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Chinaberry stumps

 
Loyed Blackburn
Posts: 3
Location: Northeast Texas
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I'm in the process of cutting down around 20 Chinaberry trees. That leaves the stumps.

I'd prefer to use fungi to decompose the stumps. As a 'cedar' though it looks like it might not be worth the effort/resource. Has anyone done this with the Chinaberry?
 
Will Meginley
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Location: Concord, New Hampshire
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Loyed Blackburn wrote:I'm in the process of cutting down around 20 Chinaberry trees. That leaves the stumps.

I'd prefer to use fungi to decompose the stumps. As a 'cedar' though it looks like it might not be worth the effort/resource. Has anyone done this with the Chinaberry?


"Cedar" can be used to describe a lot of different species, but as far as I know, all of them are gymnosperms (conifers). According to this article published by the University of Florida Extension Service, chinaberry is in the mahogany family, making it an angiosperm (commonly referred to as hardwoods), not a gymnosperm. I think if you choose a fungus variety that grows on hardwoods it'll probably work.

I have no direct experience with this, though.
 
Loyed Blackburn
Posts: 3
Location: Northeast Texas
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Thank you I was confused because some sources kept stating cedar lol. I've discovered a downed Chinaberry pile of limbs that has Reishi growing all on their own. This is in the middle of a yellow runner bamboo patch adjacent to a water puddle/sink. Btw, I'm not just willy nilly cutting down trees. There are a few Chinaberry left intact. What an awesome tree!
 
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