Jules Harrell

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since Feb 26, 2014
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Long story short, married with grown children, happy on a homestead farm. Love to share with young folks who want to learn how to live this way. I teach natural horsemanship and train damaged horses who are rescued from kill pens. My daughter has moved home to learn how to train horses and work on our small homestead farm.
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upstate NY near MA/VT
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Recent posts by Jules Harrell

Horse folk wanted to stay with us this summer, help out on the land (150 acres) and learn to train horses. I also trim our herd of 5 every 3 weeks. No bits stalls shoes or blankets.

We are wwoof hosts, Cherry Plain Sanctuary Farm, Hipcamp hosts same name.Our site is www.heartsinhandhorsemanshipllc.com.

Jules Horsewalker on Facebook, Hearts in Hand Horsemanship LLC on youtube.

Want to come hang out with us? Drop me a moosage let's talk horses!

Horse loving farm helpers with or without their own RV or van are also welcome to contact me. Leashed dog and cats considered, children welcome. Thank you! Jules
2 weeks ago
Horse folk wanted to stay with us this summer, help out on the land (150 acres) and learn to train horses. I also trim our herd of 5 every 3 weeks. No bits stalls shoes or blankets.

We are wwoof hosts, Cherry Plain Sanctuary Farm, Hipcamp hosts same name.Our site is www.heartsinhandhorsemanshipllc.com.

Want to come hang out with us? Drop me a moosage let's talk horses! Also Jules Horsewalker on Facebook, Hearts in Hand Horsemanship LLC on youtube.

Horse loving farm helpers with or without their own RV or van are also welcome to contact me. Leashed dog and cats considered, children welcome. Thank you! Jules
2 weeks ago
Hi everyone. Our last woofer is here for two weeks then our loft is available till November. Couple or single. We do alot with our 4 horses and I train killpen rescues for other people. Huge garden. Goats llamas dogs cats bees. We are longterm woofer hosts. Come visit and enjoy our farm with us. Jules www.heartsinhandhorsemanshipllc.com
11 months ago
Hi congrats on working towards homesteading and welcome to this forum. Have you considered just hiring someone to do the work you need done? Lots of time cheap rent plus work doesn't translate. I figure you could get a local handy man to do the projects then continue on with your private homesteading...Jules
11 months ago
Also good on you for strong boundaries!!!
11 months ago
My advice is to start small, with one animal type. I suggest goats. First secure your fencing, pasture, hay (especially for winter) and shelter. Give them more space than you think they need. I use electric fencing for summer (3 joule is only solar choice that keeps goats inside) as well as permanent fencing for winter. Figure out what goat keeping means before moving to chickens, pigs and cattle. Secondly, find a sister or brother farmer and apprentice with them. No amount of books or you tube videos will prepare you for the injuries, the escaped animals, the babies born outside in 10 degree weather, the need to milk mama to keep her babies alive who's udders wont drop and whose teats wont fill, the dehydrated babies with the runs who you have to force rehydrate, worms, bloat and hoof issues inherent in livestock farming. Start with one type, goats are the easiest and most hardy, use their poop and old bedding in your garden, and help a farmer out while you learn. Jules
1 year ago

Michael Cox wrote:Just an observation about your fire, and how conventional stoves work.

In my woodstove we have primary air - fed from below, directly into the ember zone of the fire - and secondary air - fed from above. My observation is that too much primary air actually hinders getting a steady fire going. The embers burn through incredibly quickly, and away to nothing. Without the good bed of embers it is challenging to get a clean burn on the wood added above. If adding an air supply below I would recommend making sure you have some way to control the flow.



Thank you Michael, good advice. We heat primarily with wood here and understand how venting and fresh air work to maintain a bed of coals in a woodstove. Even so, it took a bit of research to figure out the ideal situation for a low tech fire ring set up. The fire you are seeing in these pics left such a strong bed of hot coals I was finally forced to pour a couple gallons of water on them before I could leave the tipi.

I highly recommend this fairly inexpensive and simple DIY model for a hotter fire with less smoke, both inside the tipi and outside in your yard. In fact, we are setting up another fire pit just like this one on a different spot for folks to use. It's a safe contained fire and you can chill out while not getting repeatedly blasted with smoke. We only buy the really heavy inner ring with a lip and the fairly heavy outer ring. The inner ring must fit well inside the outer for the lip to be effective. Jules
1 year ago

Glenn Herbert wrote:I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.



I am always glad when permies admin merges threads because you see the big picture. This makes it easier for us to find the right forum. Thank you.
1 year ago
Hi there. Well yes tipi ceremonies can vary dramatically. Been to many over the years, always by invitation, always with respect for traditional ways. Ive actually never heard of a 'purification' ceremony in a tipi with hot rocks. Assuming that was a sweat lodge. Yes it can be risky messing around with old ways. Best to go straight to the source. Our longterm tipi family are native peoples in Maine, some living on Indian Island. Tipis (and we have owned many) are notoriously smokey. You are right the pit in the hole was not ideal, which is why i was thinking Dakota firepit tunnels. Dakota firepits and rocket stoves and smokeless fire pits all fascinate me. Regardless of the names each have valid science behind them, namely making the fire hotter so there's less smoke. We, my husband and I, decided ultimately on the DIY smokeless fire pit concept. We bought two rings, one with a lip. He drilled holes in each ring, outer ring holes at the bottom, inner ring holes near the top. Well it works! The smoke is about half what it was, with the added bonus of not moving around the tipi even with the door open and no liners. I believe with a liner and the door closed we will have an even sweeter set up. The smoke flaps were closed in the previous photo because we didn't have a fire. We normally leave them closed to maintain a dryer interior. This is the fire on a rainy windy day in the northeast. Our tipi is next to the horses and we use it for our youth programs here at Hearts in Hand Horsemanship. Jules
1 year ago
Love your hugel mound. What we do here is hugel over time. As we clear brush here on our mountainous 150 acres, within the 22 fenced acre horse yard, we build piles of brush. Then we scoop poop part of the year and pile it on top of the brush piles. The sun makes it thru the clouds on occasion (northeast) and eventually we have green oasises within the steep mountain forest. Within these we begin to see little plants grow that have not been here before. It's kind of cool. These mounds also divert the river torrents of rainfall and allow us to landscape as it were. Love the hugels. Jules www.heartsinhandhorsemanshipllc.com
1 year ago