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Permaculture Design Advice?

 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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So I just bought a new place and I would love to get your input and let me know what I am missing so I can fix it before I plant it all this spring.

I have a small back pasture to play with it is flat and only 90' wide by 200' long in a 6A zone and I am tilling the whole lot and seeding also I want to plant two apple, peach and plum tree's and 300' of blackberries along my fence line with a pasive drip system. I will be planting 75' of grapes with a pasive drip system and two gardens one for the family 25' x 80' and one for the chickens 15' x 60' now I also have a 12' x 24' greenhouse set up for aquaponics with a 3600 gallon fish tank and 328 sq feet of grow bed space that will run year round.

I have 8 laying hens and in spring I will have 150 meat chickens also I will be getting a mini jersey cow in milk so I am hoping to only feed the chickens in winter if at all after it all is fruiting besides feeding the family and all the animals I will have extras to sale.


Thanks for your help
 
Andrew James
Posts: 40
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I suggest checking out Paul's podcasts and articles (chickens, no irrigation systems). I wouldn't till, nor use drip lines. Toss in a few mulberry trees for the chickens. Look into companion planting. Congrats on the new land.
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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I looked at a mulberry tree but the lower blackberries should fill the bill for the chickens, I will be doing some companion planting but not a lot as I want/need as much grass as I can get for the cow and chickens also I thought about using the irrigation on the back side of my land but I am sure the people around here are spraying chems in the irrigation ditch so I would rather use my well water to fill a tank 1-2 times a week for the drip system.

Now I could use a few in line filters for the irrigation water but that is more money and work than filling a 300 gal tank 1-2 times a week, I will check out Paul's podcasts I have read some of his stuff.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I would go for higher bio diversity and plant more types of edible fruit/nut trees along the fence line and other places even if they are from seed to reduce cost.
Check out my garden for a list of trees that you can plant they are only 10ft tall at maturity so they will not get in the way of the grass.
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AjpWBJwPQ0nMdEpjV1AwcVJ0dGFZbnVpVEw0RlFQR0E#gid=3

Do not till/destroy the grass/pasture that you currently have for the cow/chicken. You want to feed the animals meadow grass not monocrop alfalfa/etc.
Go ahead and add a few more choice grass but dont destroy what you already have.
1/2 (200ftx100ft) for a dairy cow seems really small. Which grasses do you see as the best selection of grass.

Seeing as how you are going to confine your chickens it would be best to integrate them into the greenhouse. let them feed the algae that feed the fish that provide N2 to the plants/vegetable that feeds the chicken. Its how a natural pond works. http://gardenpool.org/

It seems that you only have 1 acre of land. Unless you are getting less than 15 inches of rain per you dont need a irrigation system and esp not for berries.
The most you will need to do is water the fruit tress the once a week for 2 months with a hose the 1st summer you get them, just dont fertilize the trees.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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I don't know how much rain you get it the summer months, but drip irrigation is not what you want for the trees.
Drip irrigation promotes a shallow root system. by only watering shallowly.

Their 1st tear in the ground, you want deep waterings, to encourage their roots to go deep looking for water.
St Lawrence Nursery recommends 5-10 gallons per tree every day for the early season, then 2-3 times per week.
Cut off watering long before first frost...you want them dormant then, not still growing, ergo vulnerable.
The next spring, they should be well enough established to only need an occasional deep soak.

Deep watering makes them much more drought tolerant as they begin to mature.
Shallow watering creates a dependency on frequent watering. Not good in dry areas.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9421
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I'm concerned about you biting off more than you can chew starting all these projects in the first year, especially the dairy animal. Unless you plan to be farming full time, you might want to start with just one new kind of animal to begin with, such as the meat chickens, and add the cow next year.

