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Coriander

 
Martin Gak
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Hello all, i am new here and quite new with plants in general. Until a few months ago, my only experience with plants concerned killing a few here and there, never intentionally. My latest experiment is coriander and I have had a rather rough time. The plant seems quite finicky. So I need to advice. Here is what I did...

I planted seeds in a pot (all my plants are indoor cause I live in an apt in Berlin). I planted pretty densely following some or other youtube instruction. Probably about 5 seeds per sq inch. The pot sits on the window shelf. It germinates and sprouts a very dense folliage. So far so good. After a few weeks, I start getting the anemic stalks.

It seems to me I am either watering too much or too little or the seeds are too close together or the direct sunlight is not working. Does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks,
Martin
 
John Elliott
pollinator
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Welcome to Permies, Martin!

Coriander (also known as cilantro) is a short-lived plant and you are doing nothing wrong. It sends up those "anemic stalks" when it is getting ready to flower, set seed, and die. You just have to let it go to seed, pick the seed and start a new pot on the window shelf, and the cycle repeats itself. In a cool, northern climate like Berlin, you probably get one growth cycle per year outside in the garden. Since coriander is a cold-hardy plant, where I am, it grows slowly all through the winter, and then when spring comes, I can get 3, maybe 4 cycles during the hot months.

If you keep it outside (do you have a south facing balcony?) you may be able to keep it bushy all through the winter. But once it has bolted and sent up some anemic stalks, you can't turn the clock back and reset it to the bushy mode. It should be hardy down to about -10C, however, if you keep it protected or covered, the temperature can get even colder and it will still survive. The protection can be as simple as a PET plastic bottle with the bottom cut off sitting on top of the pot.
 
Martin Gak
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Ok, great. Thanks a lot. I took the plant off of the sun and watered it in the evening. This morning she looks much happier. I have a hard time gauging the amount of water for cilantro. The plant does not seem to like too much water.
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I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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