Tammy Farraway

+ Follow
since Aug 10, 2020
East Tennessee, zone 7A-ish
Apples and Likes
Apples
Total received
9
In last 30 days
1
Total given
0
Likes
Total received
42
Received in last 30 days
2
Total given
32
Given in last 30 days
2
Forums and Threads
Scavenger Hunt
expand First Scavenger Hunt

Recent posts by Tammy Farraway

Jamin Grey wrote:

Tammy Farraway wrote:They're about 7 years old [...]
The lemon has been giving us about a lemon a year for 4 years. This year we've just harvested one, and the tree has 3 others in various stages. The lime tree has set some tiny little fruit, but never kept them past that stage.



Do you bring them outside during summer?


I want to get some citrus, but not if I'm only going to get a dozen fruit a year.



We do not put them out in the summer - mostly because of the potential of bringing pests into my kitchen. The trees live at our kitchen table, which sits next to the windows that get the best sunlight.

We have a porch that wraps around 3 sides of the house as well as limited windows, so it is what it is. Eventually, the trees are either going into a greenhouse or a sun room at the front of the new house. In the meantime, I get some experience caring for citrus, and the novelty factor of a few home-grown lemons.

Also, like I said, they were tourist souvenirs, so likely weren't the best quality. I'm actually rather astounded that 2 of the 3 trees we bought survived. The one that died was pretty much DOA; it never leafed out.
1 month ago

bruce Fine wrote:I don't know where you are but here in East Tennessee there are quite a few good nurseries in McMinnville , warren county nursery is one that seems to have huge selection, turner and sons, freedom tree farms has wholesale bulk quantities, rusty magnum nursery
theres a bunch of places just have to weed through them for price and availability according to what you're after.
I think with rapidly changing climate its best to have wide variety of things going.



About 3 1/2 hours farther east, lol. McMinnville would be an all day trip for us - 2 days if we were going to spend very much time looking at anything.

We've been trying to look farther and farther from where we are but have limited time to look. We've also run into several places that have a web presence but are no longer in business.
1 month ago
I'm with Jay Angler on this one. I like the insides of a pie; the crust, well, not so much. My favorite pumpkin 'pie' has no crust at all. It's the pumpkin pie filling baked in a casserole dish - we call it pumpkin custard.

My husband does like pie crust, however.

Try replacing the water with something that has flavor (apple cider, lemon juice, broth (reduce salt), dark beer, white wine).
1 month ago
Prior to getting these citrus, I watered my houseplants like you suggest. The lemon and lime didn't respond well, so I changed how I watered them. They live indoors year round in the same spot, so pretty stable environment. YMMV.
1 month ago
I've heard of Oikos Tree Crops, but haven't used them. I've also looked into my state agriculture department tree seedling sales, but it requires a minimum of 25 of each type ordered. The only one I might be interested in that many would be elderberry, and they're out.

I would also be interested in any answers you get to this question. We're not having a lot of luck finding local nurseries, other than big box type places.
1 month ago
When our indoor lemon and lime trees started losing a lot of leaves, the research I found said possible causes were BOTH too little water or too much water, which was extremely frustrating to say the least!

I started measuring how much water I give them, and also instituted 'water Wednesdays' - a specific day to water. As long as the watering is pretty regular, the trees don't drop a lot of leaves.

They're about 7 years old and were little 6 inch in cardboard tubes tourist souvenirs when we got them.

The lemon has been giving us about a lemon a year for 4 years. This year we've just harvested one, and the tree has 3 others in various stages. The lime tree has set some tiny little fruit, but never kept them past that stage.

I don't think they get as much sunlight as they really need, but until we have a greenhouse, it's the best we can do.
1 month ago
I don't know about Meyer lemons specifically.

When our indoor lemon and lime trees started losing a lot of leaves, the research I found said possible causes were BOTH too little water or too much water, which was extremely frustrating to say the least!

I started measuring how much water I give them, and also instituted 'water Wednesdays' - a specific day to water. As long as the watering is pretty regular, the trees don't drop a lot of leaves. I don't think they get as much sunlight as they really need, but until we have a greenhouse, it's the best we can do.

They're about 7 years old. The lemon has been giving us about a lemon a year for 4 years. This year we've just harvested one, and the tree has 3 others in various stages. The lime tree has set some tiny little fruit, but never kept them past that stage.

Best of luck!
1 month ago
We have a multi-generational household. My mother, my husband, myself & our teenage son live in 1 house on about 90 acres.

Mom took over a lot of the cooking and dishes when she moved in. I handle the garden, chickens, dogs, and keeping track of my son's online schooling. My husband builds and fixes.

Greatest joy is being able to spend more than just a few days at a time with my mom. Greatest struggle? Probably just accepting that everyone has their own way of doing things. I still occasionally find myself re-organizing the spice drawer or whatever, lol.

#1 tip- Talk. Don't assume everyone is on the same page. And try to give everybody some space/privacy, particularly if you're living in one house.

I don't know what you mean by, "need to know how to legally get around that". As far as the pragmatic side, you may want any agreements spelled out legally.
1 month ago
For me, the most necessary homesteading skill to be successful is being willing to _try something_.

You might not be successful the first time, or the fifth time for that matter, but you can paralyze yourself looking for the ONE BEST way. I'm not saying you have to jump blindly, but do a reasonable amount of research/learning and then do something; take a step; make a start. Then look at what you did. Did it turn out the way you wanted? Great! Take another step. Didn't turn out? Okay. What could you change/do differently next time? Try that. Wash; rinse; repeat.
1 month ago
That's a great idea, Carla!

I have a pair short overalls in the donate pile (too short so I never wear them). I think I'll try making them longer.
1 month ago