Win a Fokin hoe blade this week in the Gear forum!

Anna Holmes

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since Apr 29, 2014
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Recent posts by Anna Holmes

Hi Angie, I had free range chickens in the size you mention, and it was a real challenge. I think the comments on a chicken tractor being the best way to go is right, and i am building one at the moment, for the 3 birds i am about to buy (to replace the last ones that were got by the fox). They really tear up the garden, and also their droppings aren't great in that size space if you have visitors or small children! I also lost the eggs, as I was never sure where they were laying them, and would eventually find them weeks later. At the moment, I'm trying to make a chicken tractor out of the ribs of an old tent covered in chicken wire, that i will be able to move easily in the garden. No idea if this will work, if it does i will post pictures! I want something i can move easily on my own, and give them fresh dirt to scratch in every few days, while keeping my plants safe.
Good luck!
4 years ago
Thanks Luke, great info. What would you plant in that situation? We are in UK, no idea what zone, keep meaning to look it up! I was thinking a kale crop or something like that, but that would be probably more seasonably appropriate later in the year. I was wondering maybe about turnips which or beetroots... they both come up pretty quick here at that time of year, and the beetroots would have the extra benefit of leaves attached.
4 years ago
Thanks Luke, that's exactly what i was thinking of doing, in terms of subdividing the space into 5 or 6 areas and move through it slowly.

With the tamworths, I've read that they can be a bit hard for a beginner to handle. Something to do with temperament, or being a little boisterous, boar-like or something. Would you agree?
4 years ago
Hello everyone, i'm a first time pig keeper and looking to get 2 or 3 weaners in the next few weeks to grow mainly to root up 1/4 acre of pasture that i can grow in for my market garden, but also to freeze and eat when we harvest them.

My question is, what would be the best breed for me to go for, to make sure they root the soil, rather than graze. And preferably be able to harvest at 6 months age, rather than slower growing.

I'm in the UK and have seen a lot of adverts for Gloucester Old Spot or Oxford Sandy Blacks, just want to make sure these will do the job. Thanks for your advice!
4 years ago

Burra Maluca wrote:When I was chasing this over ten years ago, one of the criteria was to the proposed business be likely to generate a 'living wage', which was then considered to be £10,000 a year. Plus you had to demonstrate why you needed to be on the land.

I'm not sure how things have changed, but maybe that will help point you in the right direction.



Thanks Burra. Did you get PP? I'm wondering if i can seen any examples of how people demonstrated they needed to be on the land.
4 years ago
Hi Everyone,
this is my first posting to this forum, although i've been reading the posts, and loving them, for years.

I live in the UK and have made the decision to buy some acres (anything between 3 to 10) and get permitted rural development planning permission for them to build a home.

My question is, has anyone else reading this forum done this? Planning permission for a dwelling in the UK is almost impossible to get on agricultural land, but if you present a decent business plan for an agriculture business and a sound explanation of why you need to live on the land, the planning permission is often granted.

I want to start an organic, permaculture-based market garden, growing vegetables to sell at farmers markets in North London and Cambridgeshire. I would use livestock in a permaculture sense to help manage the land, and keep the by-products for my family. I'd love any advice on how i can present the best case for needing to live on the land - i.e. be there for frost protection, growing plants from modules, hardening them off etc. I'd also love to hear from anyone in the UK who might have been through this process, who could maybe give some advice?

To buy a smallholding here costs upwards of £500,000. I can buy five acres of land in the region of £100,000 and put a caravan on it, and with two small children and little money this is my only option to make the dream happen!

thanks everyone,
Anna
4 years ago