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how to get goats into a crate in order to transport

 
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I'm trying figure out an easy way to get one of my goats into a crate in order to transport them. I thought of opening the crate door, throwing some hay into the back of it, waiting for the goat to go in to get it and closing the crate door behind him. Does anybody know of an easier or efficient method of doing this? What I want to avoid is physically grabbing the goat and forcing him into the crate. I tried this last time with a couple of my wethers and it was not pretty. I don't want to stress them out or scare them. Any advice would be great. Thanks
 
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I just shove them in, but that's not the answer you want. So.....

Why not use the crate to feed them their tasty foods, like grains or alfalfa? I sort of do this with my sheep. I have a special small run-in pen where they get their goodies. In fact, that's the ONLY spot that they get them, ever. Thus they are all eager to enter the small pen, then exit down the shoot in order to get a tiny handful of grain before exiting. Then whenever I need to work with them, I simply shut the exit gate on the end of the shoot. They all pile down the shoot but can't leave, whereupon I can go down the line to deworm them, trim hooves, or whatever.

In your case, I'd prop the door open and condition them to go into the crate for goodies. Get them use to your walking around the crate, touching their butts, touching the door. Just don't close them in just for the fun of it, because once they are spooked they may not go back for quite a while. Of course, this conditioning may take several days or several weeks. It's not a quick fix.
 
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Normally goats shouldn't have problems getting into crates. Although the younger they are, the easier. Some, especially wethers or bucks, are worse. What I would try is finding a goat that doesn't have a problem with going in the crate. The best candidate for this would probably be a doeling. A lot of goats will feel more comfortable doing things they would normally have to be forced to do if they see another goat who is chill about doing it.
 
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