Brian Kerkvliet

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since Feb 24, 2010
Bellingham
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Recent posts by Brian Kerkvliet

I don't even know where to start with on this. The guy likes to make crazy videos... with bad information content which is in my opinion worse then no content. Because people may get the wrong idea and think this is how it is done.
1- American scythes can not be peened to sharpen, you must use a grind stone. they have different steel and will crack if peened
2 - Never use a ball peen hammer it will distort the blade
3 - Always take the blade off of the snath
4 - Never listen to someone who starts out by saying "this is the first time I have used one"
5 - I can pull a piece of paper through my dullest blade and cut it, it proves nothing

That is just for starters
4 months ago

Brian Kerkvliet wrote:We will be doing a 2 day event following the NW permaculture convergence happening during the skill share faire. We are just starting to formulate exactly what kind of event but most likely it will be something simple like a farm tour, meal and social with advanced water and nutrient harvesting explanations and maybe some guild planting hands on or some such thing.

Stay tuned for more on this as things develop! NorthWest Permaculture Convergance



Here is what we are offering as a addition to the SkillShare Faire and NWPC convergence
Announcing an opportunity not to be missed at Inspiration Farm
In conjunction with the Whatcom Sill Share Faire and the NorthWest Permaculture Convergence, Inspiration Farm would like to announce a two day bonus event. Plan to stay a little longer and take it all in!

Monday August 25th
Treat yourself to an extended Inspiration Farm tour tailored to Permaculture veterans and newcomers alike. Witness the advanced earthworks that allow nutrient and water to be passively harvested supporting the whole farm. Walk amongst the food forest and experience the secessional evolution.
Check out the animal rotational systems in place and see the progress that working animals within the landscape can achieve.
Share in the evening pot luck, social event. Bring a dish, your instruments, and Tel-A-Vision around the fire.
All day is available for a suggested $10 donation (no one will be excluded for lack of funds)
Camping is available for those wanting to attend Tuesdays workshops.

Tuesday Aug 26th Preregistration Required $50 each workshop or $125 for the whole day event. Choose from three of the nine subjects
Inspiration Farm will host a series of mini workshops. Schedule subject to change
AM session you can choose from 10-12-am
-Reading the landscape, surveying and earthworks - Brian Kerkvliet
-Processing and cooking with Beans and Grains - Krista Rome
-Bio-char creation, inoculation, and use - Larry Williams
Lunch 12-1pm
Pm sessions you can choose from:
1st session 1-3-pm
-Establishing a food forest nursery - Brian Kerkvliet
-Crafting with wild medicinals from your landscape. - Suki Aufhauser
-WATER: gray water, storage water, and water in the landscape. - Bruce Horowitz
2nd session 3-5-pm
-Micro remediation, Establishing your fungal friends in the landscape -
-An Introduction to PatternDynamics™ - David MacLeod
-SOIL: Soul! Working with natural systems to build soil, composts and compost teas - Brian Kerkvliet

To register call 360-398-7061
6 years ago
Well.... after a good effort put in by all we have decided to postpone the PDC offering here at Inspiration Farm. As of the 15th we had a grand total of 3 people signed up, with a minimum of 18 to make it fly. Not wanting to keep the other guest presenters on hold for any longer then necessary we decided to postpone the course and try again next year with more planing and better promotion during the lead up.

We will be doing a 2 day event following the NW permaculture convergence happening during the skill share faire. We are just starting to formulate exactly what kind of event but most likely it will be something simple like a farm tour, meal and social with advanced water and nutrient harvesting explanations and maybe some guild planting hands on or some such thing.

Stay tuned for more on this as things develop! NorthWest Permaculture Convergance
6 years ago
Also here is the video that Paul did of me a few years ago. It gives you the basic information on peening scythe blades. One of the most important aspects of sharpening a blade, the most often overlooked and misunderstood.
6 years ago
Here is a recent video that Peak Moment TV put together on scything and other tools we use to get things done here at Inspiration Farm. Hope you can attend the PDC to learn details on these tools and techniques plus a lot more!
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgX544Q3ULg#t=24[/youtube]
6 years ago
Here is a recent video that Peak Moment TV put together on my scything and other tools we use to get things done here at Inspiration Farm.
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SgX544Q3ULg#t=24[/youtube]
6 years ago
Here is a peek into some of the systems designed to harvest water and nutrients and distribute evenly around Inspiration Farm. Come join us for a in depth look at these and other systems


6 years ago
I have not personally dealt with a lot of scotch broom but here is what I know. It is a nitrogen fixer and is there trying to repair and prepare the soil. Usually it dies back once over story trees come into play. It is what is called a pioneer species. You are hoping it will pioneer a pasture though. Have you checked the soil in that area to see what it is like? It usually grows in rocky sandy compacted or bad soil then it tries to make it better for the next secession of plants.

