Andrew Hedman

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since Oct 11, 2014
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Recent posts by Andrew Hedman

Kdan Horton wrote:We have it like mad. I notice it's not so bad where the wild muscadine grow. Where the vines were really thick on the trees, I chopped off about four feet of the vine but only in the winter. I can't even look at the stuff without a majour rash. I just live with the itch. Two weeks of itchy whenever I'm exposed and try not to be exposed. But in the summer, I usually have a patch somewhere on my body. Wash your hands really well with a super caustic soap helps. Until the skin starts peeling off your fingers...Better than having poison Ivy rash on your winkie though. That's my motto.

As for a preventative, I find whiskey works really well. Maintain a mellow healthy buzz all summer and it's easier to resist going out to work in the woods.



I live in southwest Florida, and agree wholeheartedly with your motto. Once as a child I had swelling on my face and neck so bad that my pediatrician prescribed steroids. Now, I find that a heavy application of a good dish soap and cool water after I know I've touched the vine helps. The last four or five times I've gotten a rash, I saw the vine after I touched it and knew to watch out for an itch. After washing with ample dish soap, I usually only get a small spot here or there. A regimen of near-scolding hot water exposure, washing gently with soap, and generous application a mixture of neem seed and jojoba oils cuts the itch almost completely.

Poison Ivy grows thick in our woods, and I have also noticed that I see patches of wild grape without ivy or vice versa. It's possible that there's a specific condition that benefits one over the other or that one possesses a countermeasure it deploys against the other.
4 years ago