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pumpkin/squash

 
Paula Edwards
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I think what we call pumpkin you call winter squash.
There's quite some confusion.
Carol Deppe has written a whole chapter on this vegetable, but she mainly bakes
the pumkin, which costs a lot of gas.
In our house we make pumkin soups.
Which are the best soup pumkins?
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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ediblecities, you're in Oz aren't you? It would be great to have your location up there.
Generally for me, well-grown fruit's more important than the variety. But...
Golden Hubbard's awesome. Be prepared though, they're huge  and hugely productive. Last year I had ginormous warty orange things growing everywhere. Looked  like some kind of alien invasion
Waltham's butternut's always good, as are old Aussies Queensland blue and Jarrahdale.
Marina di chioggia's a great pumpkin.
Keeping's really important to me and all these will last for up to a year if well looked after.
 
Paula Edwards
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We should have a similar climate, here we are in cool climate in the Upper Mountains. We have frosts and about 120 days of growing season, but I think, depite some foggy days we have plenty of sun, it's about two hours from Sydney inlands. So far I mainly bought and subsequently harvested (not planted) Jap which is good. The grey pumpkin with the hard shell, I think it's QLD blue I didn't like it so much in soup.
I think I plant a lot of pumpkins this year and therefore will not be able to save any seeds. And then next year after trialling saving the seeds.
Yes keeping quality is important.
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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For the ones not keeping well, cut them up and throw to the hogs and chooks.  They make a wonderful treat for winter fodder.
 
Leila Rich
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I try to plant a moschata, pepo (generally a zucchini) and a maxima every year. They can grow together without crossing. There's other species, but they're the only one's I've tried.
For eg, I could plant  Jap (maxima), butternut (moschata) and costada romanesco (pepo) together and get pure seed.
I recommend trying Hubbard, but only if you've got plenty of space. The vines took over my entire little place and between  trying not to stand on them, running over them with the wheelbarrow and tripping over giant pumpkins, I think I need a less...vigorous...plant. Tasty though!
 
Paula Edwards
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That is actually a very good idea!
I love pumpkin soup, but my family doesn't love it anymore.
I have a bit space to spare where I want simply to build some hills and let the pumpkin sprawl.
 
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