christoph Berger

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since Nov 26, 2015
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Recent posts by christoph Berger

Thanks all you guys. I have researched recently as well and apparently both red and white oak work well. I am going to use oak because its easier to find nearby here even though there's none on my land. But they say red oak actually does work and they use it commonly in the Appalachian because it dries out very quickly according to what I read and although big oak logs can rot fast the shakes are so thin that they dry out better and actually do last pretty long. And white oak might be even better but they both work similarly. Also according to mother earth news you do split them off Green wood. I'm really interested in shakes because it seems like such a better material than asphalt.I'm not worried about fires cause it's not gonna catch unless your house is already on fire or you have chimney problems so just gonna be sure to do the chimney well. But also its so worth it environmentally, like I don't think we can afford to keep using the old building materials honestly much longer and furthermore because shakes last so much longer they are a better material not to mention so much nicer looking. But its also cool cause you can do a whole roof for free... for the time I would spend earning money to pay for new asphalt shingles every 15 years I would way rather be making shakes and probably spend less time on them anyway. Thanks also for the advice on how to do it you guys I'm excited to give it a try soon
2 years ago
I am planning on making shakes for my log cabin roof here in vermont and wondering what kind of trees would be suitable to use? I have white spruce on my land that I was considering.I just want them to last like 20 years at least with a 45 degree pitch. I also have sugar maples here black cherry, beach, and birch.that's about it so I was thinking the white spruce would be the best option. But if that is not a halfway decent wood for shakes I'm willing to go to the effort to find a better type of wood for it. Thanks

PS is it crucial to season the wood a whole lot before using it?
2 years ago
I like the idea of other draft animals but I'm really set on a horse just because of the riding aspect.since my property it totally forested it will be helpful to be able to get around there. And for work like pulling logs around when I build and Maple sap in the winter. I know a cow could do the draft work just as well but I like the riding aspect too mostly just for fun...but could come in handy too.
Anyways I might get a older horse like some of you were recommending, and I could maybe get a colt later when im more prepared to have horses. I think it would be fun to try to raise one sometime though. And I might get a couple goats or something to give it company but I am hoping i will be able to bring it over to neighbour horses frequently enough for it not to get too lonely.
I got a 10 acre woodland lot in vermont for 22,000 which I love. It's on a mountainside but gently sloping. sugar maples and southern exposure. Trees are perfect size for building and its on a dirt road. Cant hear highways and the air is so clean. If you buy something far out there it will cost less money because it has less value to the idea of mainstream society but the bonus is that you get something totally pristine and away from pollution. So best of both sides, as long as you don't mind being a way out there is a great way to go about looking for a property. You can find even less expensive land. I like to have little debt on my land so I need less money and can put more time into my own land.
2 years ago
Central vermont Stockbridge here. I love the the whole state. Green mountains are great seem to get good conditions. Mountains seem to rarely get overly dry but I only moved here from Nh seacoast. Vermont is so pristine thats why I love it and so many small farms all over. The old farmers are still going strong here and there's the whole new generation attracted to the state. Cows sheep goats dairy, vegetables And gmo labeling.
2 years ago
Thanks everyone. I'm going to take my time and be sure I have things figured out before rushing into anything and thanks for the advice and opinions. I'm going to cut probably an acre of trees this winter to get started, add cow manure and lime and seed pasture next spring so it will be reasonably established after a year or so. I feel that a lot of the supposed necessities of owning horses is just like the supposed necessities for human living conditions but Im happy living in the woods in a hut and bathing in a river and drinking from a spring. Going without electricity plumbing and whatnot. Anyway I don't wanna sound like I think I know everything especially since I have never owned a horse but I tend to think not all the cultural horse ways are completely necessary. Anyway I'm hearing all thats been said and appreciate it all so thanks again to everyone.
Hi I am living on a 10 acre piece of land in vermont as of one year and building a house from the lands resources and starting a farm. I love horses and I have loved horses since I was a kid when I did some riding.having a horse is basically a complete necessity for my lifestyle and inevitably something I am going to do and I am good with animals and respectful to them. Anyways, I would like to buy a horse as a colt and I'm wondering what the necessities are for doing that. How much of my forest land do I need to clear for it to graze on to supply it with the majority of its food as a colt. And then as it gets bigger too... I'm in the process of clearing the land and establishing meadows. And I will build stables. I'm not using saddles. Also I am going to bring it to neighbor horse feilds so it can socialize and I won't need to have a second horse. So basically wondering what the costs are to do this in a very low-key way as I do with most things I do. And what my land needs to contribute. Thanks for reading this and I appreciate your help
I think it would be hard to mix it onto the cob but maybe you can worth a try...I am probably planninf on just putting out on between two layers about 5 inches thick of wool.
2 years ago
cob
I would recommend sheep's wool thats what I'm using on my cob house in vermont. I got 700 lbs for $200.00 but I also got a bit more for free and I know you can get it all free if you contact a lot of sheep farms in the beginning of spring and fall when they shear. They have lots of scraps that they can't sell and its a great insulation material. They sell actual rolls of the stuff but you really don't need that and it'll be a lot more expensive. In any case 700 lb is enough for a small house
2 years ago
cob