Amy Maria

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since Sep 09, 2018
Southern NH, zone 5a(ish)
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Recent posts by Amy Maria

Yarrow and plantain come to mind - maybe with a little clover mixed in for some nitrogen fixing. Lightly mulching the seed with grass clippings or even hay will retain moisture to help germination.
5 months ago
I learned that I definitely need more garden beds.  
I learned that at this age, I need to pace myself.
I learned that I really, really like growing things that have minimal storage requirements like potatoes and winter squash.
I learned that there is such a thing as true potato seed, and I'm looking forward to trying it out.
I learned that I am always learning. Always.
I'm enjoying the new flower forum, and seeing some of these older posts I never happened across before!

An edible-flower rite of spring I miss now that my kids are grown is dandelion fritters.  Yes, the dandelion flowers are edible!  The posse of neighborhood kids would gather a huge bowl, and I would dip them in a thin pancake-type batter, fry them, and then sprinkle them with powdered sugar.  They would then march the tray around to each house in the neighborhood and give samples, because it was very important to them that everyone discover that you could eat dandelions!  

LOL, I hadn't thought of this in years.  Maybe next year I'll harvest a big batch of dandelion flowers and attempt wine instead.
1 year ago
I like white clover as a cover crop, especially as a lawn replacement.  It's low growing and attractive, fixes nitrogen, and can serve as a living mulch if you want to plant something right into it.  :)
1 year ago
I don't know the other ingredients of BlueKote, but Gentian violet is something we use in the hospital for neonates, including premies, for thrush (I'm a NICU nurse).  I think if it's safe enough to paint inside a premature baby's mouth, it's probably pretty safe for wounds. ;)
1 year ago
I love elderberries!  I also use the dried ones for tea to combat respiratory illnesses in the winter, and am planning on growing plenty of my own.  The Black Lace are beautiful plants - mine are tiny ones purchased this year, and I'm looking forward to seeing them grow.  I also have a volunteer plant from a few cultivars my husband accidentally cleared a few years ago (thought they were weeds).  They are ridiculously easy to grow from both hardwood and softwood cuttings, either in soil or in water.  I had never tried the water rooting thing before, but it worked beautifully.  So, once your two plants are established, you will have lots of plant material to propagate as many as you want!  Good luck. :)
1 year ago
Thank you, Kyle!  That's the one. :)
2 years ago
This reminds me of the concept of "winter sowing" popular among folks growing more ornamental things, but certainly applies to lots of useful permaculture plants. I haven't done it in years, but was planning to do a big batch this winter. Not sure if links are allowed (I'm fairly new!), but if you search "winter sowing", you'll come up with Trudi Davidoff's (sp?) website, which lists lots and lots of seed types that are successful this way.  They tend to use labeled containers set out to overwinter in order to keep track of what germinates, but you could certainly do mixed sowings in dedicated areas.  
I used to start a lot of my perennials, herbs, and some veggies this way - and yes, I found that those plants, especially the tomatoes, were much hardier throughout the growing season.  I kind of love the container method, because I can sow new (recycled) containers in the winter "downtime" of January and February; it makes the wait for spring seem a little faster.  Happy planting!
2 years ago
I'm in NH, not Ontario... but I found several sellers on Amazon, since I didn't know anyone growing them locally.  Once you have them established, you'll have them for life!
2 years ago