Rachel Watersong

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since Jun 14, 2015
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Recent posts by Rachel Watersong

Rachel Watersong wrote:The only downside we've found is that as a pair of snuggly newlyweds, it's a bit harder to spoon on the bed because one of us is usually on a buckwheat-lump. But... I think it's worth it.



Just a quick update-- we realized the lump was actually because of the bed frame-- the buckwheat pods were falling in between the slats everywhere but along a ridge in the middle. Moved the mattress to the floor and it's now even better, snuggle-ability has increased 100%!
3 years ago
We just made a buckwheat hull mattress using the Open Your Eyes kit (this one: http://openyoureyesbedding.com/collections/frontpage/products/new-twist-modular-pod-size) and buckwheat hulls we got from a local company that sells them for pillows. Total cost of the project was $400, plus about 20 hours (including research). And... I LOVE it. It's very different from a spring mattress, feels hard when you sit on it or touch it. But when you get into bed and scootch your body down into the hulls, they form around you and are incredibly comfy. I've slept like a dead person 5 nights running now, and my back and neck feel better. The only downside we've found is that as a pair of snuggly newlyweds, it's a bit harder to spoon on the bed because one of us is usually on a buckwheat-lump. But... I think it's worth it. Especially knowing we're not sleeping on a bunch of carcinogenic chemicals or supporting the industry that produces them, and our mattress will never be in a landfill! Bonus: I added a couple handfuls of lavender to the buckwheat hulls, so now whenever I get in bed I'm smelling lavender.
3 years ago
Congrats on a neat setup, as a friend to bunnies for many years (mine are house pets) I dig the notion that they should have space to run around and be rabbits.

One factoid from the house rabbit world is that they are OBSESSED with biting through electrical wires... so use that info how you will when it comes to trying to wire-fence them!
3 years ago
OP, I have a strong opinion here formed from decades of living with pet rabbits. My pet bunnies are house pets, so I have the kind of relationship with them that most folks have with a dog or cat. BUT, they are not dogs and cats-- they do certainly have "rabbit-ness" that they express by running full-tilt through the house at 4 in the morning, nibbling on anything with a corner, playfully hopping away from me (we call this slow-hop game "chase the bunny"), pouncing on the cat, flopping dramatically in a patch of sunshine, carefully investigating any change in furniture arrangement. They love to be "bad" and do things that they are not supposed to do (I know that last is anthorpomorphization, but I haven't figured out what that behavior actually translates to in bunny terms. They clearly enjoy the playfulness of chewing something then dashing away from it when I enter the room). When they are happy, they jump in the air and do a "binky" like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZgsMCRxXnI

In short, I don't think rabbits can express their true nature in a cage. They love to run. They love to jump in the air. They LOVE to explore new places. The key is, they will only do these things if they are in an environment that feels safe. Rabbits who live in cages turn into dull lumps, just like some people who are stuck in the same room all day (see the earlier mention of nursing homes and prisons, and how humans will sometimes choose to remain in confinement).

It worries me that most permies are very concerned with the happiness of their chickens and pigs, but don't seem aware that keeping a rabbit in a cage is limiting in many of the same ways.

For more info about what rabbits are like when they live in houses, see: http://rabbit.org/
3 years ago
I've been trying a new strategy: I never use soap on my armpits when I shower. I use soap other places, but on the pits I just give it a little scrub with a washcloth to exfoliate. After a couple weeks, I've been noticing a serious decrease in funk. I learned this trick from a friend, who had the same result. My guess is by eliminating soap, I'm giving my pits a chance to balance out good vs. stinky bacteria.

With this method, days I forget to use anything on the pits, are generally fine. Days I need to be sure about not stinkin', I use a bit of baking soda.

-Rachel Watersong
3 years ago