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Starting Hickories North of Lake Huron

 
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I've been collecting whips off of the fallen Shagbark Hickory trees in Aylmer, Quebec. They root easily so I am hoping to establish a sheltered belt of Hicks on my woodlot.
My land is in a micro clime along of the north shore of Lake Huron and it is similar to where the parent trees are existing now.

I've also collected some nice thick fallen limbs. Hickory is a nice dense wood, also good for smoking food and I collected it just because I like the texture of it.
 
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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You're going to really have to work your micro climates to get anything from them that far north. The most northerly hickories are found in the Ottawa Valley. It might be a good idea to try some of those as well.
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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If you are within 50-60km of the lake, you are probably in zone 4.
I know that St. Lawrence Nursery in zone 3 NY raises Shagbarks from seed (from local trees) at their facility.
So that climate is not out of their range.

They might need some extra care for the first winter (or 2), but don't pamper them too much.
They need to get used to your weather, or they will need pampering forever.

Good luck.

 
Jo Sedore
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I live in Ottawa and my homestead is west of Sudbury.

Along the North shore of Lake Huron, there are pockets of old forest that are more commonly found further south. I have found a tulip tree in a stand along the shoreline. I know you can get peaches to grow and produce fruit in the Soo as long as you have them well sheltered.
The big lake holds its heat well into the fall. People think of that area as being far north but I have had growing seasons where the killing frost didnt happen until late November.

I've been in the Ottawa valley for 4 years now. The Valley weather is much drier with a wider swing of temps than along the North shore.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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If you can grow peaches, then it should be possible to grow hickory, American chestnut and hazel nuts. Time spent in horrible weather near Marathon on the north shore of Lake Superior, convinced me to move west in 93.
 
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