Orin Raichart

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since Nov 25, 2018
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Recent posts by Orin Raichart

a bandsaw chainsaw attachment off to the machinist...needs to marry up to my battery operated chainsaw.
A thousand winters in one. One of masks, half masks and the unmasked. Where did the bed go when I layed down? Did I dream it? Somewhere between the flannel sheets and a soft quilt of the softest layer of feathers?

And to what reality have I awakened? Can anyone tell me? What exactly has transpired? Is it like 2020? Is it like 2021?

From the answers snarled and shouted glee, I am even less certain that I am awake, for these answers reflect not a trace of the place I remember when I was lulled into winter's to hibernation.

Perhaps another bout of slumber will wash over me and I will surface safe, warm and radiant in the bed I cannot find.

My feet find the ground and my left shoulder aches like a Mack truck has introduced itself less gently than I wished. What has occurred? Has winter really gone? Is this mid-May?

My eyes focus, sunlight through spring hail greets me and I find myself at First Light on Narrow Pond.

Cool air enters my lungs, tools come to my hands, and the strange dream that surrounded me fades to stranger eddies which threaten at any moment to erupt, to engulf my consciousness and the planet I inhabit.

No need I tell myself, to feed nor justify these strange eddies. There is hunger in my belly which needs attending more, shelter I need for refuge, and water for waking thirst.

So I exert the tools to the material while I continue the design On Narrow Pond. I hope all can find the soil upon which to stand, to breathe unburnt air, and watch the sun caress soil's seeds into green.
A thousand winters in one. One of masks, half masks and the unmasked. Where did the bed go when I layed down? Did I dream it? Somewhere between the flannel sheets and a soft quilt of the softest layer of feathers?

And to what reality have I awakened? Can anyone tell me? What exactly has transpired? Is it like 2020? Is it like 2021?

From the answers snarled and shouted glee, I am even less certain that I am awake, for these answers reflect not a trace of the place I remember when I was lulled into winter's to hibernation.

Perhaps another bout of slumber will wash over me and I will surface safe, warm and radiant in the bed I cannot find.

My feet find the ground and my left shoulder aches like a Mack truck has introduced itself less gently than I wished. What has occurred? Has winter really gone? Is this mid-May?

My eyes focus, sunlight through spring hail greets me and I find myself at First Light on Narrow Pond.

Cool air enters my lungs, tools come to my hands, and the strange dream that surrounded me fades to stranger eddies which threaten at any moment to erupt, to engulf my consciousness and the planet I inhabit.

No need I tell myself, to feed nor justify these strange eddies. There is hunger in my belly which needs attending more, shelter I need for refuge, and water for waking thirst.

So I exert the tools to the material while I continue the design On Narrow Pond. I hope all can find the soil upon which to stand, to breathe unburnt air, and watch the sun caress soil's seeds into green.
1 week ago

paul wheaton wrote:
What else should i budget for?



-organic material or atleast no spray material

-organic manures



the soil is so poor, chop and drop will not produce much in the first year.

to quickly get enough viable and productive soil, organic materials and manures need to be, at minimum, sourced and at best, stock piled for use.

failure to plan for this logistic will result in upset and discouraged gardeners who are used to copious availability of soil builders.

to just say 'oh, that'll be up to each gardener to source' will result in considerable friction

then, how each gardener chooses to use this material (compost, compost tea, vermiculture and all other methods) will distinguish the different techniques rather than how ferocious each gardener can compete for local organic material and manures.

as a measure of just how much material is needed; three large round bales of old hay per half acre is a good start.

manures, such as chicken and cow manures, for one year per half acre, would be three pickup beds full ( a pickup bed like Ranger Doug's in which a full 4'x8' sheet of wood can lay flat in the bed with the tailgate shut  -not some half bed wanna be city truck).

5 months ago

Talyn Crafts wrote:
EDIT : Oh and if anyone wants the .STL file to play with , just let me know and I'll figure out a way to send it to you to play with ! ☺️ It should work in Sketchup and FreeCAD and any other program that opens .STL files.



I would like a copy....I need practice of playing with other's files too  (importing, viewing, and maybe editing).

twobirdstone at gmail
5 months ago

Talyn Crafts wrote:Oh woah! Wow!

