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Our deciduous trees, volunteer and native plants and their uses.

 
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I have a post in the wwoofers forum about my property and some of the things going on here. It is a particularly windy morning and I'm not in the mood to work outdoors so I'm starting seeds indoors and got to thinking as I watched all the trees sway in the wind... We have a ton of volunteer/pioneer/native plants including many deciduous trees that are very useful to homesteading/permaculture.

I'm going to name a few and their uses. Please feel free to chime in if I've missed anything or with your own personal plants and their uses.

Oak - multiple varieties
-acorns for food
-leaves great for humanure
-wood
Fire
Timber
Furniture/woodworking

Pine - Gray, Ponderosa, Sugar, White
-timber (mostly the white which is more rare here)
-firewood (outdoor, not in dry season. The pitch causes popping and spark throwing)
-pitch/tar/SAP
Fire starter/fuel
Glue
Seal wounds
-needles
Vitamin c tea
Pine straw
Kindling
Mulch for plants requiring acidic soil i.e. blueberry's...
-pine cones
Kindling
Pine nuts
Decoration/art

Manzanita
-berries
Food/drink
Fodder
Possibly dye?
-leaves
Medicinal/hydrating tea
Poultice
Can be chewed to rehydrate (bitter/sour)
-wood great for crafting. Burns very fast and crackles/throws sparks

Yerba Santa
-mainly known for its medicinal purposes. I also use it in my compost mix and hugel projects

Vetch
-livestock fodder
-nitrogen fixer
-green manure
-pretty flowers all spring

Grass

Clover
-fodder
-pollinators
-tea
-nitrogen fixer
-green manure

Wildflowers
-pollinators

Buckeye
-don't know much about this one, perhaps some help? I've seen a few around

Blackberries
-food
-barrier/fencing

There are thousands more to discover, but these are the main ones I notice and know. Now it's your turn... Go.
 
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Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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I have volunteer mimosa trees in part of my property that I am converting to food forest.
This area was used as a standard row garden by the previous owner and it is depleted of nitrogen so I am letting the mimosas grow to help replentish that.

I also have sumac trees coming up there and they are growing very well, so I am leaving them to provide shade for other plants.

Wild violets are running wild across my property for the last few years, they make great ground cover / green manure / edible flowers and leaves.
 
Andrew Morse
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Wow, nice Cris! Sounds like you have a lot of stuff we don't have here. Is that East Coast? Would seem to be East of the Rockies anyway...
 
Cris Bessette
gardener
Posts: 887
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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Yeah, well North Georgia Appalachian mountain region.

I have two acres, one acre of that I used to mow, I'm down to just mowing foot paths through it. I have all kinds of "surprise" useful plants that come up that I used to mow down.
For instance my two cherry trees became 10+ cherry trees because of all the root suckers that I stopped mowing down. Some are less than 4 years old and already fruiting!

It's amazing what doing LESS WORK has given me! lol
 
Can you really tell me that we aren't dealing with suspicious baked goods? And then there is this tiny ad:
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https://permies.com/wiki/permaculture-tech-2020
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