Christine Wilcox

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since Mar 13, 2013
Los Anchorage, near Alaska
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Recent posts by Christine Wilcox

Oysters grow on many substrates. We use sterile grain jars to maintain and transfer spawn. We grow oyster mushroom on straw mostly. Cheap and easy and local. We also like alternating fresh coffee grounds with hydrated cardboard and a high spawn rate in buckets with holes. Some people use hardwood fire pellets. Agricultural waste produce are used worldwide. Oysters grow on almost anything.
1 year ago
Shaggy mane are delicious. They should be great in your area. Should also be wild. They are often in disturbed areas and in lawns.They are very watery, so need lots of cooking to evaporate the liquid, but are the best in cream of mushroom soup or in stroganoff. We also failed to get blewits to grow from spawn.
1 year ago
Love to see some pics Steve. Here are a few from our garden last summer. Wine caps are pretty sneaky, found them a long ways from where they were "planted", but we have wood chip paths and mulch almost everywhere and now all mulch is inoculated with wine cap spawn (just add in the well run wood chips). Also phot of the oyster added to the straw mulch in garden beds and the shaggy manes in the compost that pop up every fall when the temps drop and the rain comes.
1 year ago
That's great. We too have spread wine cap spawn throughout the garden. Mushrooms everywhere. We are also using a well run bed of wine cap mycelium as a treatment for the road runoff.
1 year ago
Hi Corey,
We grow Pleurotus ostreatus, primarily the gray variety. It does well in the temperature ranges we have during the summer/fall and does well in indoor cultivation as well.
1 year ago
Wolf spiders can be effective predators of anything they can catch including my honeybees but there are other common spiders that seem to specialize in eating their arachnid kindred. I have issues with spiders and sharing space with them but when living years ago in a decrepit farm house on the Colorado front range infested with black widows and occasional brown recluse, I came to tolerate the Skytode genus or ‘spitting spiders’. I am not sure which species we had but we nicknamed them the “whirling dervish spider” for the habit of spinning wildly in the small webs they made when alarmed. Our population flourished from good habitat and tolerance but apparently others take this relationship to a more active level as the video shows. A few of the gang followed us up to the Great North, probably on furniture but the population gradually disappeared. The video also shows how they managed to subdue much larger spiders, which was always a mystery at the time we shared space with them.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUCkxUpNcEc
2 years ago
Great for fixing nitrogen. I have read that lupines can be toxic.
2 years ago
Oh yes tons of rhubarb. Yes, jerusalem artichokes, also fuki. Also Chinese artichokes. Gaint bluebells (flowers and leaves are tasty). And yes garlic, best results with Siberian. I also forgot Evans Bali cherry, nanny berry, hawthorn, hascap, and herbs and medicinals. Mushrooms. Lots of wine caps throughout the garden.
You are correct, still zone 3/4. We are about 800 ft above sea level so we are a bit colder and wetter than down the hill.
2 years ago
On our 1 acre homestead, red and black currants are the bumper, reliable fruits. Gooseberries. Apples. Service berries. Aronia. Mtn ash. Sea buckthorn. Raspberries. Nangoon berries. Strawberries. For greens, good King henry and Turkish rocket are super productive. Horseradish. Welch onions and Egyptian walking onions. Calorie crops are still potatoes, carrots, cabbage, of course.
2 years ago