....

Talyn Crafts wrote:
Creating 3D models, even for those super experienced - still takes an investment of time, whereas pen and paper will always be faster.
The pen and paper and measurements (or reference photos with measurements) are necessary as a first step for FreeCAD, in terms of modifying pre-existing structures.



I thought this way until I needed to put plumbing, ducting, wiring, and lighting in a building. Suddenly my drawings became more and more detailed until I'd have to change scales  to a larger and larger paper size.

I still didn't think it mattered much until I found that being a 1/2" off during building meant that I could no longer put the pipe where it ABSOLUTELY must go.

If you've ever gone to a construction site where the office has the onsite's General Contractor office, you'll see stacks of blue prints all for the same building.
 Why so many drawings?
To catch all the details with out mistakes so every system fit together instead off occupying the same space (no, in general two objects of complexity will not work if they both suddenly occupy the same space...I think it's called an explosion).

But what really changed my mind was when I had to add a new energy system into the existing cool systems I had carefully arranged.  Uh-oh. Remember all those blue prints in the contractor's office. Yep. Gotta redraw almost every single one of those stacks of drawings if you don't want to run into problems during construction.

What a 3D <parametric> modeler does for you is astounding for the above issues I've just pointed out to your paper (and used to be my) drawings.  Want to see what happens to the whole system if you substitute 2x6's for 2x10's   How about 2x8's? You so discover you can't add 1" boards to your floor unless you tear out your rocket stove's barrel because it now interferes with you hot water stack and ceiling clearance  -not to mention any cold air outputs or low placed outlets of dc electricity.  oh, and wait that extra height makes your kitchen counter be above your kitchen window's sill -ooops.

A 3D parametric modeler make these issues obvious and makes changes to your designs soooooo much easier  -as in a week of drawing.


Talyn Crafts wrote:
Often 3D models (outside of just art / animation) have a particular utility to manufacture parts - but I don't think the goals / ethos of WL is aimed at 3D printing or CNC machines.

Potential Use Cases :
1. Designing completely new structures , like in terms of Ant Village or Deep Roots people. (Which makes sense why you and Grey are invested in this program.) ( Could be done with pen and paper.)

2. Designing potential structures, and asking for engineering or systems advice from other Permies more experienced in particular areas. ( Could be done with pen and paper.)

3. Using current working builds / systems , transferring into FreeCAD and offering those completed and tested designs into build-plans online ( for sale ? profits to WL and/or designer/builder ? )

4. Using someone else's 2D blueprints to transfer into FreeCAD, for the original 2D designer. (For people who are good at designing but not good at FreeCAD - but want to utilize a 3D model.)



1-  see my examples above.
2- asking good questions of the software first make it much easier to ask a pro  ....and to remind the pro of how his/her suggestions effect the other systems the pro isn't focused  on  -yeah, that happens alot.  The rocket stove engineer doesn't remember you've got a water pipe in a crucial area and that's why you choose not to adopt a certain embellishment of the rocket stove originally. Then you can say to the pro, I thought of that but I rejected it because of xyz...and the pro will say, oh.  or the pro will say, you're right but if you do efg, then you can get both the embllishment and xyz. If you don't remind the pro or can't because you don't know that xyz eliminates the embellishment because you don't have 3D sw which points out errors in minute details,  you might just nod your head to the pro and say, that's a good idea....all the while not knowing a gotcha is waiting for you in your own design and the new thing you excepted from the pro just eliminated another system you really needed.

so there's that.

3 and 4 both go to communications of your idea to others rather than solely about design being transferred into reality without any hidden gotchas or redesigns when you need to add a new system in.  Or design issues with substitute materials (oh yeah, you'll need to do substitutes some time or the other).

Yep, 3D Parametric modelers all have a steep learning curve ProE, N8 or any serious software from which you can gain both time and avoid mistakes require you sink a great deal of time in learning your modeler.  Then you can do things like thermal modeling with your shelter with a few modifications to your design  -can you do that on paper?  dunno, maybe

I love paper -make my prototype idea come to life with the feel of art.... I think on a white board/chalk board...
...but i do the final design on a 3D parametric modeler.

