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Patrik Schumann

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since Nov 06, 2015
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forest garden greening the desert trees
BA Computer Graphics & Scientific Imaging
pursued "design of Man's interaction with Nature"
Apprenticeship in Earth Building & Earthen Architecture
MA Environmental Design: Passive & Low-energy Architecture
Two decades inner-urban high desert radical sustainability/ subsistence horticulture: the 20% homestead
Last drops irrigation conservation & edible biodiversity tree cropping
Nuevo Mexico, Alta California, New York, Andalucia
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Recent posts by Patrik Schumann

Alright, I was actually asking the nature of your interest & therefore possible follow-up direction: the page structure/ limitations of my web site OR detailed content/ questions which might have been addressed on subsidiary pages.  Thanks, Patrik
9 months ago
Hola, Web site/ home page is a single "scroll" with no linked pages yet, images stopped working consistently a few months after porting to NM-mountains-based ISP from GoDaddy Web Builder.  Hope to get subsidiary/ related operations, projects, etc, up as linked sites or pages soon.  Got any knowledge of all that?  Any further info I can provide?  Best, Patrik
9 months ago
Hola!  Get in touch if you're still looking.  I'm long-time NM-based though ranging widely these days; projects from San Diego to Andalucia.  Back home for monsoon.  Web site (images unreliable depending on browser): ecOasys.net.  Also: LinkedIn.  Ciao, Patrik Schumann, ecOasys@hotmail.com, ecOasys, AlMunias, H2Omin, etc
10 months ago
Hola all,

I had good results with a semi-temporary/ semi-permanent (zoning & building regs!) hoop house/ sunspace (30' x 12' x 9') attached to the south side of my cement block house in Albuquerque.  It's designed to be able to reconfigure on short notice onto two 12'by10' 'accessory structure footprints', attached or detached, or completely removed (due to boundary setbacks), should a neighbour raise an objection or the city throw the book at me.  

I use recycled/ recyclable painter's plastic in frost season & shade fabric in hot season.  Both can be rolled up or/ and down and are clamped on.  I never got as far as strapping down the plastic, and perhaps for the best because we have one or two nights a year with 80 mph perfectly-aligned canyon winds that will the take the plastic whether or not anything else is attached.  I also use row cover under that.  With the thermal mass of the wall plus the extra buffer at plant level, I almost got a breeding crop of cool season Chilean aji through the winter, if only one of those windstorms hadn't also taken us to six below!  

Typical winter nights are in the teens, sometimes single digits, with most days well above freezing.  Often overheating is a problem, unless I open the house windows near each end and using fans get a circulation going.  In that case, I have to damp down the woodstove as the house quickly get to 70-80 with that wonderful musty-soil greenhouse smell.  

The only thing I'll change in the future is baseboards which won't rot or attract termites, a perpendicular/ axial tube to keep the ribs evenly spaced (not trivial to affix due to rubbing-on-plastic problem), and a quick-release/ -adjust criss-cross bungee-like long strap system.  

Best, Patrik
1 year ago
We've had great results with fava beans, growing them through mild moist sub-tropical winter in coastal southern California; then shelling, briefly steaming & blending, or directly stewing with everything you'd use to make a hearty chile stew.  

Hello Khalid & thanks all, Interesting & useful observations & leads.  

I traveled across Pakistan from Karachi via Islamabad, Peshawar, Khyber & Darra, Chitral back way to Gilgit up to and over Khunjerab in 1987, and have always wanted to go back to collect what I saw growing & ate around there.  It's taken me since then to assemble (in New Mexico) most of the (sweet pit) apricot varieties collected there by a USDA Plant Explorer the following year.  I haven't been able to get anything out of the close exchange that existed for a while between USDA & Afghan institutions, and I haven't started yet with India.  

Given the tightening of the international plant movement regime, the buy-up and shelving of so many independent seed & nursery collections, and budget constraints on government repository systems, don't underestimate the value of local collecting: old botanical gardens, defunct agricultural experiment stations, forgotten plantings of private collectors, abandoned subsistence homesteads.  

By all means keep collecting internationally.  I've never noticed much seed on the move in your requested types, but once you get past any possible commercial sources there are deeper distribution & trading networks too:

modest-cost membership organisations (note some public resource & supplier pages):

https://exchange.seedsavers.org/
- large member catalogue of material for trade

North American Fruit Explorers
http://www.nafex.org/links.php
- has fruit type interest groups & Pakistan consultant

Northern Nut Growers Association
http://www.nutgrowing.org/

California Rare Fruit Growers
https://crfg.org/
- active mostly through local chapters, some of which collect, document, distribute much better than others
- fruit facts, of which the older format version more helpful, on many additional types
- if you don't get much frost also try feijoa (pineapple guava), araza (Cattley guavas), pitanga (Surinam cherry), etc

I have modest footholds in southern New York, central New Mexico, and southern California, and have been watching for land around those places over three decades: unless one has much better funding than the land itself can produce, knows someone well outside of the marketplace, or is willing to go quite a way off the beaten track & out of the comfort zone, the odds are very poor indeed.  

