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question for Ben: woodgas vs. hydrogen  RSS feed

 
Israel Hensley
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Hi Ben! I love that someone has finally brought better plans the the scene than the old FEMA material. Thank you! I live off grid and I've been playing with Hydrogen/hydoxy gas production for all sorts of energy applications. I'm sure you're probably well read on the topic. With a properly pulsed circuit, the sun can make H2 for me to use on demand or later (the later requires storage in hydride tanks). Anyhow, my question is how do you feel wood gas compares as far as the work to make it vs. The work you get out if it? I have lots and lots of wood (56 acres) but I figured if I can get the work without cutting wood, why not?I've seen cars run on both and heat made with both, but you chose wood... why? I have the means to make a wood gassifier and would love to compare. Our earthship constructuon will be done this summer and I will be back to doing lots of experiments. Thanks in advance for your answers!
 
Ben Peterson
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Israel:
Good question. For me it's the shear volume of woodgas I can make. My hydrogen electrolysis experiments haven't yielded engine capable volumes. A wood gasifier uses about 60 watts to power a blower that can pull enough gas to run a respectable genset. This is the chemistry approach to hydrogen. Say 20 cubic meters of gas per hour at 20% hydrogen is 4 cubic meters per hour

If you have a good means to make H2 from electricity I am very interested. I have seen people use carbon (soot) and aluminum oxide mixed into water to make hydrogen, but you need the aluminum. It would be nice to use solar panels to make clean H2. I would mix my hydrogen with plastic oils to make storable diesel instead of the storage tank method.

There was a story about a university using a AAA battery to split water. Pretty cool.

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/august/splitter-clean-fuel-082014.html
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://stoves2.com
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