Philomena Eita

+ Follow
since Apr 09, 2013
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
0
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
2
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Philomena Eita

We're working on the same idea, using Osage Orange (called "hedge" for a good reason) along with fruit-bearing bushes on the inside of the thorny hedge. This is to create not only an impenetrable barrier on the outside, but to provide a useful interior crop. Hedge (Osage Orange) a very dense hard wood that burns at a high BTU. We use even the smallest branches for a raging fire in the woodstoves (perfect for cookstoves). It has a tenacious growth habit, causing it to send out multiple thorny branches for each one pruned away. Thus, by planting a small sapling in spring, cutting it down to one inch high that fall, the second year a thorny small hedge is begun. The second fall cut the new growths back to 1-2 inches long. Continue this pattern for 3-4 years. It is worth it as the final hedge is "bull-strong, horse-high and hog-tight" (hedge's claim to fame). We have been doing this during the past three years (two were major droughts). We made the mistake (i.e.- experiment failure) of planting them in small hay bales and too far apart (8-12 inches is the correcxt spacing- we did 24 inches). The droughts dried up the bales (on top of sod), causing some loss. However, the living hedges are mean-looking and treacherous, pointing thorny branches in all directions. These trees grow very quickly.
Last year, we saved hedge seed and plan to replace the empty spots and extend the border further.
I hope this helps. Please google more about this. There are magazine articles from ranchers' experience with growing hedge in the 1800s a predator/cattle/people-proof borders in the Midwest.
5 years ago