Erik Krieg

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since Nov 04, 2015
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Recent posts by Erik Krieg

ok thanks.

getting extra dirt isn't an issue, i primarily don't want to bother the roots of all the trees.
1 year ago
working on my design for my little cabin and i have a good area in the woods.  i dont want to cut any trees down if i can help it, was wondering if just excavating the topsoil off of the foundation area, building the stone foundation and then backfilling 24'' up the foundation wall would be sufficient.  see attached pic.  there are a number of old Appalachian log homes that seem to be just on stacked stones pretty much level with the mineral soil

code here requires 24'' of cover of any footing.  

thanks!
1 year ago
if you do go log home i am interested in trying the butt and pass method but with squared off logs.  as the previous poster said, the sap wood isnt nearly as rot resistant.  the butt and pass pinned with epoxy coated or galvanized rebar should last a really long time.

i would want a full overhang all the way around 24'' or even better a trussed out 36-48'' overhang or wrap around porch on any wooden structure around here.   my house is painted cypress and the sides that don't have overhangs get beaten by the weather and need to be repainted every couple of years.  my siding covered by the front porch roof looks brand new.

bugs are no joke either, termites around here will demolish any wood in contact with the ground, carpenter ants can get up inside the house, powderpost beetles will even eat dry lumber.  Although i think you can treat wood with a borax solution to keep these things at bay and it is not a terrible chemical for us but you need to keep the wood dry or the borax washes out.

just a couple observations.
1 year ago
no doubt some need to be touched up a bit.  i do have a hammerdrill and feathers/wedges that i have used to take off odd corners.  also a big sledgehammer and rockhammer.  my point was i dont want to spend the time to make all rectangular rocks.  both because i dont have the time and i like the irregular look.

my intent is to shape them as little as possible.  they are bluestone (granite or basalt?) and were blasted out of the ground originally or broken up with a hoeram so most are surprisingly squared and angular.

primarily I was wondering if the stones should be resting on stone or resting on mortar.  IE, if there is a slightly angular piece and i fill the gap with a smaller rock to "steady" the larger rock should there be an inch of mortar between them or should the rocks be touching and just use mortar as a gap filler.  or even i have have 2 flat rocks, do i put a thin layer of mortar, maybe 1/2'' between them just as space filler and wack the top to set them directly stone to stone?  it seems mortar provides little strength.

i plan on using the large stones pretty much as they are and making obscenely thick walls.  24'' stone thick walls are total overkill for anything short of a castle but it would be way easier.  The smaller stones can be used as facing on either side of the 24'' and infilled with the cuts/chips off the larger ones i think.

1 year ago
appreciate it but i think these rocks are better suited for conventional stone construction.  gabions tend to be smaller rocks that can be dropped in from above.  some of these rocks are likely 600-700lbs.  the majority are likely 2-300.  I can move them with my backhoe but i dont think gabions are what i am looking for

just some advice about how to lay "random pattern" stone with mortar.

thanks!
1 year ago
stone and log homes have been built in the Appalachians for centuries and there are still some standing.

keeping rain off of the structure is the most important thing i think, even though you don't traditionally see large overhangs on historical appalacian cabins it seems like there would be more left standing if they had used them.

noah bradley on youtube talks a lot about trad appalacian log cabins and gives out a fair amount of into gratis.

i worry about straw bale in any area that is high moisture/rain or humidity.  maybe unwarranted and I really dont know much about that type of constrution but i have seen how gross straw gets when its wet even for short periods of time.
1 year ago
I got about 200T of bluestone when they were building a highway locally, ranges from rip-rap size (6-9'') to 24''x24''.  

interested in building a stone "cabin" about 16x16 or so.  similar to the attached pic

i am not a mason nor do i aspire to be so i am not looking to shape the stone much at all.  Each piece has a decent face already I am just wondering about stacking the stone and the mortar.  

I was thinking a rubble trench foundation about 30'' deep and wide would be sufficient and then to stack the stones above grade with mortar filling the gaps.  Am I right to think the stone should be sitting on stone and not really "sitting" on a lot of mortar?  ie, the compressive strength of stone on stone is great but the compressive strength of stone on mortar is mortar... so only maybe 700PSI.  not that it matter much for such a small structure but i was just wondering best practices...

1 year ago
thanks all.  frost depth for footings here is 24'' but it really never freezes below 12''

i had thought about a rubble trench but there is no way to drain it as there is no downhill from where i want to build, its all pretty flat.  

i am going to be making a log cabin so the weight is not small but i think you are likely right about just filling in my piers holes with rubble and stacking a large rock or two on top is likely sufficient.
2 years ago
i was thinking of making a small 10x10 or so cabin.  was going to make it on stone pier foundation but in order to speed things up i am tempted to use forms and concrete as well as the stone i have.  some is quite large, think 2-4sqft each and very heavy, but some is football size or smaller.

If i build a 2x2 plywood form and just start dumping rocks in lifts and then slopping in concrete after each set of rocks.  then vibrating it to fill the voids is it going to be strong enough?  i dont really have the time to build a set of actual mortared stone columns.  finding and fitting each rock seems like a royal PIA for what i am doing

thanks!
2 years ago
i assume it would depend on the type of log cabin.  i dont see a lot of examples of rough roundwood log construction like i'm looking for.  there are plenty of log home plans (horizontal logs stacked on top eachother) although they're mostly for kits.  There's also timber frame plans i just dont know if the two types of construction are the same.  it seems like they would be close but there have got to be some differences since roundwood isnt perfect dimensional lumber.