Pigs are usually pretty good at telling if something is toxic or not. If they don't think that it looks like food they will just leave it alone if there is something better offered. If it is a thick stand I would think that you would want to send in goats first to clear it out of leaves a bit first. Then send in the pigs and see what they do. You may need to help them out by cutting out the over story brush so that they can get to the root mass. Then encourage them to root by sprinkling grain where you want them to work. For the first several months they wont root a lot but they get into it more as they size up. All pigs are not created equal, we have had some pigs that were not interested in rooting much at all and others of the same breed totally were. 3 or more work better then two makes them a bit competitive. If you are going to get pigs anyway give it a shot. Sounds like a project. Good luck with that and let us know how it goes.
6 years ago
Get prepared for resilient abundance! Announcing the opportunity to get your Permaculture Design Certificate at Inspiration Farm, one of Washington's premier established permaculture sites.

Featured instructors Include: Brian Kerkvliet, Co-steward of Inspiration Farm and P.R.I. Certified Permaculture Designer, Sarah Sullivan, co-founder of Hawaii SEED, David MacLeod from Transition Whatcom. With special guest presenters, Doug Bullock, Washington’s Premier Permaculture Designer and teacher, Larry Dobson, from Northern Light R & D, Alex Winstead from Cascadia Mushrooms, and many more nationally recognized and local experts.

Enrollment includes a camping space and prepared wholesome organic farm meals.
Courses held at an established 12 ac. Permaculture / Biodynamic farm setting!

Course Dates: August 17th-29th
Additional Hands-On opportunities throughout the course and other after hours events

Space is limited- first 10 early students, $1295 regular full tuition $1395 Work-trade & Payment Plans available.
More information can be found at http://www.inspirationfarm.com/
6 years ago
OK how do I jump in here. There are many things that can be said in order to really address the solution to this task.

Problem: Heat water for a bunch of dirty permi folk all year long without enough harvestable nitrogen throughout the year.

1- In order to heat enough hot water for 4 shower stalls you will need 4 well built compost heaters but you will get 4 good piles of compost and you could stager them so that as one is cooling down the other is heating up.
2- In my humble opinion it looks like your compost pile is really lacking in nitrogen. What you need is a lot more manure and lush freshly scythed green material, grass, nettles, comfy etc. The pile you built may heat up but it won't sustain the heat very long without the food for the microbes. Fungus likes carbon, bacteria likes nitrogen and minerals. Look at carbon to nitrogen ratios: sawdust 500-1, straw 130-1, cow manure 18-1, fresh lawn clippings 12-1 you are shooting for 30-1 or higher for a compost pile to heat water for long period of time. Building a good compost pile is truly an art form it takes years to perfect for this kind of desired results. If you want to just make compost for the sake of compost it is not as hard. As they say "COMPOST HAPPENS". More on composts and carbon to Nitrogen ratios can be found here, http://www.oregonbd.org/Class/Mod4.htm and here, http://www.oregonbd.org/Class/CtoN.htm
3- The water coil must be long (at least 150' for poly) and conduct heat (better then pex). For best results it must be evenly distributed throughout the pile ( see photos for my method). Heat rises if you stack the tube on top of its self as in a vertical coil you will only be able to harvest the heat from one vertical area within the pile. If the tube is evenly distributed willy nilly throughout the pile you disperse your collection points evenly through the horizontal and vertical space within the pile
4- The pile needs to be much larger like 5'-6' wide by 10'-12' long by 5'-6' tall for one shower stall. Also the water pipe that runs through the pile must be at least 1' from the outside of the pile. lots of straw insulation covering the whole pile from the top all the way down the sides to the bottom.
5- If the pile is built right... and the coil is properly installed... and the pile is big enough one should be able to expect 2-3 months of hot water, hotter at first tapering off towards the end. However if there is an excessive demand there is the potential to kill the pile by freezing the horny little microbes that are franticly procreating to create the heat. So a regulated use should be observed for the longest run of the pile. Read- low flow shower heads and staggered use. Don't overly chill your microorganisms!
6- It strikes me that compost piles are not the best solution in your climate and situation for a year round bath house in Montana. Not enough green material not enough manure, not enough permi power to build and harvest and rebuild the compost. What about a rocket hot water heater? You have lots of wood all year round! Build it once and stoke it up for all four shower stalls any time of year! In the summer when you have an abundance of green biomass and manure then build a compost hot water heater for diversity and education to run one shower stall. What about this as a solution?

7- You need to ask yourselves what are your goals for using compost to heat water? Is it for the compost? Is it for the novelty? Do you have too much biomass? Do you want to use this as an avenue to do experiments? Or do you want to clean up the stinky permis? All of the answers to these questions will lead you to the right approaches to take.

Hope this helps.

I would be happy to answer specific questions about what I have learned after doing 5 Summers of showers here with my compost heated [youtube][/youtube]shower system.
P.S. I'm not sure how this is going to post as I am still getting used to this site
7 years ago