Chip Douglas

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since Oct 31, 2016
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Recent posts by Chip Douglas

South pole magnetized water will increase the germination rate as will magnetizing the seeds. The effects are more pronounced in some crops, but apply to all of them. Effectively magnetizing large quantities of seeds would require seed magnetizers like the ones Davis and Rawls invented 40 years ago. As far as I know they aren't available now. A farmer who only has a small number of acres, on the other hand, can magnetize seeds for some plants that grow large like watermelons, tomatoes, etc., with magnets. Davis and Rawls used a biomagnetic tape for this. You can put hundreds of tomato seeds, for example, on just one foot of this tape. It's very cost effective.

Magnetizing water is very cost effective too. Magnets can be attached to irrigation hoses and they will magnetize the water as it passes through their magnetic field. The water will speed germination and increase growth in the crop. A simple experiment will show that.

Here is another pdf on humic substances. This one consists of chapter summaries of a book about humic substances titled, Humic, Fulvic and Microbial Balance: Organic Soil Conditioning. This quote is from page 27. "Fulvic  acids,  for  example,  have  an  influence  on  water  in  that  the  nuclei  of  atoms within  the  water  are  charged  or  magnetized;  thus,  minerals  and  compounds  are involved in a specific magnetic configuration, assisting in the informational message to the plant's DNA."
http://maxgreenproducts.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/HumicFulvicandMicrobialBalance-OrganicSoilConditioning.pdf
4 years ago
Here's a very interesting link about magnetizing seeds.
http://magnetage.com/Magnetizing_Seeds.html

If you look up magnetized water research on the web you'll find studies. Here are a couple I found.
http://scihub.org/ABJNA/PDF/2010/4/1-4-671-676.pdf
http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/AJEA_2/2014/Jan/Hameda442013AJEA7468_1.pdf
4 years ago
If the magnetite has a magnetic field that's strong enough and is very close to the seeds it can increase their growth, but how it affects the soil properties is another matter.

You can debate me on this topic, never try an experiment, and never know whether or not it works. You can also do what I've done. Do some experiments and see the results for yourself. Everyone elses dismissal of it becomes a little saddening after that. If growers would only try it they would find out that it really does work.
4 years ago
When the Earth's magnetic field was far stronger, that alone influenced plant growth, as it still does today but less so. If there were appreciable amounts of magnetite near germinating seeds it would affect them at a genetic level too, in addition to Earth's magnetic field. That's what magnetism does.

Yes, but we don't create the electric current any more than we create the magnetic field. As Nikola Tesla said, the energy is already here. We just tap into it and use it for our own purposes. You can compare it to solar panels in a way. We don't create the sunlight we use to generate power with the panels.
4 years ago
Well, the magnetic strength of the Earth fluctuates over time. It was much stronger thousands of years ago. So by using magnetism to increase plant growth we are mimicking nature. As some scientists have pointed out, when we make magnets we are not producing the magnetism in them. Magnetism is a natural energy and we don't have the ability to create or destroy it, only to harness it.

And of course humic substances are produced by microorganisms breaking down organic matter.
4 years ago
This is a controversial topic, but there is ample evidence from research that has been done showing that magnetism can be used to improve plant growth. Seeds can be magnetized and water can be magnetized and then used to water the plants. I've even read that fulvic acid, if I recall correctly, has magnetic properties. Anyway, here are some interesting links.

This is a video from Florida State University on research they're doing using magnetism on plants.
Magnetic Effect on Plants

Here's another video on using magnetized water for gardens.
Magnetized Water: North and South Pole Use In Gardening

These are good ones on humic substances. I think one of these mentions the magnetic properties of fulvic acid.
Organic Matter, Humus, Humate, Humic Acid, Fulvic Acid and Humin: Their Importance In Soil Fertility And Plant Health
Oxidized Lignites And Extracts From Oxidized Lignites In Agriculture
4 years ago