Also I recommend you look at some other folks' designs to see if you can arrange your elements into a better design (not saying your design is poor, because I don't know what it is, just suggesting looking at others)

Here's a couple that I found helpful:

http://www.happyearth.com.au/garden-design/

http://permaculturenews.org/2012/06/01/zaytuna-farm-video-tour-apr-may-2012-ten-years-of-revolutionary-design/

I agree with what others are saying about drip irrigation. You might want to look into making some swales or other small earthworks for natural irrigation. Brad Lancaster's book "Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond" volume 2 is a useful resource. http://www.harvestingrainwater.com/
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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Wow thanks everyone for such great input and I will try to cover all of it.

I will be tilling because the people before me had horses and the ground is packed hard and is full of goat heads it is 0.45 of an acre and the egg layers free range and meat chickenswill be in a tractor the first year and the miniature jersey has 1/3 the feed needed and should be good once the grass is going good, I will be getting the cow in mid summer so that should be enough time for the grass to be going well.

My plan for the grass will be a mix of bluegrass big poa ampla , wildrye, great basin Leymus cinereus ,clover and some dandelions. Now my understanding was blackberries need watering the first 2-3 years is that not the case ?

My area gets a average of 13.8" of rain/snow per year, now I had at first thought about diging trench/swale along the blackberries and if needed flood the trench/swale once in early spring and again in later spring maybe I should go back to that plan ?

I will follow St Lawrence Nursery recommends for watering the tree's

I will be home/farming full time so I have the time needed to take care of all of this.

Thanks again
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9421
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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With that low amount of annual rain I think you could benefit from studying rain harvesting and planning to implement some structures. Also rain tanks.

Rainwater Harvesting Basics (1) Brad Lancaster http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iQ-FBAmvBw
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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I have thought about re-plumbing my tub and shower to drain into a gray water tank that I could use to fill/flood the trench/swales with, it would be bad to divert all gray water as the septic tank needs water to help break down the waste.

I have very little waste water and I have comp roofing but when I re-roof in about 5 years I will use steel and set up a catch system.

Thanks
 
osker brown
Posts: 146
Location: Southern Appalachia
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just a note, mulberries have much higher protein as a forage than blackberries. They should also have a longer harvest window. Also the leaves of most varieties are edible (and also high protein) and the young bark can also make cordage. The wood is quite dense and rot resistant, and makes good firewood or fence posts. They would also not require irrigation, as their roots are much deeper.

peace
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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With that little rainfall. You have alot cut out for you. You are doing to have to water the "lawn alot" to feed that cow.
And even then its not enough land to support a 1/3 cow because you cant do rotational paddock. I would plant Kuzu vine its a fast grower so with the water, the cow will have food.
Seeing as how you already "bought" the cow, you are going to have to time compress everything.
Are you going to buy hay. Have you already mulched the land. You should also plant daikon radishes too the roots digg down over 3 ft for you.
Where are you getting all this water from. What is your summer temp like I hope it is not over 95F most likely your grass will stop growing even with water if you are in the desert(100F)
Do you have any shade area for the cow. How cold does it get.

Its doable but not the best setup.
So you have no little rain only 1/2 acre and you want to plant 10ft or less fruit trees along the 600ft perimeter so thats 60 or more fruit trees.
digg a drench fill with mulch and flood irrigate to water fruit trees.

If you had no cow you could rear max 21 chicken but seeing as how you have cow that number is going down.
How do you feed the chicken off the land. With the everbearing fruit/leave trees that you have, and the insects that infest them.
worms from the cow poop. You can also plant winter squash and feed it to the chickens in the winter. run it on the ground just outside the fruit trees/fence.
You could cut the area in two 1/4 lots that way you could have a rotational paddock system giving the grass 2 weeks to recover and while also installing another
190ft (19 or more fruit trees) fence, that way could provide more fruits/leaves/insects for your chickens. I would also create areas under the fruit trees that attract bugs/slugs etc.


So plant fast growing vine on the house/tree to feed the cow.
Plant winter wheat/rye for the winter and also fava bean, they grow fast even in the cold.
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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If I go with mulberry tree's what breed (type) is best ? also I like the Kuzu vine idea would it be good to install a bunch of posts wood or steel for the kuzu and if so how tall should the posts be or would a wire line like what they use for wine grapes be better ?

