Ethriel Riverstone

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since Sep 28, 2014
North Carolina 7b, 8a
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Recent posts by Ethriel Riverstone

Thank you for that information. I didn't think about urine soaking into the flooring but I'm sure I would notice that. Good to know now then to be frustrated later rebuilding parts. I thought wire may be fine since cages are made that way for the small house pet and they do fine usually. I tend to over think things but I'd rather ask the dumb questions than needlessly hurt my animals. Thank you.
6 years ago
Hmm, I was considering to have a fish pond at some point. Sounds like that may be another handy way to get rid of scraps that I never thought of. Surprise there, learning so much. I'll have to look into that more when I'm ready to see what kind of fish we'd like to eat along with what they can do for me..lol I love animals that multi-task!
6 years ago
Oh wow, I didn't even think of the chickens. I don't think I'll have pigs...if I do I'm sure it would only be like two miniature since the family likes those... and probably pets. The head can be fed to dogs and cats though you'd have to grind it up for cats. I kinda forgot about the arms and legs too. Ok, well it certainly looks like rabbits are a very good food source to feed many around the homestead. Thank you.
6 years ago
My question is a little off topic but I'm new in the rabbit world (at research stage still). The fencing for rabbits....I understand most people use fencing for the floor to keep prey out of the coop or whatever the rabbit equivalent for a home is. Does the fence hurt their feet at all or do you place hay or something on top for them to walk on? I've wondered the same for chickens which I don't have yet either but plan to. I'm such a softy for their well being which I know you all are as well. Most homesteader types care more about their health than any profit. I am learning a lot from these forums and all your experience so thank you.
6 years ago
When you process a rabbit for meat, if you are discarding the stomach and intestines, what do you do with them? Do you just throw them in the compost pile for garden fertilizer? I guess I'm wondering if the same is done for all types of livestock. I hadn't considered raising rabbits until recently. I've been researching healthier foods for my cats and it turns out rabbits are great for that. Basically, the cats can eat the whole rabbit except the stomach and intestines so there wouldn't be any waste besides that. I'm very green with raising my own livestock so any advice is welcome.
6 years ago
Thank you Allen and Jay! I've never seen it done that way before but it seems way better to me.
Wow! Was that bits of wool and sphagnum moss that they stuffed into the cracks between logs? Very impressive.
Thank you for the fencing suggestions. I plan to have a small barn type structure for them to rest, take shade, etc.... Also, I'm not sure what wildlife is in the area so I want them to have a safe place to be. Once I have my crops planted and growing, I plan to have an area or few for them to forage on occasion. I will be planting crops for my family to live on as well as the animals and to help the soil. So their should be plenty once things have grown to a good portion. I plan to use feed (minerals, etc...) also so they have a rounded diet to stay healthy. I will keep working the fence until it works. It is great to have all these suggestions from people who have been there and done that. The only reason I would get rid of any animals is if I could not keep them healthy. If I found I was endangering them then I would find a safe home for them but I don't see that happening. I already take care of many animals though not goats and not large cattle. I know it will be more work but they are adorable and can provide meat and milk if I go that route. I'm pretty sure I will be milking at some point.
I think I'm in trouble. I can already see that I will most likely end up with more goats than I wanted. They are so dang cute! The real trial will be to see if I get the fencing right to keep them on my land. I will take it nice and slow and see how I do. Thank you for that info. I'll have to look for longer milking breeds and of course give them enough down time as well.
Yes, there is that too. Some elders do things just because it was how they were taught and there is no better way for them. I agree, it is a hit and miss when following their advice. The only real test is whether it provides results for you. I did some looking and from what I found on crop perspective was:

Leafy vegetables and flowers that produce yield above ground and don't rely on extensive root development do fine when planted during the waxing moon.

Crops that produce their yield below ground, root vegetables such as beets, carrots, parsnips, potatoes, onions and turnips do better planted during the waning moon. This position of the moon encourages development of root growth and tree bark instead of forcing the plant to proliferate above ground before it has a strong grounding. Saplings with firmly established roots are less in danger of damage and deterioration due to loss of branches or top growth during the winter.

Full moon planting creates more moisture in the soil so in droughts it advises to plant closer to this time. The waxing moon is the time to encourage rapid new growth. If you want to retard or control growth, or encourage hardy rooting, perform the necessary activities during the waning moon.

Whether that gives more crop or not and does better I have no idea but it seems to be a strong conclusion by many supposed research. I don't have an area to garden at the moment but I will try it in the future to see the results now that I am curious. lol

For bow making, some natives cut the wood during the new moon on a high hill. The way the water drains makes the grains in the wood tighter, which in turn makes casting time faster for shooting.

6 years ago