Andy Lopez

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since Jun 30, 2019
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Recent posts by Andy Lopez

Skandi Rogers wrote:Keep all non herbivore poo separate with plenty of carbon to help it, but the other pile (kitchen waste, weeds, clipping etc etc) can contain anything, fresh weeds are absolutely fine. if you think they may contain seeds then you need to get the pile hot but if they are young weeds it really doesn't matter.



That's the best suggestion so far. When I lived in Puerto Rico, my grandparents did just that. They had a outhouse which they cleaned regular (trust me I know)and they would have a separate pile at first. Then I got the idea of why not make a big pit and instaed of having to clean out the outhouse, just make the pit like a big septic tank (bricks or rocks cemented together with no drainage). it was full of some type of worms. I remember throwing compost into it once in a while. I thought that it would help in the decomposing process. Never had to do anything else. The out house was moved on top. Since the whole thing was buried, grass grew on top of the cement roof". I would visit every year or so and the whole area was really wild growing. I am not sure if the composted poo was trasnferring nutrients or if the "worms" were but I believe it was the mycelium that transferred the nutrients to every one else!  The other piles were normal with everything from animals hair, feathers, plants, kitchen waste you name it. We even had a big lawnmower type of grinder! The animal manure did not include our dogs or cats. I dont remeber having any other type of carnivorous animals.
1 year ago
Helianthus annuus, a dicot, is an annual herb that is native to California, is also found elsewhere in North America and beyond.
yes a wild sunflower variety!
1 year ago
they will fill in and become symbiotic to one another.
They will not compete with each other. Each will communicate with the other.
Allow the networks to expand. You will know when they are connected as you will see the growth and health increase. In nature, they will cooperate with each other over vase areas and forests.
I would not prune the roots re your second question. You are on the right track.
Let me know I this helps. I am happy to be of service. It is wonderful to see folks understand this and begin to take more care of or soil.
1 year ago
Hi
You dont mention much about what you are feeding it. Perhaps I missed it, sorry if I did.
The plants look like they might have a fungus. perhaps wilt. I also notice trace mineral deficiency on the leaves. These plants like the soil to be acid. around 6 ph is good for them. The ph level is important in nutrient absorption. Have you tried to apply a soil amendment made from leaves like oak leaves?  You might want to start a cover crop around it which will help retain water and collect nutrients.
Try foliar spraying with something like Sea90, which has 90 trace minerals. You can make your own trace minerals from around your property. Im happy to go over. You should also spray 1 cup milk in 100 gal water. The milk will provide calcium and bacteria. Both will help.
Also do you know what Brix is? Get a refractometer and test the leaves. If you have fruit, test the fruit. A healthy Kiwi should have 18+ Brix

Hope this helps


1 year ago
Hi
I have learned from experience that you should compost your fruit trees every year around the same time of year. So my fruit trees get compost in the mid-fall. They get compost in the early-spring. I gave up on applying compost early-summer as it is getting way too hot and the compost will bake and destroy my little armies. Not sure where you live at but if it snows it kina determine your composting times. When I lived in Boulder Co, I would compost before the snow came. I found that it works quite well. I would also then compost in the spring when it got warm enough. I would make my piles before the snow and cover it and allow to sit during the winter time. However, here in Malibu, the city is still working on rules for making compost. They don't like piles of any kind. I have started to make compost specifically to be applied directly to the soil and in turn, start various cover crops to enrich and allow the soil to be alive. I love all the great information this site has and hope to be able to add to it. Also, what matters to me about the compost is how it is made, what goes into it. It is important to provide an environment where living organisms have access to a wide range of trace minerals. They will, in turn, make sure the plants get what they need when they need it.
Love to all

andy Lopez aka Invisible Gardener
1 year ago
Hi
I am new here but not new to the soil. I have read everything here from the start of the thread and love it all. I have been saying same for millions of years it seems like. I would love to be available to help others and to expand this talk on the soil. It is very important now more then ever to understand the important role the soil has in keeping us all healthy. I do a radio show (actaully several), called Dont Panic Its Organic. I actaully own the trade mark for this, since 1970. I would love to have you on my show as a guest. Also my latest book is called  (you guessed it) Dont Panic Its Organic and would love to send you a printed copy. I give away the pdf version and will try to attach.
Thanks
andy Lopez
aka Invisible Gardener
1 year ago