The cow will get "Sprouted Fodder" when needed as I plan that for winter feed and if the chickens need winter feed they will get some also.

I was planning to have two paddocks the front and back with the back having most of the tree's, also yes I have a small barn for the cow and there is shade.

Weather: most of the summer it is in the mid 90's and will peak at about 103 and winter temps don't get very cold average about 20 deg and lows being around 10 deg.

I need to be careful not to have too many tree's that would kill my sunlight to the greenhouse that is why I want to tree's in the back as the greenhouse is in the middle of the lot to one side so the house, shed and barn will not block the sun in winter

Thanks so much everyone
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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So are elm trees good as the seeds are make up of 45% crude protein, so can/would chickens eat the seeds ?
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Ok I have a few questions for you
How big is the total property:
How big is the pasture area
Is the barn area different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.
Is the greenhouse different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.
Is your living/house area different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.

You can catch the water from your house roof+barn roof+greenhouse roof and use it for your pasture.
This could easily measure 1/10 of an acre so you could double your rainfall if you send that water to an equal amount of pasture.

How much gray water do you produce, you already flush your shit with water are you sure your septic tank needs more water, if so why.
Could you add a biological agent so that your septic tank needs less water.
It would be nice to use all your greywater to water your trees.
Dont use your grey water on pasture only on living fence/trees. You can use your roof water anywhere you want (vegetables/fish/pasture/cow drinking water/trees)

I would only have 10ft or less living fence and 1 big 30ft+ tree in each paddock under which you could but your water bucket in the 100F sun, for a total of two 30ft trees.
For those two trees I would go with the Illinois Everybearing, or any everybearing. I would not go for the elm.

In the living fence you can plant 9ft dwarf hazelnut, protein content is 38%. And in the back living fence you can plant regular 12ft hazelnut trees.

I would use all the vertical surface that you have to grow grapes. The chicken+cow will eat grapes and the cow will eat the leaves.
I am not too sure if kuzu is illegal/ban in your state.

Its best to give the pasture grass a full year to grow really deep roots before stressing with grazing.
However one just have to work with what you have.

What do you plan on having in your greenhouse vegetables or dwarf mango trees, lol.

I would do aquaponics if it is vegetables. It will regulate the temp in the summer and the winter so longer growing season at no heating cost.
It will also provide fish for you to eat and nitrogen for your vegetables. You can keep the "fish/water" under your vegetable table Here is a guy in Phoenix, Arizona doing it.
http://www.gardenpool.org

If your greenhouse is just for "mango/tropical trees" water drums/etc will still regulate the summer and winter.
Also if you are using city water and not well its best to let the chlorine evaporate 1st by letting the water sit in "buckets" before you water with it.

You can also grow trees cover them with vines and then manually feed the cow the vines. and the chicken could eat the fruits of the tree and the vine.
There might even be grass growing under the treen grow under the tree and I am sure their will be more high protein bugs for the chicken.
Plus with your 100% more desert sunlight compared to east coast means that you are full sun even under the tree. So your grass will grow as long as you can provide it sun light.
Think vine root in a bucket of water/soil leaves growing under the tree on the ground.

Here is a good paddock seed mix:
mustard
burdock
alfalfa
lamb's quarter
fava bean
sweet clover
lupine
landino clover
buckwheat
hairy vetch
daikon
black-eyed peas
comfrey
sun flower
yarrow
borage
chamomile
dandelion
turnip
bee balm
lavender
mullein
pea (pisum arvitiuse)
stinging nettle
chard
maximillian sunflower
sorghum
 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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I am going line by line so I don't leave anything out.

S Bengi wrote:Ok I have a few questions for you
How big is the total property:


The whole lot is 90'x330' or 0.68 of an acre that runs North and South


How big is the pasture area


The pasture is 90'x200'


Is the barn area different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.


