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Yellowing of leaves in beans and legume family  RSS feed

 
Paulo Bessa
pollinator
Posts: 356
Location: Portugal (zone 9) and Iceland (zone 5)
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Hi everyone, I have often experienced and also heard from other people, complains of beans suffering often from yellowing of their leaves.

It is speculated to be due to many possible reasons:
- lack of sunlight (like overcast days)
- excessive watering (beans dislike constantly moist soil, preferring well draining soil, and dry soil between deep waterings)
- lack of mycorrhiza, which can cause a nitrogen lack, or lack of another trace nutrient (magnesium could be one, or perhaps another one)
- a disease or some problem with the soil, which can also be linked with the lack of water drainage. Can be some sort of root rot.
- or perhaps the crops dislike the constant temperature of the greenhouse, but it does not seem that bad (is around 20-25ÂșC)

Any experience with this yellowing in legume crops?

In my greenhouse, I have seen this problem affecting many legume crops: lima beans, winged beans, runner beans, cow peas, snap peas, climbing beans, siberian pea shrub, groundnut (apios), peanut and pigeon peas. Some containers seem more affected than others, some varieties more affected than others, but there seems to be a widespread reason for this. Affects seedlings and also often and suddently larger plants.

I have tried experimenting with adding artificial lights, full spectrum organic fertilizers, dolomite/lime, changing type of soil, avoiding watering, but nothing seems to fix it.

My next step is now trying a full spectrum mycorrhiza and repotting with some vermicompost into the soil, and see if something changes. Moving plants outdoors is out of question as is still rather cold.
 
Paulo Bessa
pollinator
Posts: 356
Location: Portugal (zone 9) and Iceland (zone 5)
13
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After reading a little bit further I now suspect that what I have is actually a virus disease.

The problem in my plants seems identical to the photos that come up with a google search of bean mosaic virus infected plants.

This probably makes plants more vulnerable to root rot, and it is probably that irregular watering and the lack of some sunlight are also weaken the plants. And furthermore it explains why the plants do not seem to improve upon fertilization or changing conditions.

Anyone knows if mosaic infected plants can still flower and produce seed? Are the seeds going to be "infected"?

PS: ok, I discovered the answer to these question is yes and yes.
 
Morgan Morrigan
Posts: 1400
Location: Verde Valley, AZ.
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try a heavy zinc application, and see if it knocks the virus down enough to let the myco overpower it.

have read that only one type of zinc is good for uptake, but don't know if just any one can be used for antiviral.

If doesnt work, only thing left is boric acid, and re-innoculate soil. Might try each as an experiment.
 
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