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BONSAI AND PERMACULTURE

 
Mateo Chester
Posts: 148
Location: Zone 4b
4
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Does anyone incorporate/utilize the Bonsai concept into their organic/permaculture/sustainable design systems? If so, could you please explain your thoughts and process? Are these two concepts contradictory? Or is there a way to harness the design of deformity and synchronize it with permaculture design? Thanks ahead of time..

cHeStEr
 
Mark Livett
Posts: 58
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I am in an urban area and most of my trees are in pots. I don't do much root pruning but I do prune the top so I guess there is dieback in the roots which were supplying those branches.

I also air layer from mature trees so I can get a head start, one of the techniques I learned from my Bonsai books.

They are not meant to look deformed, I think you are doing it wrong

 
Mateo Chester
Posts: 148
Location: Zone 4b
4
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Thanks for the response Mark. I am glad to know someone else is doing bonsai.. I am a renter, so my ability to use this space the way I would like to is very limited. Most of my methods revolve around this fact.. I end up using pots because they are less permanent. It makes learning about/implementing a system such as permaculture somewhat of a challenge... And about the deformity thing. I was referencing the "art of deformity", as I have heard this phrase used to describe the bonsai process. It makes sense to me in the way that we are altering/re-guiding/controlling (to a greater extend)/ and ultimately deforming nature. With that, I most certainly root prune. In my understanding, it is fundamental to the bonsai process and crucial to keeping plants alive for years. I have had a basil plant go for at least 16 months in a 5 x 5 inch square pot. I needed the space and the basil plant gladly went to Mrs. Chester's crock pot recipe. Bonsai is a great way to keep numerous plants in a tiny space. Also a great way of keeping mother plants for propagation...

Anyways, the plants are all but "deformed". If anything, they are re-formed.
 
Michael Milligan
Posts: 55
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I don't have any land either, but did bonsai for years in the past. Most of it is done in the ground anyway. Other that the final potted trees which would certainly be a zone on plant (and there is nothing wrong with growing for beauty) I would collect plants from the property, and field grow many tree seedlings for future use. Layering off established plants is the ultimate source of material!
 
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