The barn is in the pasture.


Is the greenhouse different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.


The greenhouse is in the pasture.


Is your living/house area different from the pasture area and if so how big is it.


No it is in the front of the lot 90'x130' so there is a 'front and back lawn area for the dogs and kids.


You can catch the water from your house roof+barn roof+greenhouse roof and use it for your pasture.


I did not want to catch the water because of having comp roofing but after I reroof it I will use steel and at the time setup a catchment.


This could easily measure 1/10 of an acre so you could double your rainfall if you send that water to an equal amount of pasture.

Yes


How much gray water do you produce, you already flush your shit with water are you sure your septic tank needs more water, if so why.


About 40-60 gallons a day


Could you add a biological agent so that your septic tank needs less water.


I could but the cost to pump out the tank and could cause the cost to up big time if a R&R of the system is needed early.


It would be nice to use all your greywater to water your trees.


Yes that is my plan if/when I set it up, now with that I will need to check the ph to see if I need to change anyting


Dont use your grey water on pasture only on living fence/trees. You can use your roof water anywhere you want (vegetables/fish/pasture/cow drinking water/trees)


The gray water was going to be used for the 3 tree's and lawn around the house.


I would only have 10ft or less living fence and 1 big 30ft+ tree in each paddock under which you could but your water bucket in the 100F sun, for a total of two 30ft trees.


Ok I already have a 30' tall elm at the very back NE corner


For those two trees I would go with the Illinois Everybearing, or any everybearing. I would not go for the elm.


I will look into this and maybe remove the elm.


In the living fence you can plant 9ft dwarf hazelnut, protein content is 38%. And in the back living fence you can plant regular 12ft hazelnut trees.


I like nut tree's but one of my kids has nut allergies so I was trying to stay away from them.


I would use all the vertical surface that you have to grow grapes. The chicken+cow will eat grapes and the cow will eat the leaves.


So grapes along the fence line instead of blackberries ?


I am not too sure if kuzu is illegal/ban in your state.


Idaho


Its best to give the pasture grass a full year to grow really deep roots before stressing with grazing.
However one just have to work with what you have

So would it be better to leave the chickens on the grass and contain the cow to a small area and sprout feed till the first year for the grass to grow ?



What do you plan on having in your greenhouse vegetables or dwarf mango trees, lol.
I would do aquaponics if it is vegetables. It will regulate the temp in the summer and the winter so longer growing season at no heating cost.
It will also provide fish for you to eat and nitrogen for your vegetables. You can keep the "fish/water" under your vegetable table Here is a guy in Phoenix, Arizona doing it.
http://www.gardenpool.org


It is a Aquaponics system with a 3800 gal tank full of Tilapia and 340 sq ft of grow bed space for Tomato, bell peppers, carrots, broccoli, bunching onions, lettuce, parsley, oregano, basil and strawberries




If your greenhouse is just for "mango/tropical trees" water drums/etc will still regulate the summer and winter.


No


Also if you are using city water and not well its best to let the chlorine evaporate 1st by letting the water sit in "buckets" before you water with it.


Its well water


You can also grow trees cover them with vines and then manually feed the cow the vines. and the chicken could eat the fruits of the tree and the vine.
There might even be grass growing under the treen grow under the tree and I am sure their will be more high protein bugs for the chicken.
Plus with your 100% more desert sunlight compared to east coast means that you are full sun even under the tree. So your grass will grow as long as you can provide it sun light.
Think vine root in a bucket of water/soil leaves growing under the tree on the ground.


OK



Here is a good paddock seed mix:
mustard
burdock
alfalfa
lamb's quarter
fava bean
sweet clover
lupine
landino clover
buckwheat
hairy vetch
daikon
black-eyed peas
comfrey
sun flower
yarrow
borage
chamomile
dandelion
turnip
bee balm
lavender
mullein
pea (pisum arvitiuse)
stinging nettle
chard
maximillian sunflower
sorghum


Now do you mean to mix all of those types of seeds or just pick a few ?


