Michael Qulek

+ Follow
since Oct 22, 2013
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
2
In last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
50
Received in last 30 days
0
Total given
0
Given in last 30 days
0
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand Pioneer Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Michael Qulek

I bought seaberry seedlings from the folks at Burnt Ridge. They sell a bundle of 10 seedlings for 35$. That's the route I took and my plants are already bearing fruit while still in pots.
http://www.burntridgenursery.com/Seaberry/products/43/
2 years ago
You've probably seen some of my other posts where I've complained about all the animal damage to my trees. Deer strip the leaves, mice peel the bark, and squirrels and raccoons eat the fruit. On tree was completely knocked over by a bear. Finally a have an answer to protect my fruit from preditation. My wife's nylon stockings! Here's a pic of a Stanley plum with the branch covered with a stocking (uh, knee high).


Here is whats under the nylon

This is the one and only branch on the tree that still has fruit on it. The rest of the tree is stripped bare. As are almost all the other trees in my orchard.

Put the nylon on while the fruit were still tiny and green. Think they'll be ripe in a few more weeks.

The most amusing part was when I asked my wife for some of her stockings. You should have seen the look she gave me!
2 years ago

R Ranson wrote:

Almonds start producing nuts at about five years old, and really get into the swing of things at about 10 years. One single, healthy and happy tree, can produce 30 to 50 pounds of nuts per year! For 50 years! That's... let's see... 1500 to 25 hundred pounds of nuts for the life of one tree. Depending on where in the world you are, that's about one tonne! At that rate, I only need four trees to keep me happy.


OK, the first order of business here is a reality check. I like almonds too, but my trees produced NOTHING at all for the first 6 years. They are between 8 and 9 years old now, and one of two of the trees are just STARTING to bear a few almonds. How many of my own almonds have I eaten so far. ZERO! Animals have so far taken every single last kernel! Do not expect to be drowning in almonds any time soon. It just ain't gonna happen.

R Ranson wrote:
I know we can grow them from seed, so long as the nut is fresh and untreated. There are a few tricks like carefully shelling them and making them feel like they had a proper winter. We could even use grocery store almonds, apparently. Can anyone tell us what we are looking for when buying almonds for seeds?


I've just purchased raw almonds at the store and planted those straight in the dirt. That's what Luther Burbank did 120 years ago to start his first orchard. I use almond seedlings as my grafting rootstock for peaches, plums, and apricots. I noticed that some will want to sprout right away, and some needed a bit of winter chill (Riverside+30F in January) before they emerged.

Don't bother with trying to root cuttings unless you have a 100% humidity climate-controlled mist chamber. It just doesn't work.

R Ranson wrote:

What growing conditions do almonds want? Are there different kinds of almonds suited to different parts of the world? Do almonds need a friend to exchange pollan with or are they self fertile? If they need a friend, can that friend be a clone - or are there defences that prevent incestual nut procration?

They want the same growing conditions as peaches, since they are the same species. They need some winter chill, but not much. You'll be successful with almonds anywhere within the zone 7-9 climate types.

R Ranson wrote:
Do almonds need a friend to exchange pollan with or are they self fertile? If they need a friend, can that friend be a clone - or are there defences that prevent incestual nut procration?

Some varieties are self-fertile, but some prefer cross-pollination. If you want four trees, get four varieties. You can find anything you want mail-order.

R Ranson wrote:
And the most important question of all: Since I know I can bud a plum tree onto an almond rootstock, can I bud an almond onto a plum rootstock?

Can't say definitively, but I have grafted Japanese plum onto almond rootstock, so I assume you can graft almond onto plum. Just how much plum seed do you have? I'd say the easiest route is to just buy raw almonds, plant those, and graft them the following year.

Good luck.
2 years ago

Jason Matthew wrote: The blueberries are doing fantastic this year (middle).


