new videos
hot off the press!  
    more about rocket
mass heaters here.

more videos from
the PDC here.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Companion Strategies similar to Three Sisters?  RSS feed

 
chris neglia
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am new to permaculture, hugelkultur, companion planting and gardening in general. I guess you could say I'm intellectually lazy because I'm finding it difficult to come up with strategies of which plants go where based on a compatibility / friend-foe chart, not to mention all the other things I didn't know when I looked at the chart such as the use of nasturdium and marigold to ward off pests.

This is why I find a very clear strategy like Three Sisters invaluable. It's a recipe: stay confined within the recipe until you learn this stuff cold or are more comfortable to venture out--that's my strategy.

Is there a list of other approaches similar to THree Sisters?

I'm looking specifically for strategies that use hugelkultur, mushrooms, grains, orchards (fruit/nut), medicinal herbs, green manuring and forest gardens; where every player is a highly functional, beneficial input.

Thanks in advance for your help!
 
chris neglia
Posts: 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Found an interesting article on using metatron's cube / sacred geometry for optimal pattern planting in companion gardening.

http://www.wisdom-earth.com/Default.aspx?8=8&id=companion_planting&page=1#page_1

 
John Elliott
pollinator
Posts: 2392
79
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If y'all are down here in the South, there are the Three Southern Sisters: okra, sweet potatoes, and butter beans (and sometimes you can replace peanuts for the sweet potatoes). Okra is just as good a "pole" crop as corn, although it may not get as tall as some corn varieties. Sweet potatoes and peanuts make great ground covers -- if you can keep the rabbits and squirrels away.

The regular Three Sisters does not make use of a root crop and with either sweet potatoes or peanuts, you are going to be tearing up your field at harvest. I haven't noticed that doing that is a problem with hugelbeds, in fact, they lift out of the ground easier. And then after it's harvested, you usually have time to sew some type of cole crop like collards that can be cut throughout the winter.
 
when your children are suffering from your punishment, tell your them it will help them write good poetry when they are older. Like this tiny ad:
double chamber cob oven plans - download
https://permies.com/t/52989/digital-market/digital-market/double-chamber-cob-oven-plans
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!