Mac Kugler

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since Apr 26, 2018
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books forest garden purity
I've moved from the city to the suburbs and I am so excited about planting and growing my own food. I am reading everything I can get my hands on. I particularly love fruit and want to grow as many types as possible. I'm very happy living out my passion and I have found my plant family here at Permies.
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Recent posts by Mac Kugler

I watched this movie on Netflix last night (within the US). The implications of the movie are pretty horrifying, and it's clear there will not be any disclosures from companies as to what "toxic gick" they're putting in fragrances; either consumers have to pay for private lab tests or there has to be overwhelming pressure towards political people to get this fixed.

I think the most shocking part was the information about how babies are born pre-polluted.

I certainly will regard fragrances with heightened awareness.

Thank you Paul & Jocelyn for reviewing this movie. I don't think it would have come to my attention otherwise.
I have long wavy/curly hair on the top of my head, and keep the sides + back short. Been poo-less for the past six months. My hair looks and feel great, and doesn't smell like anything. No issues with hair knots any more. Took about two months for my hair to normalize after going poo-less. I basically massage my hair and scalp under the hot shower to get sweat, dirt, extra oil, etc, off, and that's it. My hair keeps some of its natural oils afterwards. Showering every 2 days is a good cadence for me, I'm fairly active, and poo-less I spend a lot less time showering. A shower for me takes about 5 minutes, and have no guilt taking a maintenance shower (post-workout, going out, etc).

My spouse had absolutely no idea until I told her about two months ago; she thought the practice was "gross." I occasionally work in a little scented oil for aromatic effect so she thinks I'm back on the 'poo wagon. After much pleading on my spouse's part I did fully shampoo my hair with a natural shampoo last week; my hair was so dry and fragile afterwards, looked terrible, and it kept getting stuck in my hair brush. Took a few days to get back to normal. I have some knots and frayed ends as a result.
1 month ago
What kinds of trees are you going to be planting? How big of an area?

I find that dug-up sod creates lots of weeds. So I try to minimize doing that as much as possible. I also have found that grass holds moisture in the soil; originally I thought "grass is bad near my fruits/vegetables!" but I've since changed my mind, and now include growing grass in my water strategy. Grass is part of Fukuoka's "natural irrigation" strategy. I think it might help keep your nursery hydrated, trimming where appropriate.

I am not sure what to do with the comfrey and green compost. I would start a compost pile, I guess; I would not want to kill off the grass by smothering it, or feed weeds that got released from the digging. Maybe you can use it in another part of your land? Add it to existing compost, or do a "Ruth Stout" style composting? (deep 2-ft bed of material, bury the compost in it).

Richard Kastanie wrote:Sam Thayer has written a good deal about black nightshade at this page. It is used extensively as a food plant in many places of the world, reported poisonings can be traced back to misidentification, usually with belladonna (which is the plant the deserves the name "deadly nightshade", but they are pretty easily distinguished from each other.



Thank you for sharing this excellent and well-written resource. I think his reporting style is great and I like the anecdotes. This resource confirms my decision to keep the plant in the yard.

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
Last time I ate several hundred very ripe, raw, berries of black nightshade, Solanum nigrum,  I suffered severe gastrointestinal distress.



I am really sorry to hear that. :( I am sure the ones in my yard aren't that variety. Even so, I'll start with just a few.
5 months ago
Hi everyone

I am pretty sure I have black nightshade in my yard (the solanus americanum variety). I am reading that the berries of this variety of plant are toxic until fully ripe. I am interested in having a variety of fruits in my yard, so that would be one reason to not interfere with nature doing her thing here. From a wider perspective, what could be this plant's role in permaculture (aside from adding more "poly" to "polyculture"), and more specifically, in my yard (where I am gardening) over the long term? My guesses:

- provide fruit for wildlife
- support aphid/ant symbiosis (the ones in my yard like to accumulate black aphids)
- ?

I am not crazy about the aphid population booming, but could that encourage ladybugs to move in? (haven't seen any here in the past few months).

I am also wondering if any of you have information on whether or not this plant accumulates anything which would make it useful in rapidly developing soil health. I've also read this plant has solanine in it, and if solanine is a plant's natural insect defense/ has insecticidal properties -- could composting this plant help develop soil (and therefore plants) which are more pest-resistant?

I have just been on the forums a few months and also just got started with learning about permaculture, so please pardon if I missed something obvious which would have helped me connect the dots.
5 months ago

J Anders wrote:osage orange



Thank you! I'm laughing at my ignorance. I've lived in cities all my life, this is my first year in a more suburban environment. I really appreciate your help.
6 months ago
Hello all,

I hope you might be able to help me identify what I'm seeing in this photo (attached, and at this link https://imgur.com/a/oqFFERH. I am not sure of the identity of the tree. Is this green sci-fi-looking-thing the fruit? I plucked up the courage to poke it with a stick, but it didn't move (hard to the touch), so it seems to be part of the tree.

For reference, I am in Maryland, northwest of Washington DC, in Frederick.

This is my first post so I apologize if I have put this question in the wrong place in the forum.
6 months ago