Let me know directly if I can help further.  Best, Patrik
Hola, I've adapted a 'plum' tomato family heirloom originally from Sanandaj, western Iran, via a decade in London, England, to high desert in Albuquerque, central New Mexico.  It was a low-intensity though all-fronts multi-year effort, with successive direct-seeding & indoor starts transplants (last frost between Mar & May) plus tarps over late crop some earlier frost years (first frost Sep-Nov).  Some years they were an impenetrable viney thicket and/ or reached the roof, others they were small & almost self-upright.  However, I always selected the first ripe fruit and over 20 years eventually managed to bring a crop in just as monsoon was expected in early July.  As I shifted to relying on a larger crop for my starts operation & our kitchen, I also noticed more volunteers around and tended to those.  Though not quite the season-extension/ hothouse-tomato locals were bringing to market, they sure met our needs well across a long season.  Unfortunately, during those 20 years more and more monsoons started failing (higher salinity in metered water) and last decade night-time highs in summer stopped typically falling into high 60's often staying in high 70's for weeks.  A hot season dormancy set in which split my crop into early and late.  Having branched out elsewhere for a while I'm now facing a totally different climate again.  Best, Patrik
1 year ago
Hola everyone, This is what most all growers used to do as a matter of course.  I've been collecting, growing, saving, selecting, breeding seed & scion lines of vegetable & herbs (300+ vars) & fruit, nut, berry (600+ vars) for many years.  I've approached close to some others & organisations involved. and I'd very much like to see & be part of a systematic collaboration on this.  Note that scale, time, complexity, differentiation, communication, information become challenges quickly: amount of land, succession/ overlap/ time management, individual interests/ parallel cropping/ exchanging reproduction-propagation material, making the most of the group effect, making comparative phenological data accessible, zeroing in on the most promising while keeping the long-term wide-spread going.  My focus at the moment is not breeding the best true-seed garlic for high desert or finding land for the 17,000 apple seedlings from which one might not be a spitter - it's the app that'll connect us all, the material, and the insights.  Best, Patrik

see also: https://permies.com/t/70803/Apple-seed-amd-grape-collective#593924
Hola everyone, This is what most all growers used to do as a matter of course.  I've been collecting, growing, saving, selecting, breeding seed & scion lines of vegetable & herbs (300+ vars) & fruit, nut, berry (600+ vars) for many years.  I've approached close to some others & organisations involved. and I'd very much like to see & be part of a systematic collaboration on this.  Note that scale, time, complexity, differentiation, communication, information become challenges quickly: amount of land, succession/ overlap/ time management, individual interests/ parallel cropping/ exchanging reproduction-propagation material, making the most of the group effect, making comparative phenological data accessible, zeroing in on the most promising while keeping the long-term wide-spread going.  My focus at the moment is not breeding the best true-seed garlic for high desert or finding land for the 17,000 apple seedlings from which one might not be a spitter - it's the app that'll connect us all, the material, and the insights.  Best, Patrik

see also: https://permies.com/t/70905/Changing-world-direct-seeded-gardening
1 year ago
Having done drylands horticulture with last drops irrigation over three decades, between high desert New Mexico and coastal southern California plus a few places further afield, and being in a business startup process for rain-water 1st/ grey-water 2nd/ metered-water least irrigation conservation, my suggestions are:

- reduce your water needs to a quantifiable optimum
- swale all your rainwater runoff/ overflows directly across grow spaces & direct-to-soil
- large tanks are unnecessary with summer monsoon during growing season (NM), except when higher-quality water is needed out-of-season
- large tanks are very helpful with winter precipitation/ poor water quality (CA), but will cost you ~$0.50/ gallon capacity
- in most households grey-water will be a larger & cheaper source, requires more critical management for quality but can also reach level of fertigation
- prefer gravity-fed over pumped
- managing & integrating the three sources under highly variable weather, climate, & production situations can be complicated

At NM 1456sf R&D homestead using all 8" avg rainfall but no greywater I am deep-watering 1/10 ac of 20-yr edible plantscape/ orchard-gardens/ (nursery/ starts/ chickens) with 2400 gals once every 3 weeks = 16"/ yr, or half a traditional acequia irrigation right under 100" evaporation.  
At CA 1200 sf demo house under 1/3 evaporation I am putting in 4x365 gals under downspouts & 2x5000 gals for their overflow = 11,460 sized to hold one year's historical average roof runoff, though I'll also be overflowing both neighbours' runoff through system, for smaller plantscape/ gardens but poorer water quality & soil conditions.  Greywater system with 24-hr tank pumped up to hillside orchard tank for 14-zone bi-weekly rotation will produce twice the water, with my & son's bio-compatible soaps but wife's beauty products.  
1 year ago