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Taylor Cleveland

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since Feb 07, 2017
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Recent posts by Taylor Cleveland

Artie Scott wrote:Do tell, Taylor!  I was hoping to learn how myself!



So it turns out we would need to rent an auger to wood posts, and steel my neighbor could drill in with his skid steer but we would then have to have them welded- which we don't have a welder. The fiberglass posts are more expensive but cheaper when your not hiring someone to weld.
We are lucky to only be an hr away from Greg Judy's farm. (if you have never heard of him, he is worth checking out. His youtube channel is great!)
He sells fiberglass corner posts that we plan to purchase.



He has also come up with a system of using a tree to help support a single corner post, which will be the big money saver for us. it took our post number down from 35 posts and 20 H braces to 24 posts and 9 H braces



Here is his website: http://greenpasturesfarm.net/fence-posts/

Im also debating back and forth between 1in fiberglass posts I can get locally and these timeless posts. They are what Greg uses and look pretty slick. Im just not sure if they are worth the extra cost.
https://timelessfencesystem.com/products/
I actually just found a more economical alternative to this and it’s actually fiberglass. I can get them locally and can drive them myself. Sorry to bother you all!!!
I feel like learning about fencing is equal to learning a new language. So excuse my ignorance as I explain.

We are putting in 5 strand high tensile perimeter fence. We are using fiberglass posts. I know a lot of you don't like electric but we have had a lot of success with it and are confident in our decision. My hangup is corner posts. We are in rocky Missouri bluffs. We also need 13 corners/gates. Im trying to find the best option.

Fiberglass is out of our price range for corners. I was thinking steel or wood. Our neighbor is going to come out with his skid steer and drill holes for us.

So here is my list of questions:

- Does wood or steel require a more shallow hole? We have had issues getting very deep in the past while drilling.
- With steel do we then have to weld rebar into a cross as opposed to a wood "H"? we don't have a welder so that probably answers our questions.
- If I'm starting the fence at a building (and not continuing it on the other side) Do i just need 2 posts and bragging as opposed to 3?

I attached a picture of what were fencing in. Each grey scribble is a gate. It is about 7 acres.

Any clarification or corner posts 101 would are appreciated. Thank you!
We’re setting up a hog panel “training” pen to train the pigs on electric fence. Then we will be moving them through the woods. I’m curious if you all think we need to put in actual corner posts or tposts will work. They won’t be in the pen for long periods of time. Just training, loading, and for any situation when we would need to maybe work on the electric fence/some sort of other maintenance. Our soil is extremely rocky and I really don’t want to have to pay my neighbor to bring his skid steer in to put in holes for the posts.

Since it’s a wooded area I was thinking we could use some trees to attach to it for duribility with a combo or tposts instead

Thanks!
1 month ago

Hugo Morvan wrote:Raspberries do sucker like crazy, it's great! I try to keep them out of my veggie patch, just let them grow wherever they pop up until autumn, then dig them all up and start a new patch out of the way. Works, if you don't mind a bit of a messy garden, or have a lot of land.
My raspberries are pink and give in spring and autumn in wet years. The first spot i covered was shaded, they gave loads and i got lots of suckers, which i moved to a sunny spot. Which don't do so well there in hot dry years, but because i got the two different areas i've always had fruit every year now. In wet years, the ones in the sunny spot did great in wetter years, the ones in shady bits did better in hot dry years. And in general, they like to be many, they need space it seems, which they can occupy. They die as easily as they pop up by the way.
When heavy with fruit they bend down, i think they will go over your pathway or you need to bang in two poles on both ends and connect a string/cord in between. If they touch the ground, you get snails on them more often.
Blackberries need more permanent support. I've seen people growing them along fences, just wind them through. When they bend over and touch the ground they will root there, especially if you put a rock on them. The next year it starts growing strong agin, until it touches the ground again and roots there. You can get it to go all along a fence like that. They're not very strong immediately when they touched the ground and rooted, don't move them before giving the root system a year to establish.
Same for the Japanese wineberry, let them grow along a fence and they will go down and grow roots, let them be for a year before moving or just let them attached to the motherfence. That's why a fence is so great for these kinds of plants, they're not in the way there and can fill the whole thing so you don't see it as much.



I had intended on doing 2 posts and wire to hold them in. I do have plenty of cattle panels that I could also use instead of wire. To simulate a fence?
2 months ago
I love this community! Such great advice! I’m going to change my plan and put raspberries in rows 1&4. Blackberries in 2&3.
2 months ago
I was wondering if you all could give me some advice. I have 12 blackberry plants(potted, 2 varieties an 6 of each variety), 3 red raspberries  (bare root), and 3 hello raspberries(bare root). They are all primocane and thornless. They just came in the mail today from a stark Bro’s!

I was planning on planting the blackberries on row 1 and 2 & all six of the raspberries on row 3.
The section with 4,5,and 6 is where we plan to expand to next year. We intended on doing all three rows in blueberries.


I am questioning if I should change this plan to:
1. Blackberry
2. Blackberry
3. Yellow raspberry
4. Build up a row tomorrow and plant the 3 red raspberries
5&6. Leave for blueberries next year.

I’m considering this because I feel like it may be more wise to have each single variety in their own row(instead of combining the red and yellow raspberry)
I have also been told that raspberries spread fast(like blackberries) and so it would be good to have a larger space for each variety.

What are your thoughts?

Thanks!!!

2 months ago

John F Dean wrote:I don't use sale barns.  But, why not talk with other farmers? An eye roll is not going to harm you, and you may get some valuable information.
I have 11 acres. My neighbor has .....well let's say he gets over 5 mil a year from farm substitutes in this county alone.  I still get valuable information from him.  He has a good grasp on what I am about.   I would hate to lose him as a resource.


I have great relationships with our neighbors. They have taught us sooo much. They just have no/very little compassion for animals so the very idea of what I am asking is unthinkable for them. His sons dog got hit by a car (beloved dog) she he just walked in and said “go shoot your dog Cole, it just got hit by a car”.
I know a lot of you will roll your eyes at this and that’s okay. I am a livestock farmer who struggles with the ethics of it all. I have come to accept raising animals with compassion and allowing them to have “one bad day” where they are then harvested to feed us. Anyway, as we expand we have the opportunity to sell lamb to a wholesaler who has their meat processed at a local and very humane processing facility. But they pay the same or less then a sale barn (selling finished lambs). I don’t know the exact process of sale barns but I imagine it’s 1. Sold at salebarn 2. Shipped to processing 3. Harvested at processing. Is this exceptionally stressful/fearful for the livestock? More then us delivering them to a local processing facility? I don’t have to guts to talk with our farmer neighbors about this because I know there justgoig to look at me like an idiot.
I guess I’m trying to figure out which one is a more dignified way to go, and if they are similar than sale barn it is. But it that is not the case it is worth it to me to make less money and providing them a more peaceful death.
Thank you both! Very helpful. I’m going to go for it!
2 months ago