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I am moving from tennessee. My kids live in Maine and I want to be closer to them. So I need to know what is the bad of living off grid no septic no public utilities, Politically speaking, In Vermont or new Hampshire or maine? Are there counties that are not subject to the international building code? What are the taxes like in those states. My place will be small. The land I'll be looking for would be about 5 acres.
In tn in the county I'm in they only inspect grid tied electric And septic. My taxes are about $150 a year. I stay away from most people and don't advertise what I'm doing and so I'm left alone. Could I have hope of having that same expectation if I live in one of those states?
 
Posts: 218
Location: New Hampshire
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bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
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If you move back to New England rent for at least a year.  Zoning, permits, deed restrictions, convents, HOAs, and other restrictions vary so much from town to town that a lot of research is needed to reduce the level of government in your life. 

In NH everything varies by town.  On the state level you will be required to have a permit and inspection for a septic system.  Gray water is mostly illegal but they are working on that.  There are no county level restrictions.

The town of Grafton in NH has no permits and a very libertarian planning board.  It has low property taxes for NH and a very DIY culture.  It is 35 minutes to the closest grocery store and DSL is only available in part of the town.  There are a few other towns in NH that are similar to Grafton in it's level of regulation and all of them are in the central to northern part of NH.  In general the closer you get to the Massachusetts boarder things get more expensive and the amount of permits and restrictions dramatically increase. 

If you need to be somewhere with in commuting distance to Boston and high speed internet going through the town regulations is worth the hassle. By going through the town regulations we avoided some towns with crazy levels of permit requirements even though they were close to my husband's work.   We managed to find a house on the edge of suburbia with agricultural zoning and if we bought on the other side of town we wouldn't even be allowed to have chickens.  
 
dan simon
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well i will by necessity have to avoid almost all codes and permitting. i am poor. Codes and permitting like taxes and speeding tickets have the greatest adverse effect on people in my economic class. i will be completely off grid with no septic. ill compost my contributions. As for grey water i'm not worried about that. i am very low use on water. i will do rain collection and i do so now. i use maybe a gallon for a shower and maybe 2 for dishes. when i have my kids that goes up for a little while but as i work 40 plus i just don't use much. my house will be small 16 x 20. and i emphasize absolutely no utilities. my main concern is being left alone with little expense compounded on my already stressful life. im very libertarian and don't believe all the government regulation is necessary or viable. Its a ludicrous stressor arbitrarily placed on us for the illusion of safety and better living.
Thank you for your reply it is helpful to know where people are more inclined towards these ideas. those areas will be the best place to start.
Is NH in and of itself more libertarian than VT? I don't mind a 3 or 4 hour commute to get my kids. i currently travel 20 hours 1 way.
finding a place to rent up there is a possibility but a slim one. getting a job, paying rent saving and all the other bills that come with living in a conventional situation really add up.
 
Kate Muller
Posts: 218
Location: New Hampshire
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bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur
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If you tend to be very libertarian You may want to check out the Free State Project.  For low cost living you may be able to find some like minded roommates to rent from till you can get settled in a more permanent location.   You may find buying or renting a vacation cabin a good way to get settled.  Be careful some cabins are only allowed part year residence and they tend to be the type of living situation that would be ideal for you.

There are quite a few people that moved to NH as part of the Free State Project that are into sustainable agriculture, permacuture and reducing the department of making you sad as much as possible.  

https://freestateproject.org/  ;
 
Posts: 44
Location: White Mountains of New Hampshire zone 5
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books dog hugelkultur
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Hi, I'm also from NH in Albany. We have some of the lowest property taxes, but is a Planning Board, and building codes etc. The next town South of us is Tamworth. They have no zoning so you can do what you will. Their taxes I'm not sure about, because there is an elementary school in town. You don't mention what you do to see if there is a need for that service up here.
 
pollinator
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I live in Maine and up to a few months ago my town was pretty open to building stuff, but just voted in the International Building Codes. It really is sweeping the entire region so no one can really say. If you find a town that does not have the International Building Code, get there quick because come Town meeting Day (March) they just might have it.

Here we have LURC in the unorganized towns, but because they cover a broad area, their rules are broad as well.

One piece of advice: there is a saying in Maine at least, "Come winter you better have a pile of dry firewood, or a big pile of cash, but never get caught in Maine in the winter without one or the other." It is sound advice.
 
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