Michael Love

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since Jun 29, 2015
Retired firefighter in Central Maryland. Like to learn and do new things. Current interest in use of native plants and permaculture for gardening and home landscaping.
Olney, Maryland
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Recent posts by Michael Love

Great job. It's always rewarding to see those first leaves form. Give those seedings a little time before you thin them, like a set or two of new first leaves. You are probably good going with that thinner layer of mulch until the plants start to get a little growth on them. Keep at it - its a garden.

This is a great thread with good suggestions. I was thinking about a post in the forum that mention the benefits of combining diverse habitat stone, wood or rock features; mixing annuals and perennials; flowers and vegetables and mulch to help bring predators to your garden and manage pests. Great idea. So it can also pull double duty by helping stabilize soil as well using a combination of these things in you hugelkulture mound. My first thought was what can you use to stabilize soil and add other benefits like attract pollinators, attract predators for petty prey, give stability as well as diversity? So I used a key word search that included, native plants, stabilizing bank and soils against erosion. Wow there's ;lots of reports and studies with loads of ideas for specific plant recommendations to hold the soil in place. You could mix in the plants or even plant in horizontal rows at certain levels to hold soil in place. My first thought was the various sedge family of grasses that can stand as individual plants in a row, hold the soil together with its roots and even help retain water and reduce runoff. Here is a list from just one report and I just picked the list that had the small low growing plants. There are reports that include native plants from all over. Okay so maybe this doesn't fit perfect in all cases but it is a starting point to consider when brainstorming. I think that since fully mature plants may get bigger then you want them in your hugelkulture mound so you separate and otherwise manage their mass and transplant the operations and dividing to other areas. Here is a list in a screen shot image I look forward to comments and discussion. NC Cooperative Extension Backyard Stream Repair Program. Cheers




5 months ago
Excellent comments Nicole. Thanks for all you volunteers do for moderation and admin of the forum and Dailyish.

Mike Love
Regarding the “dailyish”  select digest of forum threads. I really appreciate Permies and the dailyish digest of threads that may be of interest to forum members. It is a good idea to keep people interested as well as you offering some commentary as interest people in forum threads they may not have noticed. - an In Case You Missed It (ICYMI) movement . Here’s why I am writing.

I am an admin and moderator of several forums unrelated to permaculture and I am always looking for better ways to keep people engaged and mining gems (threads) that are relevant and interesting. Would you mind giving me a little review about how you go about your creation of a dailyish digest? As few comments that you can offer is fine, I’ll take what I can get and hopefully find a way to return the favor.

Again good job on the dailyish.

Thanks
Mike Love
Central Maryland U.S.
Tracy's a rock star. I am coming to this party 3 some years after posted but it came in my email feed. I use stone for many things around my garden and yard. I use stones dug up from the soil as draining in potting containers. I also have a fieldstone path from my patio to my composting area. Recently put down river stone over an area where I used to have shrubs just as a place holder next to the garage I may get some livestock water tanks and do some container gardening in these. Also have some nice 2' X 2' red filed stone pavers that I am thinking about where I may need a new path or mud free work area. I have photos that I attached as files but I need to figure out a new photo app for image sharing.

Mike Love



5 months ago

Ban Dinh wrote:Like Dan Boone, I frequent sales, with estate auctions being preferred. I usually buy "vintage" yard equipment that was manufactured years ago to different standards and is still good for many years. Maybe the previous owners also bought junk, but got rid of it when it failed so it doesn't show up at the estate auction.



It is a good approach Ban Dinh and I hope our fellow, followers of permaculture see Artie's tool failure as an opportunity to do just what you are doing and what for me has emerged as a practice for supplying my needs for everyday items. It is also an opportunity to start to learn new skills in making repairs, maintenance and restoration techniques for the old tools after all self reliance is certainly a core strength of permaculture. What I have to resist is the urge to save everything because then it becomes another social problem.

Mike Love
9 months ago

Artie Scott wrote:Update:  new blade was $15;  shipping was $16. I paid it, but not happy about it.



Yes it is irritating and even though you feel committed to not being wasteful they were just sucking you into a cycle of spending that is not cost effective. Wow, it sure is an unreasonable shipping cost and casting those stinking blades once the mold is made is probably just cents of that $15. Sorry about this debacle but glad you shared it to reinforce what is going on in industry. At some point it makes sense in permaculture to just recycle that steel tool and buy a better tool. I am surprised (not shocked) that the blade is cast - I have one hanging in the shed just like it as well as a pole saw and lopper that I bought and gave away a perfectly good old tool away on Freecycle. I have started buying and rescuing old tools and restoring them instead of buying new junk that has designed obsolescence. My rant is over. Happy New Year All.

Mike Love
9 months ago

David Ulrich wrote:Berming--before water settles in one area--as is a technique within...permaculture for getting water "caught" to where it's desired...being (e.g. watering some trees, etc.)  There's... drain pipe (in-ground), etc.?  Also...?  "Swamp"...plants:  wetland's varieties...desirable, actually?



David Ulrich has the right idea to use "rain garden" techniques with plants that thrive and tend to help manage the water in specifically designed areas. They most often use native plants. it helps to excavate a depression and help things along by adding gravel and other aggregate to help accumulated water soak in. High water runoff areas such as impermeable surfaces such as roofs and patios can have "rain gardens" statically placed immediately down stream from the drain off areas. Rain Garden Network here is an example of a link with info, one of many.

3 years ago

Jane Southall wrote:What is the best natural oil for waterproofing a deck, on a budget?  Thanks.



I am sure that you can also come up with different materials more available in some parts of the the world and not others. I am a member of the Raised Bed Garden Facebook Group and saw a nice garden set up with mostly poplar 2 X 10 lumber - but I noticed it had a cool amber/greenish tinted oil look to it. Asking the designer of the garden and he advised that where he lives in California that he can get all the avocado oil that he wants for next to nothing and he uses it for treating the wood on all his raised bed garden jobs he completes for people. Not unlike the response to your query someone mentioned the birch bark oil, but again it needed to be at least regionally local to be of cost benefit. I for one would like to see how your deck turns out.

3 years ago

Mike Feddersen wrote:Michael Love(is that your real name?)



Thanks Mike and that is my real name. Your links especially the video were very helpful. I'll give some feedback on results.

5 years ago