I can't make you love it.... but all it takes is trying to move the water lines only to find your air duct is in the way or wires, or .75" of your window, or now your door will never ever really close to open your eyes to the ease of design and needed design changes once you've learned a 3D Parametric Modeler

Try it on paper. Design a 12x12x12 shelter for me.
-It must have its longest wall (if you decide to move from the square) oriented solar south
-It must have a kitchen sink.
-It must have a rocket stove with at least 6 feet of bench mass
-It must have a cook stove (walker or lorenz wood style I don't care...biogas really isn't going to make it off of one person's food scraps)
-It must have a through the wall solar oven
-It must have hot water by both the sun and from your wood burning devices
-It must have simple lighting from a simple solar active system.
-the solar system's controller, inverter, and battery must be inside the structure
-It must have a very small shower (for space sake).
-It must have a hot box for cooking food brought up to boiling
-It must have a cold box for keeping food cool (usually passes through the floor into the earth's coolth).
-It must have a a large sleeping loft meaning two people can fit in it easliy
-It must have a solar air heater with the cold input right at floor height and a hot output 3' off the floor
-It must catch its water off the roof, pass the water through the wall at a minimum of 8' height to a 6" dia pipe running the length of atleast one wall and must hold 140 gallons. It must feed your water purifier and your shower.
-the overflow of the wall cistern must go into a outside cistern in such away it doesn't freeze.
-a foot pump to fill the wall cistern from the outside cistern in a manner it won't freeze.
-It must purify the water before it goes to the kitchen sink and hot water heater (the shower water doesn't need purification)
-It must have a grey water system which won't freeze in the winter
-It must have a desk and a work bench (I want the desk to face the window if I can get it)
-It must have a 12" dia cool air input for the summer not more than two feet off the floor in height on the north wall
-It must have a hot air exit of atleast 1296 square inches of area at the highest location on your south facing wall
-It must have one door
-It must have one window you can climb out of located some where away from the one door or a second door.
-It must have a kitchen window over the kitchen sink.
-It must have a kitchen counter atleast 42" long and not less than 26" wide.
-It must have a place for your clothes to be stored
-It must have a place for your food stores and your dishes
-It must have a place to strip off your muddy clothes and kick off your shoes

I want drawings that show me each wall, the floor, the roof, the inside ceiling
-there will need to be a drawing of the frame before the wall filler
-a drawing of your floor before you cover up the grey water exit pipes
-a drawing of how you are going to cover the roof and the exterior walls
-a drawing of how your interior walls, ceiling, and floor is going to be covered and finished.

Tell me when you start (as in date and time) and then
post it here or email it to me, twobirdstone at gmail
when you've finished.

I'm serious. Then I'll show you mine

BTW:  I like that you did a version for Bartell's Bunk House  -awesome!  not many people provided full 3D....and no one told you about where the berms on the walls are and are not.  

5 months ago

Talyn Crafts wrote:Oooh neat!

I've been playing around with SketchUp - frustrated by lack of tree view and property editor.

I just downloaded FreeCAD, and started reading through the intro documentation for getting started in it.

I have minimal (6 months worth) experience using MAYA , mainly for simple to moderately complex 3D models built to scale and very simple animation experience.


glad you have modeling skills to bring to the table to be sharpened!
Sketchup is easy but it isn't a parametric modeler in 3D or 2D.
FreeCAD has a serious learning curve -Grey is the best resource onsite at Wheaton Labs currently.

Talyn Crafts wrote:
I find design super fun, but I still don't have knowledge of weight loads. I understand that triangles / arches (or a combination of them) are considered the strongest, and perhaps that is why diagonals are so often used in timber framing ?

Any resources for basic learning in that regard ? I'm always curious to know how engineers think!


I am going to tell you a dirty little secret Mike H. will confirm: engineers use tables and memorized rules of thumb when it comes to loads

Since it is you that is asking, here's an answer you might find a little more interesting:
-physicist teach free body diagrams (and engineers have to take this course);
-during this course, you learn about moments of inertia around points;
-you also learn about how to identify the center of gravity not just for a single body (like a log or board), but also for multiple bodies attached to each other varies ways (tension, compression, friction).

The cool part is your body is a great measuring device of center of gravity and moments of inertia ....and you can start to intuitively feel what is going on in a design by looking at the drawing.