I think this might be be biggest clue. blueberries like really acidic conditions, they like growing best at a pH around 5.5. Maybe your soil is too acidic for the other trees. You can get a simple soil testing kit at Home Depot or Orchard. It costs about 10$. If your peaches are deep green, then I would not say nitrogen. But, a test kit will tell you that. The one I picked up tests pH, N, P, and K.

I general, trees like full sun the whole day, but they do NOT like wet feet. If your swales are retaining too much water, they may be suffering from oxygen starvation.
2 years ago
Hello Ann

I'm in the Sierra Nevada at about 5000 feet, and I have two Jujubies, Lee, and Lang. They are planted in deep silty-loam, with about 24-30 inches of topsoil. It snows in winter, about zone 6 with lows in the teens. My jujubies, though surviving the winter cold, do suffer from some dieback, and aren't growing lushly like the apples and peaches are. After 4 years, the two trees are more or less the same height they started out at, when planted. I've gotten a few fruit, but not even enough for a filling snack.
2 years ago
"Natives ... drill a 5 centimeter hole into the 1-meter thick trunk and put a bung into it. Every 6 months or so, they remove the bung and collect 15 to 20 liters of the hydrocarbon.

Please note the underlined areas. Let's assume you've got seeds in hand ready to plant. Just how long is it going to take to get a tree with a trunk a meter in diameter? Assuming you can get by with 20 liters of fuel per week, that means you'll need at least 25 of these 1 meter wide trees to provide you with a minimal supply other the course of a year. Maybe an acre of sunflowers would be more productive.
2 years ago
Yellowhorn has edible leaves, flowers, and nuts. Honey Locust produces high protein pods that might be eaten as a green vegetable when young. Black Locust also produces flowers that are edible, and the foliage can be used as animal fodder. I've read that sweet potato leaves make a good green vegetable, but haven't tried them yet.

One wild plant in my location is Miner's lettuce, which is dead-simple to identify, even by little children. I like to stir-fry it like spinach with anchovies and a little oyster sauce. Milkweed and nettle are also present in my area, but I havent't gotten around to trying those yet. Miner's lettuce is very, very high on my importance list, because I start seeing it in January near the base of the mountain on the southern sides, where as I can find it in June on the north slopes at higher elevation. That's the one green vegetable that is easy to find during the period of the year with the least number of fresh choices.
2 years ago
I might add that not telling us your geographic location produces very little value in any potential response you might get. Sandy soil in Florida will get treated differently than a sandy soil in northern Michigan. If you want valuable, in-depth answers, you'll have to start out with an in-depth description. I'm talking about things like USDA zone, winter lows, summer highs, annual rainfall, the percentage of the rainfall during the growing season, ect. If you can't give substantial answers to the questions above, you might want to reconsider this whole undertaking.

Personally, I wouldn't bother paying money to have an analysis performed on my soil, when I can/have done it myself with a Home Depot test kit. Any discrepencies between the somewhat crude Home Depot results and a commercial test are likely to be lost in the noise of local weather variables.

Likewise, the things you want to grow will also have their own personal demands. What a cabbage wants is quite different from what a blueberry bush wants. In the real world, what you'll find is that you have to work with what you've got and you have to make very substantial changes to adapt your site to grow anything you can think of.
2 years ago
You might want to dig up a random tree or two and physically check the condition of the roots. If indeed they were planted with coiled roots from being pot-bound, it's not a problem that's going to solve itself. What geographic region are we talking about here? What is the soil like? One thing I can tell you for sure is that chestnuts don't like soil that is the least bit alkaline. I think that should be the first thing to check. You want to acidify the soil around your chestnuts and supplement them with soluble metals like zinc and iron. The fertilizer IRONITE is a good choice here. Do you know how to identify metal deficiency in chestnut? Look for yellowing leaves that have bright green veins. I've solved that deficiency by making a soluble iron spray with 0.5% Ferrous Ammonium Sulfate which I actually sprayed on the trees. Add a drop of detergent to make it stick to the leaves better. Seen a positive response to that within 2-3 days.
2 years ago