anyone knows a business that meets that criteria, please let me know, it'd be much appreciated! None of my connections have panned out.

Thank you,
Mischa
5 years ago
Hiya! Thanks for the reply. Whatever it is seems to be particularly interested in the leafy green parts of the plants. Particularly the chard and kale. They seem interested in the squash and cucumber leaves as well. I don't think it's bugs because of the fact that the netting was ripped down and the soil stakes were everywhere and because whatever gets in seems to be interested in digging around in the soil (for bugs?) particularly along the edges of the beds, where the soil meets the wood.
6 years ago
Hey all, I have a pretty simple question that, after some research on the internet, seems like it might have a complicated answer. I'm looking for clarification. I have two raised beds I built for a client and they're just being absolutely devastated by critters. I'm thinking it's raccoons (I've found footprints nearby and I'm thinking they're the only ones that could tear down bird netting like I've found it) and possibly rats and mice because I've found the bird netting undisturbed but the plants are still being eaten. I've decided to build a "swinging door" type cage over the top and I'm considering using 1/4" hardware cloth. A buddy I work with says that'll keep even mice out but when I look it up online there are all sorts of conflicting ideas. Some people say rats and mice can chew right through it or that small mice are still able to squeeze through the holes. Does anyone have a more definitive answer on this? Thanks in advance!
6 years ago
Even better! Thank you!
6 years ago
Thank you all so much! This is really great information. It's in the Pacific Palisades.
6 years ago
Hello all! I've posted once before. I'm an L.A. based permie and I have a client for whom I've planted two citrus trees, a Meyer lemon and a Blood orange. Both organic. Here's my dilemma: the area where I'm planting is on a hill. I've terraced the land. While forming the swale where I was going to plant the trees, I noticed that the earth underneath was full of, what I'm guessing, is limestone. Very chalky, large chunks. It seems to be what the hill is naturally composed of. I read that limestone is an alkalizer and that citrus trees in particular don't take kindly to this kind of soil. I informed the client and we decided to go ahead and plant the trees out anyway. I added an amendment (gardening soil from Kellogg. I know, I'll never use their product again, but it was cheap) and I used organic fertilizer under the root ball and mixed in with the soil. I planted them out about a month and a half ago and while they seem to be doing alright, there is a bit of leaf curl and some of the leaves have turned yellow and fallen off. I'm hoping this is normal transplant shock but my concern is that the limestone is going to kill them or seriously inhibit fruit growth. I believe the trees are already a year old. Are there any natural products I can be adding to the soil to neutralize the alkalizing affects of the limestone? Was it a horrible idea to plant these trees directly into the ground here? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
6 years ago
Good stuff Tom! Thank you so much!
7 years ago