Thanks so much for your help.


 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I would get all 27 of them @ 4 each thats around $100.
The main thing to remember is that you want 4 types of plants 1.N-fixers, 2.Drymass, 3.Pest control/medicine, 4.Aerating roots
I would plant 7-12 plants in each category.

I would not put the grapes/vines in the living fence. I would plant the grape on the barn and on your house.
I would also extend the living fence all the way around your property including the house area.

So 330+330+90+90+90. thats 840ft with a 5ft spacing you can fit 168 plants.
If each plant provide 5lbs of fruit that 840lbs of feed for your chicken or 84lbs of chicken meat aka 17 birds.

You grey water already empties out on your land through the drain-field so I would not worry about the ph too much.
However it would be nice if you use eco-friendly/natural soap/shampoo and detergents.

If your kid is allergic to any nut other than peanut dont plant any nut trees, but if it is just peanut, said kid might be ok.

 
Nancy Sinclaire
Posts: 29
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To lessen the need for extra water to the septic tank consider putting "clean" used Toilet Paper into the trash.

Depending on what you use for dish washing, soap and shampoo, toothpaste products maybe select if the kitchen sink, bathroom sink, bath tub, washing machine would have the cleanest grey water and plumb those to grey water. Leaving part to help the septic system along.

The "'front and back lawn area for the dogs and kids." can sometimes, (on special holidays) be opened up to the chickens and even the cow. This would be especially handy in the very earliest of spring since that is when the paddock needs time to rev up. Plus they fertilize for free and in the early spring there is less outside activity by humans so fertilizing will not be so problematic.

"I would get all 27 of them @ 4 each thats around $100." After the season some drug stores sell their seeds 10 cents a packet. The choice is leftovers. Put notice in the paper asking for people's outdated seeds. The diversity is key. I would put 100% of resources on keeping these well watered early on. The grocery store has seeds in one pound packages for cooking. Some of these are viable. I agree with the root vegetables for breaking up the soil. They will do the work for you. Maybe seed balls is what is needed. The paddock seeds listed are about what the drug store will have left on clearance. Count the packets and offer to purchase the whole bunch for even deeper discount to take them off of the store managers hands. Toss a couple into your sprouting mix.

Can you toss some tree seeds onto your neighbors land and divert the hose onto them a few times?

Where is the water from the roof going to now?

Your elm tree has it's own personal hugger and it is me. Can you give it a 5 or 3 year reprieve? At the very least it is providing diversity. It is also providing shade that can help get other trees established without sun beating down on it quite so bad. The leaves provide for the compost pile. Can leaves be used as bedding for chickens?

"Tomato, bell peppers, carrots, broccoli, bunching onions, lettuce, parsley, oregano, basil and strawberries" I have a wild and crazy idea for you. Select one seed packet per year that is just wild and crazy. Something you would never, ever in a million years plant. Something that has no practical purpose. Maybe pumpkins with warts, or crazy color decorative corn, or a package of mixed decorative squashes. The youngen's will take an interest in gardening cool things. Maybe etch youngen's names into young hubbard squash. This great fun when done can be stored until the darkest part of winter to feed the chickens. Nothing is wasted.

To fill a bare paddock quickly gather what seeds you can from nature for free. The type maybe does not matter because it will be eaten or stepped on.


 
Travis Day
Posts: 26
Location: Idaho, 43rd parallel Zone 6A
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We are careful with the toilet paper, The gray water I would use would only be from the tub/shower and bathroom sinks.

The chickens will get 2 days a week to be on the front and back lawns to keep the bugs away from the house and fertilize.

I will be looking for all 27 types of seeds, in the family ground garden I will have potatoes,sweet potatoes,pumkin,Painted Mountain corn and I hope to get some glass gem corn.

Yes I could toss some seeds over the fence.....LOL But I would just ask since she does not use her back 1/2 acre also I have thought about asking her if she wanted to lease it to me for 5 years and I could use it as a paddock for the chickens and cow.

