Joshua Myrvaagnes

pollinator
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since Mar 20, 2014
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kids trees urban
Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Recent posts by Joshua Myrvaagnes

My cousin somewhat recently had a tragic loss.  She needs to be treat with a lot of respect, given the circumstance, but there is an opportunity for some true progress here: she's just posted that she's looking for recommendations for a landscaper, and I would love to find a permaculture landscaper for her.

I don't want anyone pushing permaculture on her, I want sensitivity to her wishes.  At the same time, I know she cares about the world and there's a learning opportunity for someone who can create edible landscaping rather than vapid, and work with her in a life-giving way.  We're really not in contact much, so you'd need to ask her some questions about her desires for her land and listen, listen, listen.  If anyone's up for this I'd like to have a brief conversation with you first before passing on your info to her.  Please send me a purple moosage. Please pass this on to people who do good work or post recommendations I can follow up on here.  

Thanks.
1 week ago
Great responses everyone!

A few points:

my thought was you can light the candle and then put it out when you leave.  Problem: someone might forget.  Possible solution: really short wick that you have to adjust before each use.  You could cheat, but you'd have to do something active, passively it will just go out on its own after 5 minutes.

Methane--I'm assuming the quantity that is coming out is not that large--we're not talking about a biogas digester here, just intestinal gas...you know, from all those sunchokes. :)  Am I missing something? Willow feeder model?  I envisioned this as for the indoor pooper with small bucket you take outside once a week--but still it's a bit of a chill.  Coleman lantern seems way overkill, and I wnat to do this without electricity if possible and without possibly-toxic gick.  

Toilet seat indoors by the stove--no, the objections raised by the Yukon poster make sense.

Something natural, insulative, easily cleaned even without paint...sound like the birch is the best one so far, but the cleaning part is still slightly dicey.

Squatting--I can squat, but I can't squat over a 5-gallon bucket.  I'd at least need some framework around it.  Other Americans usually cannot squat.  Elderly people would probably not be able to access the contraption.  

Great input everyone, keep it coming!

Greg, did you do the test?
2 weeks ago
I was thining of how to warm a toilet seat, and this idea is what has come to me:  tiny tea lights below either side of the O -shaped seat: xOx, where the butt cheeks land more or less, and the part of the seat that's there having either a) metal wrapped around to conduct heat up from the candle to the top of the seat there or b) actually put a hole in the middle of the wood of the seat and then metal over that, if the heat won't transfer fast enough.  

problems--it might get too hot (from Google I see a candle is 70 watts's worth of heat, which could burn you; solution: put it a bit farther away?)

flame inside a wooden structure (outhouse)--problem: obvious.  solution:   maybe there could be a really bad candle that burns itself out after 5 minutes?


other interesting points: if you want to reduce methane, or even smell in general, a flame is a good way to do that.  

This would be for an indoor, winter pooper situation.

Thoughts?
3 weeks ago
Yes, those are good.  What I had in mind was a plain old resistance wire without any bulb around it...I guess a resistor but a bit larger than most resistors and not too insulated?  I don't know how hot a regular resistor gets.  
I'm thinking I could probably get a TV that's thrown out on the street and take parts out of it.  

Creighton Samuiels wrote:

Joshua Myrvaagnes wrote:
Don't hate me Paul, but I am prepared to switch to CFL.  Why? the heat is still plenty (13 watts), and it is less likely to burn me in the middle of the night.  The mercury is a sunk cost, the manufacture, the light is not affecting me as it's under my blanket...so may as well use it for what it wasn't designed for: heat.  I hope we all appreciate the irony here.  (Wouldn't it be nice if there were mini resistance heat elements that could be got cheap/free? I'm thinking of pipe heating tape that's for preventing pipes from freezing...or Christmas lights)  I had thought Paul was stretching the numbers to make his point with the original article--now I think he was being actually very conservative, we can easily go much further.



Here's a pack of 6...

https://www.amazon.com/Decorative-Incandescent-Medium-Standard-Household/dp/B079J57616/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1544824554&sr=8-8&keywords=15+watt+incandescent+light+bulbs

They are available in 7 watt as well.  And colors, if that's your thing.