How to develop this art then?
-pick up an 8 foot long 2x4 and perfectly balance it on your shoulder  that balance point is its center of gravity.
-while it is balanced on your shoulder, notice how much effort it takes and the pressure on your shoulder.
-now put that 2x4 on the ground and stand at one end of the 2x4.
-at that one end of the 2x4, reach down and pick up the 2x4 on the last two hand widths of the 2x4.
-now try and hold that 2x4 parallel  with the ground with the 8' side horizontal rather than vertical.

notice how much pressure your two hands are exterting in the attempt to pick up the 2x4, notice how much efffort you are expending.

In the first case where you have it balanced on your shoulder at its center of gravity, you have a sum total of zero moments of inertia around its center of gravity.

In the second case, your two hands at the very end of the 8' span is trying to over come the moment of inertia the 2x4 exerts around the point of where you and the 2x4 are joined. This moment of inertia is very large and very noticable.

if these forces you are feeling in both cases are strong enough to break your 2x4 or log, your load is too great.

If your moments of inertia are not zero, your total structure will rotate in that direction and hit the ground.

Center of gravity can be tricky in a non-uniform body ( a 2x4 is  uniform). Ever pick up a rock that always wants to roll out of your hands no matter how you hold it?  That is because its center of gravity is a point outside of the rock itself!

...anyways, if you actually try this and play a little bit with it, then free body diagrams will suddenly make sense intuitively and the math will simply prove what you body will feel from the diagram.

this is the difference between an engineer and a physicist: the engineer doesn't have to think because s/he uses standard uniform materials for which tables and rules of thumb work great;  physicist works with no such assumptions and therefore must find answers for reality which may not be so uniform (I gave you a method some physicist use but then translate into math for engineers).

so in natural building, you can spend a lot of time trying to make your materials as uniform as possible or you can learn a little free body diagram analysis and train your own body's intuition.

if you come to the Lab as planned and are interested, I'll hold a free body diagram class.

Talyn Crafts wrote:
Should we create a thread to show off 'homework' or set up basic assignments to showcase skills learned ?


sure!  I like the basic assignment idea....are you seeing this as a single huge  thread for each person to post their completed task or multiple threads, as in each person posts one long thread for all their completed assignments?
7 months ago
As some of you know, Warren Douglas Bellant passed on September 25th, 2021 at 1:30pm.

He was a generous supporter of Paul's permaculture efforts and a generous supporter of my permaculture efforts via Yawling Rock.

Warren felt strongly enough about permaculture for the ecologocal impact on our planet and as a way to personal freedom that he was willing to over look other people's political views and orientations.

He felt that ensuring our planet's biogical survival is the greatest prep a prepper could do. He was glad permies worked with preppers and he looked forward to other groups, such as MGTOW, adopting permaculture also.

So while Warren and I disagreed strongly on other philosophies, we both believe that permaculturist, no matter how purple or brown, must be willing to set aside serious political or religious disagreements to focus on the biological survival of our planet.

How else will all the human inhabitants of Earth whose cultures, religions, and politicians have all humans literally at war with each other, be able to unite to stop the systematic destruction of life on Earth?

Permaculture, at it's heart, addresses human and all other life systems survival.

Permaculture methods rely on alert, aware troubleshooting which lends itself to decentralized networks rather than dogmatic centralized thinking.

Some people attempt to replace their current dogma with another rigid dogma which they believe is permaculture.

One cannot be dogmatic in their care of dynamic, interdependent, living systems and be successful for very long.

Cause and effect become layered bands of probability statistics the more complex and full of life a system becomes. Such reality cannot be fully captured by any unthinking dogma.

In the celebration of a mechanical hacker's life, I invite all here to be inclusive of those whom you might not otherwise work with when a human being comes looking for good permaculture practices.

Goodbye Warren, I'll miss your technical troubleshooting aplomb and your cheerfulness in the face of physical pain.
7 months ago

Talyn Crafts wrote:
.... and I'm excited to lend my first hour towards your build on a weekend in May of next year.

As of now, I'm on the waiting list - and hope to secure a spot in April (or sooner!) as a Boot.  (:



niiiiiiice! see you then
8 months ago
his videos are the ones I used to do round wood correctly