Melany Vorass

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since Apr 10, 2013
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Recent posts by Melany Vorass

Hey all, I see this thread is quite ancient. I came across it while looking for opportunities to talk about urban foraging near Missoula. If anyone's still interested, please hit me up. I just authored a book "The Front Yard Forager" on the subject and teach workshops up and down the west coast. I'm looking for an excuse to visit Missoula this summer.
6 years ago
... and if you call it an 'intentional garden' as I do, you can get by with really growing your lawn out!
7 years ago
This is what I think of when I hear the words "a well kept lawn."
7 years ago
All the edible weeds, plus a little bit of grass (also edible): clover, dandelion, catsear, sheep sorrel, nipplewort, common mallow, creeping woodsorrel (Oxalis corniculata), shotweed, chickweed, deadnettle. A few medicinals too - feverfew, yarrow.
7 years ago
I just finished reading it, loved it, and learned a ton. (To think I believed heirlooms were always the better choice!) Though it undoubtedly has some use as a varietal guide for the gardener, I think it's best used for determining what to shop for in the grocery store or farmers' markets. I agree, it's an excellent book, thoroughly researched and well laid out.
7 years ago
Seaweed Harvesting Workshop
Hi Cascadians, I'm giving an edible seaweed I.d. workshop next month. If you're interested in attending, I'd love to have you! You can sign up through Seattle Tilth at http://seattletilth.nonprofitsoapbox.com/calendar/event/119
7 years ago
Mark, I tried that and it did not work for me. At all. I also tried sprouting them. Nope.

I'm not sure about this, but I'm thinking (as with amaranth and quinoa) the slightly bitter taste is from saponins. There are many different kinds of saponins (digitalis is one of the poisonous ones used medicinally for heart medication), but I'm guessing this saponin falls into the good category of cholesterol reducers. Leaving the husks on, eating it as a whole food, probably adds nutritional benefit (which makes it easier for me to get past my taste buds ; )
7 years ago
Hi all, anyone have advice on food bearing vine I can cover my wire fence in? (this is not cyclone fencing, it's 2x4" rectangles wire fence, stout, but wouldn't stand up to grapes I don't think. I have no experience with pawpaw or passionfruit. Thoughts? Thanks!
Check my blog for detailed info on catching, dressing and cooking. I hope you are not offended by my drowning method. It may sound cruel, but after MUCH, MUCH, MUCH, MUCH research, I'm very comfortable with it as the most humane method, especially for city squirrels. http://www.essentialbread.com/2011/10/meat-mr-squirrel.html
7 years ago
I know this string is ancient, BUT... I've tried every which way under the sun to remove those pesky husks. Finally, I used my flour mill to grind the whole shitncaboodle. I use it cup for cup as replacement flour, but I only replace 1/3 of whatever recipe's flour requirement. I detail this in my forthcoming book (available on amazon for pre-order), The Front Yard Forager.
7 years ago