Michael Littlejohn

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since Sep 26, 2009
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Recent posts by Michael Littlejohn

Thanks JD I did not know about SC and raw milk sales, thats a useful tidbit. I am not thinking of selling produce or animals or meat, thanks to the regulatory bodies in the USA which, correct me if Im wrong are no friend to the small farmer....anyway such meat and produce would just be for home use. Id look at anything that I think is a bargain, and only 2-3 acres would be necessary...thanks..ML
5 years ago
Thanks John you are knowledgable--I have a furniture business among other interests, all animals and agriculture would be just for home use. Price range? "Not ridiculous" and "not overpriced" compaired to local land prices--"budget" is another way to put it. I only need 2 to 3 acres....I'll check out HUD sites next. thanks...ML
5 years ago
Hi to all,

After a couple of false starts buying land that I thought was a bargain but turned out to be totally unsuitable, I am again looking for a few acres to call my own, for my own home and biodynamic project--anywhere East of the Mississippi and South of the Mason Dixon. Prices can not be astronomical..any thoughts? Thanks much...ML
5 years ago
Hi to all,

Mike here, living about 1/2 hour East of Huntsville, TX---working on a biodynamic farm in East Texas, my next month's project is turkeys---at any rate, I am single, left the big city about 8 months ago, and find myself in a place where it would be easy to be socially isolated---I was born in FL, raised in VA and spent alot of my adult live in NYC and Chicago---Im not even hotly hunting a boyfriend, just looking for some community (in suppliment) to my straight friends---it could be nice to know some GLBT people out my way...even a monthly movie and meal kind of thing? It would be a bonus if you were farm folk or working in sustainable ag/energy/housing etc....Let me know if this is of interest...be well..Mike
5 years ago
Hi to all,

I have two properties, one 10 acres in Reeves County and the other in Presidio, Texas, I have listed for sale on various sites, and I have been promoting ion various forums. Id like to liquidate them, as I am now interessted more in East Texas...any advice on how/where and a strategy to sell them? thanks much..Mike Littlejohn
5 years ago
Hi John,

Thought I would respond a little to your post--you certainly do want to inspect any potential property and make sure that somebody knows where it is and how to get there, you may discover all sorts of interesting things about "cheap" land such as (1) no GPS coordinates, (2) no road (3) easement required to legally access the property (4) unusual potentially problematic structures on the perimeter 94) evidence that the property is regularly used as the local biker/teen hangout, etc. Yes in this day of Google Earth and satellite intel, you could with GPS coordinates get a fair look at any potential property paying particular attention to the location of the color green, and as to whether there are seasonal what are called arroyos in the SW (rivers fed by Winter snow melt) on the property....I'm afraid there is no substitute for boots on the ground in the inspection of property, but if you can work out the above issues in advance, you have at least a good chance of actually standing on the property itself. Apologies if any of this advice is redundant to other postings..Mike
Hi, Mike here I'm 54 GWM who has lived primarily on the East Coast, FL, NY, NJ, PA and TX but have decided to make the high dry country of Central Utah (Emery County) home. I have been unparternered for many years but have some nice friends locally. Renting and farming a half acre at present but hoping with friends to buy at least 5 acres by the end of the year, we are all very much into earthships, hobbit houses, bio and eco domes and somewhat entrepenuer-oriented as well. My interests are of course self sufficiency, small animal care, music (former professional singer of classic jazz) and now turning my energies to setting up a luthier's shop so I can start producing jazz guitars and violins next year. As mentioned I am seeking friends to expand our little community but somebody special, a romatic involvement would be gravy...thanks for looking.......Mike
5 years ago
Hi to all. Financial Strategies----I bought land when I felt that I couldnt afford it, but bit the bullet and now Im glad I did. The axiom "The longest journey begins with a single step" I think applies pretty well. I actually bought three properties (all in SW Texas) before I felt sufficiently clarified to understand what my needs were and learned something important in each transaction. To date I have a 22 acre and two 5 acre properties for sale, and would likely sell exactly for what I paid for them and not cry that I didnt make a profit on them. Im content that money went into building equity and did not get frittered away on something else. But my main point is that its good to start small, stay flexible, actually practice buying a small piece of land somewhere, because it teaches you so much. For instance I have a beautiful property which is only 6 miles from a small town, but the surrounding mountains make it feel like the ends of the earth. Not a soda can or telephone pole in sight. A unique microclimate where rainwater runs down onto the property so that the mesquite trees have more water than generally the surrounding properties, yet I was unable to attract anybody down there so there was little I could do in terms of building community. I am in Utah now, and have worked my process somewhat backwards (think I got it right this time.) I now have a smallish community of alternative/ag people and we are looking for a property in joint, to reduce the cash outlay of any single party. I have realized that its easier to build the community as a first step than attract people to your ongoing project-in-progress, as people come with so many "must haves and preconceptions" , and I think we all worry about having a little control and do not desire to be absorbed by somebody else's vision...My friends and I have worked out all the compromises and find that we are pretty close to each other's vision, enough to make it work. We are even cohabitating on a rented property and are developing businesses on the side while we look for a property to buy. This tells you alot about your ability to work with and stand close quarters with one another. And, though it has been difficult evolution, I have gone from a totally "me" concept of land ownership to being okay with a jointly owned property. Small groups have greater buying power-certainly more than a single person..but this is common sense...Just my two cents for the day. Mike L.
5 years ago
Abe I like it! Nice engineering and generous of you also to post construction pics of it. But I mispoke earlier or just didnt change the idea of "ponds". My own project is only half dug at this time, but it will ultimately will be well below ground (where prying eyes will not be able to see it). It will be part of the house, and will do double duty as a Tilapia pond, and organic-hydroponics above assisting filtration....I think of as the heart of the house.

I agree in this part of the world, evaporation from the high temps would defeat the purpose of an open pond, ( but Im sure would attract all manner of desert life) water catchment in this part of the world should have a lid on it to conserve evaporated water. I am also hoping that the water, well below ground will absorb the ambient temperature from the cooler earth and keep the house overall cooler. I am also wondering if it is possible to run some sort of air vent through it to cool the house with a primitive sort of air conditioning.

Can I ask (other than that Pursilane) what you are having success growing out there??? Thanks... Mike
6 years ago
I think that a pond is especially necessary in an arid climate as your"water bank" in the event of hard times. In fact even in my part of the world, the Chihuhuan Desert, there is rain. 100 years ago it averaged slightly higher than 12 inches per year, lately its more like 6 inches with our current droughty situation. Desert rains around the world typically come not as they do in the NE USA, a bit here and a bit there with March being the wettest, but late Summer, and as a mini monsoon. You may get 75 percent of your rain in one evening and you must be ready to catch it. I have heard the nightmarish "cant catch rainwater" regs from other parts of the country (chiefly legistlature that benefits the cattle industry) but Texas has no such restrictions. Come on down.....PS I hope to start a Tilapia pond this Fall, fed on algae and freshwater shrimp. Mike L.
6 years ago