1 month ago
One friend had an issue with breathing cold air (she has poor heating in her room, not by choice but because of lack of insulation and her radiator is farthest from the furnace).  The cold air would irritate her throat.  I had a thought that maybe something like a candle heater under a tiny bit of water--like those essential oil "diffusers"--might be the ticket.  Of course, you'd want to block out the light so it doesn't wake you.
1 month ago
re: candle heater

I LOVE that candle idea!  I was thinking there has to be a way to trap that heat--using a candle to start a rocket mass heater had produced more heat than I expected.  I was picturing showing up at services with a 55 gallon metal drum...oops, no carrying on Shabbas anyway.  A ceramic thingy is more viable--will a mug work?  I might try that.  (For folks who don't know, on Shabbat (Saturday) observant Jews do not light candles or build a fire of any kind, including turning on an electric appliance, but you are supposed to light 2 candles right _before_ Shabbat begins and then let them burn for the whole day. So, along with the wattage of our bodies
1 month ago
UPDATE--we had NO GAS HEAT in the whole house for two days and I was toasty warm (they were replacing the furnace).  I even woke up overheated at one point.  (This is not as good as it sounds--though better than the opposite problem.  The issue is regulating temperature, I don't want a heating system that wakes me up in teh middle of the night.)  

The total wattage I am using is 60+6, generally speaking.

The 40-watt add-on is too much, generally, I mostly only use it for a few minutes when I really need it but it gets too hot to touch quickly and it has burned my sheets a few times.

Don't hate me Paul, but I am prepared to switch to CFL.  Why? the heat is still plenty (13 watts), and it is less likely to burn me in the middle of the night.  The mercury is a sunk cost, the manufacture, the light is not affecting me as it's under my blanket...so may as well use it for what it wasn't designed for: heat.  I hope we all appreciate the irony here.  (Wouldn't it be nice if there were mini resistance heat elements that could be got cheap/free? I'm thinking of pipe heating tape that's for preventing pipes from freezing...or Christmas lights)  I had thought Paul was stretching the numbers to make his point with the original article--now I think he was being actually very conservative, we can easily go much further.

It is December, we had temperatures in the 20s during this time, and my housemates heated the rest of house with space heaters (not my idea, but I kept my door shut and only heated myself, not my room.)  Our neighbors are awesome and generous and came through for us!

I do use the 40W bulb a bit to heat some of the air, and give me nighttime (reddish) light.  The air is above the bed, about 4 feet below the ceiling, so I get the heat trap effect.

I'm at a total of about 200 -300 watt-hours per evening, I estimate.  It's really astonishing how little it takes when you contact the heat source directly.

Also, this is using materials I already had, I only bought one thing (the dog bed heater) and haven't used that for sleeping, only for working sometimes.  It's far far far too big, it should be the size of the soles of my feet and no bigger.  A big step forward, but I wish they would design things that were more congruent.

Again, 200-300 watt-hours per night I estimate, in 20-degree weather, with the rest of the house heat also not gas-heated.
1 month ago
Thanks, that's a good point about 212 on the corn bag.  I think the issue is that they dry out too much if we don't moisten them.  And I also had this notion that microwaves only heat water molecules.  But if that's not the case, then we should moisten them only when they're _not_ about to be heated (microwaved).  For example, when you're done with it in the morning, moisten it and then leave it to absorb its moisture.  (I forget why my landlady's concerned about their becoming too dry, but she said that at some point.)

1 month ago
Yes, this is a good point, Jay, and there is also the embodied energy in building those servers, and the fact that the cost of those monetarily is hidden from view by the fact that most of the companies building infrastructure (or the ones who indirectly fund their creation) are traded at such a remove from their actual value that the "bill" doesn't come in for decades.  The main point being removing ourselves from the feedback in our systems hampers our real learning.


Jay Angler wrote:I thought I'd particularly point out this quote in the article:

Cloud-based gaming, in which graphics processing is conducted on remote servers, is especially energy intensive, increasing overall electricity use by as much as 60 percent for desktop computers and 300 percent for laptops.


I believe I'm interpreting this accurately, in which case it's reminding people that their *own home* energy gaming footprint is only part of the issue, and can be controlled by only playing games that are isolated on their own computer. Any of those multi-player on-line games require a server somewhere out there that is gobbling electrons at a great rate, and I suspect that's what that "60%" electricity increase is referring to, but I'm not knowledgeable enough to be sure.

Do we have any permies out there who could hazard some intelligent guesses about how much electricity game servers are consuming? How much electricity is the server equivalent of permies dot com consuming anyone? (That doesn't mean I'm at *all* suggesting permies shouldn't carry on - at least we're getting people thinking about better ways of doing things! I'm just curious.)

1 month ago
Here is one  question, I'll post more later, I had posted about wofatis, and I'll gather the answers I've gotten from people who've acutally seen them later when I have time:


does it have to be on a hill or on a slope?  if a slope, maybe "upslope" and "downslope" would be clearer?



1 month ago