Dolly Bigelow

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since Jul 24, 2018
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Recent posts by Dolly Bigelow

This year I planted 8 different varieties of tomatoes. 4 out of the 8 have been affected by early blight. The first to be affected (and separated by a house and two outbuildings from the rest of the garden and other affected tomatoes) is a variety known as "Galina". "Galina" is growing beside "Black Plum" which has a known resistance to early blight, and "Gardener's Sweetheart" which was introduced by Will Bonsall. For my own seed saving purposes I'm going to assume that it is at least somewhat resistant. Out of the 5 Galina plants, 1 has not had any signs of early blight!!! I want to select this variety for disease resistance, and so I would assume I would naturally collect seed from this resistant plant, and then in subsequent years save seed from many of the disease resistant offspring to reduce inbreeding. (Correct me if I'm wrong or share your experience!)

But for my remaining varieties affected by early blight: Mortgage Lifter, Cup of Moldova, and Kalinka... all have shown at least some sign of the disease. How should I select for disease resistance? Should I select plants that hold up the best? Should I instead select for something else like early production and yield?

What would you do in this situation?

Thanks for your replies James and Dan!

I was nervous to add it to my compost as I'm not 100% sure it gets hot enough to kill weeds or diseases. My carbon ratio is on the low side so I've always treated my compost with caution. I really should get one of those handy thermometers to put my mind at ease. I was thinking I could locate the material out of range, but spores travel in mysterious ways so it's better safe than sorry. I may try composting it in a separate composting system and make sure to use it on only a non-tomato non-potato crop next year.
6 months ago
Okay so I have some tomato plants that are showing some signs of early blight. I have trimmed all lower stems off and I was aiming to burn them once they have dried a bit (but in the meantime, they are relatively close to my potatoes...) but I'm wondering if they could be put to better use as mulch?

I have two blueberry bushes (new this year) in my front yard area, with a house and several outbuildings separating them from the tomatoes and my regular annual vegetable garden.

Do you think I could use these prunings to mulch said blueberry plants?
6 months ago