John Kirbde

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since Jan 20, 2015
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Recent posts by John Kirbde

Su Ba wrote:Lorinne, I don't think there is anything we could say that will change the way mainlanders are dealing with their crisis. Hawai'i has a unique culture which incorporates aspects of Old Hawaiian and oriental cultures. And here there is a lot of respect issues when it comes to ohama (family), Aunties, Uncles, and Tutus (the elderly who culturally are given respect). So although we of course have our rogue elements in our society, in general there is an obedient respect for authority........as long as it doesn't counter Hawaiian cultural tradition or values.

One thing that drove the State of Hawai'i to action was the fact that we have few hospital beds, few ICU units, and very few ventilators. There is no way the State could deal with a major outbreak without massive suffering and deaths at home. That, plus the call from the public to take serious action, forced officials to act. Our governor dragged his feet initially, but a major call for action by the public forced him to act. One thing that really impresses me here in Hawai'i is the the public has significant power to sway officials. Not on every issue that's for sure, but they really can often swing things in their favor.

Restrictions really suck. No doubt about it. On with most of the islands here, our communities are small. It didn't take long before communities themselves were impacted, and it really hurt to see a favorite town Auntie dying from this virus. It got personal. It wasn't just some faceless statistic that got the disease. So while people grumble a bit about the restrictions, we don't hear many loud complaints. When such complaints get aired, some respected elder within hearing range speaks up, shaming or berating the complainer. End of story.

Do we enjoy the peace and quiet? I haven't heard anyone here say that. In general the Hawaiian residents enjoy their tourists. They are friendly with them, help them out. Hawai'i is very much an Aloha state. And of course, much of the State relies upon the tourists to financially survive. While there are things that are annoying about tourists (they litter horribly, leave messes behind in their hotel rooms, and are awfully rude by Hawaiian standards), people here still welcome them to our islands.

The way Hawai'i is slowing this epidemic is via forced social distancing (including lockdown), sanitation, and facial covering. Only three of the islands have things under control. Two more are almost there. And two need help. As I stated before, we are hoping for an early release of a working vaccine.



I live in Kona, and I see two types of people here at the moment.  There is the first group which holds all the recommendations as serious and abide by them the best they can.  There is a second group that lives basically the same way they did three months ago.  Though businesses are only supposed to be open if they are essential, the definition is so broad that almost every business is still open.  You can wake up in the morning and go to Starbucks for your latte, head over to Home Depot or Lowes or Ace Hardware and browse the garden section or maybe shop for new kitchen cabinets, head to Target and see what new shoes might have come in recently, then stop at any restaurant in town for lunch.  After lunch you can head to Safeway and grocery shop (almost everything is back in stock now).  On the way home stop for gas and run by the bank to get some cash from the ATM.  Later in the afternoon you grab your surfboard and head out for an hour or two catching some waves and on the way home grab dinner at a local restaurant.  I know people that basically still live this way...a lot of them.  

Perhaps there is some sort of herd protection going on where those taking things seriously are protecting everyone else.  Maybe we have it better since it is warm here and homes have good mauka and makai breezes.  All I'm saying is that there is a huge mixed bag of what people are and are not doing in abiding by regulations, weeks after they were imposed.  Not sure what (if anything) the solution is to this.
6 months ago
I live in Hawaii on the Big Island.  We don't have almost any of these things here.  What can we do for substitutes?
1 year ago
pep
As a tropical location homesteader we have interesting issues.  On the one hand we have your typical tropical weather.  On the other hand we have a bit of a rain shadow being on the leeward side of an island.  Some really interesting concepts in here that need some adaptation in our area, but food for thought!
1 year ago
Shawn, is that number from experience or did you run some sort of comparison test? Very interested...
4 years ago
Like Shawn, I think paddocks have been the thing that we have worked on the most. The stacking functions of chickens in our paddock system allows us to rotate the chickens throughout the system without a tractor (not that using a tractor is bad). Of course, the benefits of bug control, manure scattering, etc are then moved throughout the system and the paddocks are not overused by the chickens as we move them every 5 days. We currently have 5 paddocks for a total for a total of 30 chickens. Our 5 day rotation means that we give plenty of rest inn the landscape between rotations. I imagine that increasing the numbers of chickens would mean either an increase in the amount of land being used as paddocks or the separation of the current land into more sections so that they don't become overused.
4 years ago
I know your zone is a bit different, but here in Hawaii we use Natal Plum. It grows well, has thorns, is drought tolerant, grows thick, and produces food. Love using hedges as barriers.
5 years ago
From my Lanai last week on the Big Island of Hawaii
5 years ago
art
Since it is hot and dry, why not look into something like an evapocycle? We run a similar operation where I am and one in Samoa as well. It is fed off a biogas reclamation system and the effluent just evaporates, never touching the ground.
5 years ago