The roof water goes to the ground.

The elm tree lol because it is just a few inches inside of the fence line on my back northeast corner it provides almost no shade on my land but it blocks a lot of sun from the neighbors garden so they would be happy if I cut it down.



Thanks everyone it is very helpful.







 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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If you sent the greywater to just your living fence, they would get an extra 7 inches of "rain". So 20 inches per year vs just 13.
If you do hold your greywater, to water the plants in the cooler night, dont hold it for more than 24hrs otherwise the bacteria population will exploded.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9421
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here is a good reference for greywater design: http://oasisdesign.net/greywater/index.htm
 
James Colbert
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Grapes naturally climb trees. For natural growing grapes in arms reach try growing a siberian pea shrub ( or other fast growing nitrogen fixing shrub) and grape vines together.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Does any know how much lbs of seed is need to per acre to create a pasture meadow form a completely denuded site.
Form what I have been reading it seem like it takes 25lbs. I have seen 10-25lbs as the avg but have also seen some saying 50lbs.
I am looking for vendors so if anyone knows of any let me know too.
So far this is the what I have found. Seems like the price is $4/lbs or less
http://www.mainstreetseedandsupply.com/Wildlife_Habitat_Seed_s/58.htm
http://sustainableseedco.com/compost-cover-crops/

It also seems like chickling vetch is better than hairy vetch in your arid area.
 
Craig Dobbelyu
gardener
Posts: 1414
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur rabbit trees
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http://www.johnnyseeds.com/c-4-cover-cropsfarm-seeds.aspx

might be something here worth looking at.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Posts: 9421
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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S Bengi wrote:Does any know how much lbs of seed is need to per acre to create a pasture meadow form a completely denuded site.
Form what I have been reading it seem like it takes 25lbs.


Native seed vendor in my region says around 8- 10 lbs per acre, depending on the mix, but recommends using 2 to 10 times as much for faster coverage: http://www.seedsource.com/catalog/detail.asp?product_id=2021
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Tyler Ludens wrote:
S Bengi wrote:Does any know how much lbs of seed is need to per acre to create a pasture meadow form a completely denuded site.
Form what I have been reading it seem like it takes 25lbs.


Native seed vendor in my region says around 8- 10 lbs per acre, depending on the mix, but recommends using 2 to 10 times as much for faster coverage: http://www.seedsource.com/catalog/detail.asp?product_id=2021


Thats a really really good biomass mix, one grassroot going down 20ft, another 12ft and another 8ft. Needing as little as 12 inches of rain per year. I really like this biomass/DM combo.
 
James Colbert
Posts: 271
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S Bengi wrote:I would get all 27 of them @ 4 each thats around $100.
The main thing to remember is that you want 4 types of plants 1.N-fixers, 2.Drymass, 3.Pest control/medicine, 4.Aerating roots
I would plant 7-12 plants in each category.

I would not put the grapes/vines in the living fence. I would plant the grape on the barn and on your house.
I would also extend the living fence all the way around your property including the house area.

So 330+330+90+90+90. thats 840ft with a 5ft spacing you can fit 168 plants.
If each plant provide 5lbs of fruit that 840lbs of feed for your chicken or 84lbs of chicken meat aka 17 birds.

You grey water already empties out on your land through the drain-field so I would not worry about the ph too much.
However it would be nice if you use eco-friendly/natural soap/shampoo and detergents.

If your kid is allergic to any nut other than peanut dont plant any nut trees, but if it is just peanut, said kid might be ok.



It's nitrogen fixer, biomass, pest attractant/repellant, and deep rooted nutrient accumulators.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1356
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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I found something that will help you fast track your pasture.
This will improve infiltration and provide shade from the sun.
http://www.permaculturenews.org/2012/09/19/imprinting-soils-creating-instant-edge-for-large-scale-revegetation-of-barren-lands/
 
Ever since I found this suit I've felt strange new needs. And a tiny ad:
2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
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